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Hi I was wondering how people pace there endurance races?

I mainly race 100k and six hour events. I pretty much go flat out for half an hour then back off to upper level 2, 150bpm and up. How would I go about finding my sweet spot? I have heard it is the best compromise in intensity.

Cheers: thumbsup:
 

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danza said:
Hi I was wondering how people pace there endurance races?

I mainly race 100k and six hour events. I pretty much go flat out for half an hour then back off to upper level 2, 150bpm and up. How would I go about finding my sweet spot? I have heard it is the best compromise in intensity.

Cheers: thumbsup:
Sweet Spot: Part Deux

Sweet Spot Original Article

I'd suggest a Field Test to properly set up your zones and to ensure you are in-fact training in the "Sweet Spot".
 

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even with finding your optimum sweet spot the more input you can get back from your computer the better you can judge how fast to go. i have a set speed or heart rate, but have a flexable attidude on how i am feeling and what my HR is doing over the long term.


things like heat or nutrition are big factors.




also sometimes in a race situation your intensity has to go up and down to stay competitive. train for that too.
 

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If I don't care about being competitive, I find my sweet spot is where I begin to have trouble carrying on a conversation because I'm breathing to hard (but still able to talk).

If I'm trying to be competitive, well... somewhere between wanting to puke and questiong why I decide to race bikes on a weekend when I could be drinking beers.
 

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I don't look at heart rate in a 6 hour solo race (which usually works out around 110km). My strategy is basically that if people want to pass you on the first lap and smash themselves, let them. Just back it off and take it easy for the first two laps, until the field spreads out. There's nothing more pointless than smashing yourself on a climb early in to then just get held up by 200 casual riders. It's usually around the 4 hour mark that I start moving from 30th up to 10th because I've just taken it slowly for the first 4 hours.

The exception to this rule for me is in marathons if there is a hard/long climb at the start. In that case, I need to smash the climb (as that's where I make up minutes) and ensure nutrition is taken care of in that first hour.
The problem with this is that then you become the carrot. If you're a strong climber and there's a major climb at the end of the race, flip it around and use them as carrots.
In marathons it can be really important to know where you are.
 

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Use a race or two as test races...

I use to use a heart rate monitor but I found I focused on it way too much. Keeping it at that 150 tops 160 rate was limiting. I did a couple test races with the monitor but taped and found that I can ride much more wide open without it being a negative later on in a race. If you haven't, give that a try, and review your peformance. Each of us is unique.
 
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