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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can find cheap front lights, but stumped why there isn't an easy option for a front/rear combo that will plug into an ebike battery. ( preferably w/out something to drop from 48v to 12v, which I know is an ok option, but just another bit to dangle off the frame )

Obviously you can just run rechargeables...I guess that's ok, but seems silly when there is a huge battery on the frame that gets charged already!

Thanks in advance.
 

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I can find cheap front lights, but stumped why there isn't an easy option for a front/rear combo that will plug into an ebike battery. ( preferably w/out something to drop from 48v to 12v, which I know is an ok option, but just another bit to dangle off the frame )

Obviously you can just run rechargeables...I guess that's ok, but seems silly when there is a huge battery on the frame that gets charged already!

Thanks in advance.
I own an ebike and was thinking along the same lines as well. I like the look of the Super Nova M99 Pro ( with remote control for high-low beam use ). The M99 Pro has some real power ( 1400 lumen high, 700 low ) Thing is, it's made to operate off of 12 volts. Yeah, you would likely need a step-down voltage regulator but I don't think something like that would take up a whole lot of space.

Personally, I'm happy using my usual self-contained lights. Besides I'm not so sure I like the idea of my light sapping energy from my ebike battery. True, I rarely run the ebike battery really low but since it's an ebike, carrying a lamp with a couple small 18650's ( built in ) is no big deal. I'm not going to stress out over the weight of a couple 18650's when the bike itself weighs close to 50lbs.

Anyway, if I was to do what you want to do I'd like go with the M99 Pro and then fine a way to wire it up. Here's a link to some other lamps that will work with ebikes. Personally, I own enough self-contained lamps ( front and rear ) to outlast the maximum distance ( 50 miles ) I might get when riding my ebike....AND...I have great low beam and high beam with remote use and very bright rear lights I can mount almost anywhere

Just keep in mind that if you use a lamp connected to the ebike battery it may limit how far you can ride when using the ebike. If the front lamp draws 15 watts of energy that is going to add up after 2-3 hrs of use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I own an ebike and was thinking along the same lines as well. I like the look of the Super Nova M99 Pro ( with remote control for high-low beam use ). The M99 Pro has some real power ( 1400 lumen high, 700 low ) Thing is, it's made to operate off of 12 volts. Yeah, you would likely need a step-down voltage regulator but I don't think something like that would take up a whole lot of space.

Personally, I'm happy using my usual self-contained lights. Besides I'm not so sure I like the idea of my light sapping energy from my ebike battery. True, I rarely run the ebike battery really low but since it's an ebike, carrying a lamp with a couple small 18650's ( built in ) is no big deal. I'm not going to stress out over the weight of a couple 18650's when the bike itself weighs close to 50lbs.

Anyway, if I was to do what you want to do I'd like go with the M99 Pro and then fine a way to wire it up. Here's a link to some other lamps that will work with ebikes. Personally, I own enough self-contained lamps ( front and rear ) to outlast the maximum distance ( 50 miles ) I might get when riding my ebike....AND...I have great low beam and high beam with remote use and very bright rear lights I can mount almost anywhere

Just keep in mind that if you use a lamp connected to the ebike battery it may limit how far you can ride when using the ebike. If the front lamp draws 15 watts of energy that is going to add up after 2-3 hrs of use.
Thanks Cat. Your post about your ebike was what got me to ask the question actually. I didn't think that the draw on the batteries would be that much ... but I guess it depends on how powerful the lights. I was thinking more "be seen" lights than "to see" lights -- safety only. Not really planning on riding in the dark too much.

Good thoughts either way.
 

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Power specs M99 Pro

I own an ebike and was thinking along the same lines as well. I like the look of the Super Nova M99 Pro ( with remote control for high-low beam use ). The M99 Pro has some real power ( 1400 lumen high, 700 low ) Thing is, it's made to operate off of 12 volts.[...]
Just keep in mind that if you use a lamp connected to the ebike battery it may limit how far you can ride when using the ebike. If the front lamp draws 15 watts of energy that is going to add up after 2-3 hrs of use.
[...]
Here's a link to some other lamps that will work with ebikes.
Cat, the M99 Pro (!) Version is for 24-60V Input and tolerates up to 75V. See here https://supernova-lights.com/en/products/e-bike-lights-45-kmh/m99-pro/ (scroll down to product details) or here https://supernova-lights.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/v0417_M99-PRO_web.pdf . All other M99 Versions (the "Mini" and the "Pure") are specified max 12V.

Whether i'd buy a lamp which consumes 24W (m99 pro!) for a non dimmable 1600lm high beam (dipped beam with 1100 lm @16W is in a good range), that's another question. Energy consumption of the "mini pro" products is much better (up to 16W, as they need to connected to the light ports and no motor provides more than 16W there), and the output is similar to the M99 Pro
Lupine plans to release (probably by the end of this year) a 45 km/h ebike light as well, but this one will be at least as costly as the M99 Pro but might have better energy efficiency.

in case of a regular 400-500 Wh ebike battery, 3 hours of 16W light is still only around 8-15% of the battery charge, so i wouldn't consider this as a big issue,

Also Busch & Müller (B&M), which you linked, has a high beam e-bike lamp (IQ-XM) in development with input voltage up to 48V, prototype shown on the last eurobike. https://r2-bike.com/BUSCH-MUeLLER-E-Bike-LED-Scheinwerfer-Lumotec-IQ-XM-fuer-E-25-StVZO. It's based on the IQ-XE/Ixon Space, which has 150 lux/500 lm (sphere tested at Lupine for a test in a bike mag) low beam at 7.5W consumption. Here https://www.4thebike.de/detail/index/sArticle/16697
it's specified with 80 lux low beam plus 120 Lux high beam at max 16W. Since B&M use less LEDs than Lupine or Supernova, this will probably have an output of ~900-1000 lm at max high beam...
However beeing B&M, it might take up to mid of 2020 until it will be on the market (for the ixon space took it ages from announcement to market release) available.
 

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Cat, the M99 Pro (!) Version is for 24-60V Input and tolerates up to 75V. See here https://supernova-lights.com/en/products/e-bike-lights-45-kmh/m99-pro/ (scroll down to product details) or here https://supernova-lights.com/en/products/e-bike-lights-45-kmh/m99-pro/ . All other M99 Versions (the "Mini" and the "Pure") are specified max 12V.

Whether i'd buy a lamp which consumes 24W (m99 pro!) for a non dimmable 1600lm high beam (dipped beam with 1100 lm @16W is in a good range), that's another question. Energy consumption of the "mini pro" products is much better (up to 16W, as they need to connected to the light ports and no motor provides more than 16W there), and the output is similar to the M99 Pro
Lupine plans to release (probably by the end of this year) a 45 km/h ebike light as well, but this one will be at least as costly as the M99 Pro but might have better energy efficiency.

in case of a regular 400-500 Wh ebike battery, 3 hours of 16W light is still only around 8-15% of the battery charge, so i wouldn't consider this as a big issue,

Also Busch & Müller (B&M), which you linked, has a high beam e-bike lamp (IQ-XM) in development with input voltage up to 48V, prototype shown on the last eurobike. https://r2-bike.com/BUSCH-MUeLLER-E-Bike-LED-Scheinwerfer-Lumotec-IQ-XM-fuer-E-25-StVZO. It's based on the IQ-XE/Ixon Space, which has 150 lux/500 lm (sphere tested at Lupine for a test in a bike mag) low beam at 7.5W consumption. Here https://www.4thebike.de/detail/index/sArticle/16697
it's specified with 80 lux low beam plus 120 Lux high beam at max 16W. Since B&M use less LEDs than Lupine or Supernova, this will probably have an output of ~900-1000 lm at max high beam...
However beeing B&M, it might take up to mid of 2020 until it will be on the market (for the ixon space took it ages from announcement to market release) available.
Thanks for all that info, especially about the M99 Pro. I'm always glad when someone chimes in who has the real skinny on the new stuff. Heck, if I bought one of those new lights I'd have no idea how to hook it up anyway. My ebike doesn't look like it has any extra power outlets. My Trek Conduit ebike does have a built in light that puts out a good amount of light ( ~ 400 lumen ). Sadly they built it into the head tube so it doesn't help you once you start doing turns. If I could figure a way to open it up I could ( in theory ) access the power from there.

No worries for me though. I have all the light I need when riding the ebike. BTW, do you know how much they are asking for the M99 Pro? If it's not more than $200 I might reconsider.
 

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Heck, if I bought one of those new lights I'd have no idea how to hook it up anyway. My ebike doesn't look like it has any extra power outlets. [...]
BTW, do you know how much they are asking for the M99 Pro? If it's not more than $200 I might reconsider.
Lights are usually either connected directly to the battery or to a light port, which is inside the e-motor housing.
Price is 449 Eur incl 19% VAT, if it's sold to a customer outside the EU, it should be 377 EUR. So far beyond your range. Mini Pro 25 is 299, Mini Pro 45 is 349 (all incl 19% VAT)
 

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Lights are usually either connected directly to the battery or to a light port, which is inside the e-motor housing.
Price is 449 Eur incl 19% VAT, if it's sold to a customer outside the EU, it should be 377 EUR. So far beyond your range. Mini Pro 25 is 299, Mini Pro 45 is 349 (all incl 19% VAT)
:yikes: Wow! 449 € !....that's over $500 USD...waaaay out of my range. I'd rather use the road version of the Outbound lights. I'd be doing that now but Outbound still has not produced a lamp with a remote control ( although I believe they hinted some time ago that they might be doing that with future editions....unless I'm wrong about that ).
 
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