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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A little gratuitous part porn plus rant on my part.

After years of searching under rocks and behind trees, I picked up a Schmolke TLO 560mm mtb bar. Like my sl it has a marked seam along it plus bare minimum use of exterior epoxy.

I have to wonder why Easton with their nano and CNT technologies cannot produce a similar or better bar. I mean how hard can it be for a relative giant in the industry to match the Schmolke brothers? The TLO is 30 grams lighter than Easton - common guys :mad: Grab some HMF fibers and some of that boron stuff Lew is using and viola :rolleyes: They can't do it.

I'll get my crash hat ready for riding this one :eek: :D
 

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Maybe because Easton are making bars intended for a larger market than those who would buy the Schmolke?

They may also have a reason NOT to make such a light bar - durability or something.
 

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No way 69 Grams...!!!!

Man I'm getting old...

I still remember the days when a Easton "Hyper light" was light..

So is this a Carbon/boron fibre composite, any data on the %'s, strand shapes & arrangments,,etc..!?!?

I did work with Boron and also carbon many years ago building airplanes, but then the price of boron was astronomical (even for a airplane company paying $3per each certified bolt) and we only use it for control cables (it works amazing under tension, makes Kevlar look heavy and weak) and weight sensitive areas but not much else, (Well I did make a slalom skateboard with longitudinal strands that was weightless and very nice to ride too)

How long of a life expectantly do they guess for this bars..!?!?

three months..!?

One race..!?!?

Anyway 69grams is nothing for a cylindrical object expose to so many forces..
 

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wrong choice...

may i say this was a bad buy?
you once wanted this bar as well and after talking to the guys selling Schmolke they suggested that at your weight you might stay clear of the TLO. but now if you fell good spending huge chunks of money to save 30g go ahead. i am not as heavy as you are and still would not invest such amounts in a simple straight handlebar. Schmolke just rips off the people and in your particular case it is definitely not a wise choice.

german fatigue tests showed several times that Schmolke has the capability to make very good and durable parts BUT 1 out of 3 bars failed badly after 1/5 of the duration of the test....spending huge amounts for 30g risky savings ? no thanks.

just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
patineto said:
No way 69 Grams...!!!!

So is this a Carbon/boron fibre composite, any data on the %'s, strand shapes & arrangments,,etc..!?!?
Here's some of schmolkes info.

"Extensive use of the latest IM-fibres with a tensile strength of 6370 N/mm² and an E-Module of 394000 N/mm²"

From their website:

"it ensures that the percentage of resin is brought down to an optimum of 35 % (OCLV quality), that is the strong fibres as backbones of the bars make up the largest part of the laminate. With the TLO line we managed to save yet another 20-30 grams off the already featherweight Superlight's weight. This is achieved by using only the latest IM-fibres with a tensile strength of 6370 N/mm² and an E-Module of 394000 N/mm². The elongation ar fracture is up by 50% when compared to more common fibres. Based on the resulting characteristics of fracture we were able to further reduce the bars wall thickness. Also the TLO handlebars do not need the aluminium sleeve to avoid turning in the stem. Unfortunately this fibre type does not come cheap, price is about three times as much as your average IM-fibre. The latest test of handlebars and stems in the July issue of the German "Tour" magazine proofs that the extra expense is well worthwhile. 11 combinations of stems and handlebars were tested with 100 000 load cycles- Four of the handlebars were durable enough to survive this torture, one of them was our 162 gram flyweight, the other three weighed in at a far less impressive 240 to 260 grams. "

I think they are referring to a road bar when mentioning 162 grams. Maybe you have some comments on their comments?

I'm not worried. Schmolkes been making these bars for years and I happen to be loosing weight myself.
 

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I think Easton is in the "mass marketer" position (if you'll pardon the pun) where they're selling bars to all sorts of ham fisted riders, as well as racers and shops, so they're making things as light as their lawyers will let them. I think Easton is working well within the bounds of engineering liability (300% safety factor) assuming that things will be mis-used and abused by the owners..

A boutique company like Schmolke can make things crazy light and sell them to people who are willing to undertake whatever risks might go with running very light components.

Being prone to the occasional bout of ham-fistedness, I'll stick with Easton's approach.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
rockyuphill said:
I think Easton is in the "mass marketer" position (if you'll pardon the pun) where they're selling bars to all sorts of ham fisted riders, as well as racers and shops, so they're making things as light as their lawyers will let them. I think Easton is working well within the bounds of engineering liability (300% safety factor) assuming that things will be mis-used and abused by the owners..

A boutique company like Schmolke can make things crazy light and sell them to people who are willing to undertake whatever risks might go with running very light components.
I think your comments as well as a few others here are true but what I am suggesting is Easton should create a Skunk Works division/brand like "Red" or something and investigate higher end fibers as well as boron reinforced fibers for a smaller harder core market. The products *should be* just as strong, lighter but more expensive.

Before long KCNC will be doing it instead of Easton :rolleyes:
 

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Nino, am I correct when it was the Syntace bars which did the best in the fatigue test?
Did they not also test this in Syntace's "lab"?
When I buy a carbon bar, I will not be going to Easton, but rather Syntace.
 

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Slobberdoggy said:
I think your comments as well as a few others here are true but what I am suggesting is Easton should create a Skunk Works division/brand like "Red" or something and investigate higher end fibers as well as boron reinforced fibers for a smaller harder core market. The products *should be* just as strong, lighter but more expensive.

Before long KCNC will be doing it instead of Easton :rolleyes:
Easton likely have developed all that stuff for the military. If that stuff got out in the real world as exotic material handlebars they'd probably have to kill you off, possibly with a convenient "accident", perhaps caused by handlebar failure at an inopportune time. :D
 

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How much does a tooth weigh? Think you might loose a few when the bar snaps.

It does not take much to build a light weight carbon bar, hell I'll start laying up some carbon and build sub 28g bars for $500 a pop. (just so long as there is no liability involved)
 

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Which rider weight and kind of use is the 69g version specified for? Probably it's made for a 130 pound marathon rider who never does only the tiniest drop. That does not mean that the bar will not withstand abuse (or normal use), but it does not do this with the same safety factor as other bars do. If you take a Schmolke version made for a 180 pound XC Racer with barends, you will have the same weight as Easton. This means that Easton is doing pretty well (especially if you consider that some of their bars have a purely cosmetic outer layer).
The Schmolke TLO is just for a veeeery small group of "riders".
 

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agreed...

karstb said:
Which rider weight and kind of use is the 69g version specified for? Probably it's made for a 130 pound marathon rider who never does only the tiniest drop. That does not mean that the bar will not withstand abuse (or normal use), but it does not do this with the same safety factor as other bars do. If you take a Schmolke version made for a 180 pound XC Racer with barends, you will have the same weight as Easton. This means that Easton is doing pretty well (especially if you consider that some of their bars have a purely cosmetic outer layer).
The Schmolke TLO is just for a veeeery small group of "riders".
Schmolke is talking about the fibres themselves which might fly to mars and back without any help BUT it's the combination of fibres and "glue" that make a bar good or bad. it's the craftmanship and by just looking at the picture i have to say i doubt the quality a little bit. just as BATAS already pointed out.
i also said SOME bars withstood these german tests but 1 out of 3 failed badly which is exactly what all of us don't want to happen: you CAN get a bar which fails.

i was asking for the TLO already back then and they highly recommended the SL instead. those guys wanted to make money as well and sure want to sell the most exotic stuff but when i told them about your profile they shook their heads. and as KARSTB above comments Easton bars have the same weight if not lower than those stupidly priced SLs as well. your bike will fall to the side just once, hitting the ground with the handlebars end...and it's toast. but at least it is lighter to pick up;) don't get me wrong - these are for sure sweet bars.

anyway - i would not want them also because of the 6 degree bend. i prefer 3 degrees and some money in the pocket.
 

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nino said:
Schmolke [snip] those stupidly priced SLs as well. your bike will fall to the side just once, hitting the ground with the handlebars end...and it's toast..
This actually happened to a friend of mine. And he wasn't even using bar ends. The bike was leaning against his car, and then it tipped over onto the gravel, and CRUNCH!, the bar was badly crushed and had to be discarded.

Ole.
 
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