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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey guys, im new here. i been staying in the newb section and doin alot of searching.
everyone keeps suggesting me to come into this forum for ur suggestions on what type of bike to get for east bay riding.

I want something for the trails around here. I see guys doing jumps and stuff,thats too extreme for me. i can see myself doing little jumps and drop offs, just a few feet though.

I want to do alot of trail riding and will be riding it to work and back sometimes for fun. i dont think i can get a good FS bike for my budget, and i dont know if its needed for our area. So a hard tail is my best bet from what i hear.

i have a 800 dollar budget or so.

My LBS had no real good info for me i need to check out livermore cyclery next. where should i buy and suggestions on the type of bike for the area???

Big thanks in advance.
 

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I can't give you much help on a bike for your specific area but based on your budget of $800 you will get way more bang for your buck buying a used bike.

I would suggest you look around for used bikes on craiglist, ebay, etc and when you see something that interests you, post the details here for comment. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, i was thinkin the exact thing!
i saw some yeti asx on here for 850 that was close to me, with fox shox up front. but not sure if that full suspension bike would be good for around here or not.
it had like 200 views and no buyers which was odd to me.
from what i read about it, it seems to be more of a DH bike, not well for climbing or trails???
 

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aka baycat
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ASX is more of a freeride bike, heavy too.

Shop around and see what fits your budget and get some test rides in, especially on dirt. Some bike shops host Demo Days where you can ride the bikes at a local trail system.

Look at a hardtail for that price with some disc brakes and a nice suspension fork. Buy new from a shop so they can help you with setup and maintenance. Check out Giant and Specialized or some other big name brands since you get a lot of bang for your buck when it comes to components.
 

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Paper or plastic?
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baycat said:
ASX is more of a freeride bike, heavy too.

Shop around and see what fits your budget and get some test rides in, especially on dirt. Some bike shops host Demo Days where you can ride the bikes at a local trail system.

Look at a hardtail for that price with some disc brakes and a nice suspension fork. Buy new from a shop so they can help you with setup and maintenance. Check out Giant and Specialized or some other big name brands since you get a lot of bang for your buck when it comes to components.
I second the suggestion. Get a hardtail with disc brakes. Ride the pi$$ out of it, and when you're ready, upgrade to whatever fits your riding style. Everything can be ridden on a hardtail in the east bay.
 

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Used hardtail... Anyone (or bike shop) that says you need a full suspension for anything in the east bay is full of crap. Get a used hardtail with 80-100mm fork, disc brakes. learn how to ride the east bay trails, upgrade over time what you feel needs upgrading, and go from there. If after a year or so, save your money and then upgrade to a full suspension if you so desire.
 

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If you are riding in the east bay on a trail that would be best with full suspension, you are doing something illegal. But, it might be nice to have full suspension to start with so you won't need to buy a new bike six or twelve months later.
 

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bicycle rider
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EBrider said:
If you are riding in the east bay on a trail that would be best with full suspension, you are doing something illegal. But, it might be nice to have full suspension to start with so you won't need to buy a new bike six or twelve months later.
Chaparral in JMP is best with FS, and it's legal. But yeah.

Original poster; get a hardtail with disc brakes. Better yet, get a single speed hardtail with disc brakes. I spent way more than $800 on one and it's almost the only bike I ride here, in the East Bay.

Merry Christmas and stuff,

Morgan
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
JayTee said:
Dude if you could come up with just a couple hundred more bucks I found these sweet deals on craigslit!

http://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/bik/1511175140.html

http://sfbay.craigslist.org/sfc/bik/1509083205.html

Both are great for Bay Area riding and who knows maybe you could talk them down to $800?
Thanks for lookin, if they were my size, id jump on them!
just so u all know, im hardly 5'5" :(

morganfletcher said:
Chaparral in JMP is best with FS, and it's legal. But yeah.

Original poster; get a hardtail with disc brakes. Better yet, get a single speed hardtail with disc brakes. I spent way more than $800 on one and it's almost the only bike I ride here, in the East Bay.

Merry Christmas and stuff,

Morgan
im not sure about the whole single speed thing yet. and why id want to be limited to a ss when i can shift. the only advantage i know of so far is weight, but i am not very picky. i need to read into it more
 

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Steedsta - as an old bike-shop guy and rider - I would also recommend the hardtail route - you'll get way more for your money and there really isn't much you need suspension for here. I have had a few suspension bikes, and like morganfletcher states, all I ride anymore is a fully-rigid SS (though the 29" wheels smooth a lot of the little stuff out very well). In the EB there is not a lot of legal stuff that you will take a big hit on, that needs more than a few inches of suspension to smooth out the cow tracks or ruts - and that is if you just want a cush ride.

Riding rigid slows me down in a couple of spots: Steep, rocky descents where you have to be on the brakes to control your speed (that is where a suspension fork will help the most) and on high speed rough-surfaced turns where you tend to "skitter" a bit. Suspension can help keep the tires on the ground a bit better. Rigid makes me ride more focused, look for the smooth lines and be more aware of what I am about to encounter than riding suspension and getting lazy does. It makes me go slower through the rougher places and if I do have a get-off I am less likely to bust up my old bones. I often keep up or am riding the rear wheel of FS riders on smoother downhills as they hold me up. I also tend to out-climb anyone that is of a similar cardio-vascular capacity as the hardtail/rigid fork climbs so well. Chabot, Pleasanton Ridge, DelValle, JMP, Redwood, Tilden, etc... are all fine on rigid. So is Annadel, Wilder, Tam, Tamarancho, SDF, and about anywhere else I have been. Start off rigid, or at least hardtail to build the skills for seeking the smooth lines, then if you get FS you can go a bit faster on the rougher stuff if you want to.

Where in the EB are you? That might help with shop suggestions. Try to find a good shop that is reasonably close for service-related needs, unless you can do it yourself. If you are newer to this a good shop will have an employee or three that can give you tips, recommend trails and tires and parts, etc... Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
ATBScott said:
Steedsta - as an old bike-shop guy and rider - I would also recommend the hardtail route - you'll get way more for your money and there really isn't much you need suspension for here. I have had a few suspension bikes, and like morganfletcher states, all I ride anymore is a fully-rigid SS (though the 29" wheels smooth a lot of the little stuff out very well). In the EB there is not a lot of legal stuff that you will take a big hit on, that needs more than a few inches of suspension to smooth out the cow tracks or ruts - and that is if you just want a cush ride.

Riding rigid slows me down in a couple of spots: Steep, rocky descents where you have to be on the brakes to control your speed (that is where a suspension fork will help the most) and on high speed rough-surfaced turns where you tend to "skitter" a bit. Suspension can help keep the tires on the ground a bit better. Rigid makes me ride more focused, look for the smooth lines and be more aware of what I am about to encounter than riding suspension and getting lazy does. It makes me go slower through the rougher places and if I do have a get-off I am less likely to bust up my old bones. I often keep up or am riding the rear wheel of FS riders on smoother downhills as they hold me up. I also tend to out-climb anyone that is of a similar cardio-vascular capacity as the hardtail/rigid fork climbs so well. Chabot, Pleasanton Ridge, DelValle, JMP, Redwood, Tilden, etc... are all fine on rigid. So is Annadel, Wilder, Tam, Tamarancho, SDF, and about anywhere else I have been. Start off rigid, or at least hardtail to build the skills for seeking the smooth lines, then if you get FS you can go a bit faster on the rougher stuff if you want to.

Where in the EB are you? That might help with shop suggestions. Try to find a good shop that is reasonably close for service-related needs, unless you can do it yourself. If you are newer to this a good shop will have an employee or three that can give you tips, recommend trails and tires and parts, etc... Good luck.
WOW! great write up. thanks. I am in tracy, the faaaarr east bay! i love tracy, being in the center of it all. close to the bay area and the mountains to the east.
as for labor, i would learn to do it myself, my friend use to ride mtb alot and built his own stand and stuff and did it himself. I tend to trust my work more so than paying shops to do it. i do the work on all my vehicles and motorcycles too.

now i have more options in bikes to confuse me!! :eek:
 

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Ariolimax columbianus
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+1 hardtail or rigid

get a cross bike or 29er if you can fit, maybe even a 650b if you can find one. ride a lot, improve your skills, increase your fitness, have fun. learn some of the mixed road + dirt routes around del valle + morgan territory. i think there might even be some stuff @ los vaqueros?

learn how to work on old school bikes and parts, there's a ton of stuff from the 80's & 90's that still runs great all over craigslist, ebay, local garage sales. with that budget you could most likely grab a nice old school hardtail....think steel....and still have money left over to buy some tools to go at it. pretty soon you'll end up having your own personal bike shop like the rest of us.
 

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With respect, ignore ATB Scott and Morgan rigid input.

They are very highly skilled riders and their solution is the consequence of many, many (in the case of ATB Scott many,many, many:D ) years of riding. Unless you have that their input about riding rigid is useless to you. If you had that skill level you would not be posting this question.

HT, non-rigid fork. V-brakes are okay if you have the skills but disc brakes would be better.
 

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Well, once I found my readin' glasses and got my hemmorhoid pad out so I could sit down and read this thing Mikey... I have one argument for your "non-rigid" recommendation... Many many many years ago, when I had no experience riding off-road, we all started on rigid bikes - that is all there was. We had to find the rideable line down stuff. (Actually, I think if the 7 - 8 inch bikes that exist now were available when I was a younger man I would probably not have survived to where I am today - with highly degraded skills from where I once was...) My first squishy fork - all 1.8" of travel - was a revalation. That said, I think a lot of the low-to-medium speed skills we all developed were because of the rigid ride. If you start there, you will find the lines and the way to ride the trail. Speed and smoothness develop and pretty soon you are railing the trails. Add a suspension fork, and in some places you will go faster. Full suspension will allow you to go even faster in other places. For jumping, making speed through rock gardens and down step-like terrain - you can't beat a FS bike. I still think that putting in some time on a rigid bike will make you a better rider. Then add a fork... You'll most likely find your best shot at a good deal on a hardtail with a fork, and I will agree with the rec to get disc brakes. Mainly because of the all-condition performance - rim brakes can SUCK when they get wet and muddy. Discs are barely affected.
 

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Berkeley Mike said:
They are very highly skilled riders and their solution is the consequence of many, many (in the case of ATB Scott many,many, many:D ) years of riding. Unless you have that their input about riding rigid is useless to you. If you had that skill level you would not be posting this question.

HT, non-rigid fork. V-brakes are okay if you have the skills but disc brakes would be better.
Let the record show I didn't recommend a rigid fork, just a hardtail. I ride with a 100mm Reba up front and it's might fine. I have a SS with a rigid fork, but it's not as much fun. Does climb well and makes you pick good lines.

Morgan
 
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