Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 105 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive ridden road for 5 years and have always clipped in. HAd one wreck so far but for the life of me, cannot fathom clipping in on my Fuel. Washing the front out on a slick right hander with watermelon size rocks below is out when I know I might not can get my foot down.

I know I am giving up time to my buddies by riding platforms and I also know that its the best thing to do but dang.

Eggbeaters?
Shimano?

Help! :madman:
 

·
Torque me. Make me spin!
Joined
·
69 Posts
C_Heath said:
Ive ridden road for 5 years and have always clipped in. HAd one wreck so far but for the life of me, cannot fathom clipping in on my Fuel. Washing the front out on a slick right hander with watermelon size rocks below is out when I know I might not can get my foot down.

I know I am giving up time to my buddies by riding platforms and I also know that its the best thing to do but dang.

Eggbeaters?
Shimano?

Help! :madman:
ASWR: CODA Shimano wannabes with clip-in parts missing!
 

·
Elitest thrill junkie
Joined
·
40,330 Posts
My shimano 657s (good pedals for clipless beginners too) are excellent in this regard.

My eggbeaters/mallets were always inconsistant. If you tried to twist your heel inwards they wouldn't release. They seem to only release by twisting your heel outwards. This may be due to the limited amount of movement possible when you try to move your heel inward (crank arm or other structure blocking you). They are controlled by angular movement with the crank brothers, which means you HAVE to move them a certain amount of degrees before they unclip. The fact that the cleats wore down fast made them unpredictable too, sometimes they'd release when I didn't expect them, which leads to bloody knees from smacking the handlebars/controls.

The shimano pedals use a spring that controls the release, while the movement to release is somewhat similer, spring tension is more the deciding factor instead of angular movement, meaning you can "unclip" easier (or you can unclip in some situations that would be impossible with the CB pedals). Not to mention the fact that you can SET this spring tension, whereas you have no option with the crank brothers. Unclipping when you don't want to is just as bad as not being able to unclip, as it leads to lacerations and other bad things. The crank brother's mechanism also contributes to unwanted unclipping events when you slam the bottom of the pedal against a rock. It simply "opens" the top mechanism when you compress the bottom one (by hitting it on a rock).

The other thing is clipping in. If you haven't use clipless pedals you may think that unclipping is the hard part, but you'll get it down in no time. Practice and do NOT ride the hardest trails right away, you need to go somewhere with a soft field to practice unclipping. The thing is that it becomes natural and you get used to it. I unclip without concious thought. On the other hand, clipping back in can be difficult, and trying to ride in nasty technical sections without being clipped in is a recipe for a crash. Some beginners (to clipless) think that they should ride unclipped through technical sections, but that's simply asking to crash. You have to ride through any technical section with enough inertia to roll over the obstacles, and then being clipped in helps immensely with your balance and control, so you can keep rolling over those obstacles. It's much more likely to crash on flats. The guys riding DH or freeride bikes on flats are doing big big drops or jumps or riding on skinnies where they need to be able to jump off the bike if necessary. Realize that many people DH and freeride with clipless pedals, and in those technical rock garden sections you'll still get better control with clipless, due to a better interface.

So the real challenging part is clipping back in after stopping in a technical section or steep uphill section. The eggbeaters were "ok" in this regard, but the mallets required you to sort of "roll" your foot across the platform to engage the pedal mechanism, this was usually sucessfull, but sometimes my foot would go flying off the pedal because it didn't engage. With a shimano pedal you can put your foot squarely on the pedal and your foot will "find" the mechanism, requiring little additional effort. The mallets required extra effort to get clipped back in. In this regard though, a bigger platform-type clipless pedal is usually a good idea for inexperienced (to clipless) riders. Shimano 434s, 545s and 647s are good ideas in this regard. They are a little more stable and confidence inspiring than the smaller pedals.

I won't ever agree that the crank brother's pedals (eggbeater type mechanism that is found in all their pedals) are easier to unclip, they are quite a bit more inconsistant due to a few factors, and there is zero adjustability. They are light, but far from reliable in my experience (multiple breakages and failures). They do have a fairly "easy" exit in terms of force required, but as I said before, it's all about the angle, if you don't get to that angle you won't come out, and you can adjust the tension on other pedals anyhow.
 

·
*Contents Under Pressure
Joined
·
352 Posts
Eggbeaters were my first clipless pedals and after one year of use (abuse?) they have held up fantastically. I like the simple interface that the eggbeaters present and my unclipping has also become second nature. I would highly recommend the eggbeater, candy, or smarty pedal from CB. plus they are super cheap :D
 

·
noMAD man
Joined
·
12,227 Posts
Jayem summed it up pretty well. Only pedals that have adjustable tension mechanisms that truly affect the release will be easy to get out of...and Crank Bros. systems require the cleat to move a given number of degrees before release will occur...period. That doesn't mean Crank Bros. pedals are bad. I'll differ with Jayem a bit on his take on the performance of Crank Bros. pedals, but his results are probably exactly what he experienced. Pedal style/design can vary for different riders. Shimano and other Shimano clone models are hands down the easiest pedals to get out of if you adjust them properly, yet they retain the cleat with high integrity...if you adjust them properly. Crank Bros. and similar designs work very well for many riders once you get used to the release design. Like Jayem, I use the Shimano 647's with excellent results. They give you a useable platform and a nice adjustable pedal. The platform is not really that suitable for replacing flat pedals by any means, but they do make it easier to reacquire the pedal to clip in, and they give you better support until you do get clipped back in.
 

·
Ride and Smile
Joined
·
736 Posts
I've used time, eggbeaters, acids and now use shimanos. Liked the weight of the eggbeaters and acids but started having trouble getting out especially when pulling on the upstroke. No problems at all with the shimano. Never had problems getting in but I'm happy with everything but the extra weight of the shimanos
 

·
I wonder why?
Joined
·
552 Posts
Shimano with multi-directional cleats (SH-55 or SH 56) depending upon the pedal.

By far the easiest to exit in panic situations.

i1dry?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,958 Posts
So going from road back to mountain, I was pretty hesitant about clipless. So I picked up a hybrid pedal with SPD on one side and platform on the other.

This worked for the first couple of rides. But I soon found that with the spring tension dialed way back, I can clip out very easily. almost too easily. Then I found it a pain to try to clip in on the fly if I started on the platform. I spent lots of time and energy fiddling with the pedals rather than concentrating on the ride.

After several rides, clipping out came pretty naturally. In the meantime, I was having troubling clipping in again because of the mud I was packing into the pedals.

So I just picked up a new set of SPD only pedals. M542...basic model.

I do find that I can be clipped in over obstacles and have developed the reflexes to clip out for a panic foot down. Also, I wear these dorky knee pads for rollerblading as a safety net.
 

·
a.k.a. BicycleKicks
Joined
·
1,138 Posts
Shimano XTR

axolotl said:
I've used time, eggbeaters, acids and now use shimanos. Liked the weight of the eggbeaters and acids but started having trouble getting out especially when pulling on the upstroke. No problems at all with the shimano. Never had problems getting in but I'm happy with everything but the extra weight of the shimanos
^^ agree ^^

I have found that my XTR's set with a low spring tension are easier to get out of than my eggbeaters or Candies. Actually, maybe the word "easier" should be replaced with "faster". The lower release angle makes it faster in my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
i1dry said:
Shimano with multi-directional cleats (SH-55 or SH 56) depending upon the pedal.

By far the easiest to exit in panic situations.

i1dry?
I'm on these right now, very good for quick release. Perfect way for a noob(such as me) to try clipless. I'm using these with shimano PD-M520
 

·
Yes, that's fonetic
Joined
·
3,893 Posts
:madman:
i1dry said:
Shimano with multi-directional cleats (SH-55 or SH 56) depending upon the pedal.

By far the easiest to exit in panic situations.

i1dry?
I've been on Shimano clipless since the 737s came out in the early '90s and it's now like riding flats. I have no problem hitting gaps or riding skinnys...very easy to disengage without thinking. I find the multi-directional cleats too easy to come out though. It's hard to bunny hop without them releasing. I stick with the uni-directional cleats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
i'm new to clipless ,and i went to candy c's...was soo worried about getting out. not one problem getting out at all.it's getting in that took a few rides to get down well.with the candies small platform it makes it nice,i can still ride while "finding" the cleat.

all in all i wish i went clipless sooner since you allready ride them on the road you know the upside to them... good luck with your decision
 

·
sofa king awsm
Joined
·
645 Posts
whodaphuck said:
:madman:
I've been on Shimano clipless since the 737s came out in the early '90s and it's now like riding flats. I have no problem hitting gaps or riding skinnys...very easy to disengage without thinking. I find the multi-directional cleats too easy to come out though. It's hard to bunny hop without them releasing. I stick with the uni-directional cleats.
I be planning to go clipless. Eyes already gots the pedals (M540) with the uni-directional cleat. Just need to get teh shoes. Do the uni-directionals release if you crash? Or should I start with the multirelease being a newb in my late 30's.
:confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
I am a SPD n00b and i have had eggbeaters and recently the M647 DX shimano spds. The Shimano DX pedals are by far the easiest pedals to unclip in since you can adjust the tension. It is already easy with single release cleats and even easier with multiple release cleats. Absolutely recommended if you want to get started on clipless.
 
1 - 20 of 105 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top