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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I"m coming off of a carbon Sworks Stumpjumper with the Brain shock. Not everyone knows how to setup a Brain Shock correctly so I'm sure everyone has heard complaints about it. However I've had mine dialed in really well for awhile now and it rides incredible. Every pedal stroke makes the bike jump foward and I think its because of the brain. Mixed with the incredibly active Horst Link FSR rear suspension the Stumpjumper has been a great bike for me.

Saying that, the Stumpjumper is only 120mm of rear travel and I've wanted something a bit more. I'm likely pulling the trigger on a new Mojo SL frame next week. I've heard all of the raving about the DW link rear suspension and how it pedals so well and feels bottomless.

Is it really going to feel that much better? Does the DW link suspension really work that well for pedaling and trail riding? Is it lively on the trail? Does it pop off of lips and flick around easily? I do mostly Trail riding with a little bit of Mild All Mountain stuff thrown in. Not a whole lot of pure XC stuff but sometimes there's no choice. I usually sit in the saddle and spin, and like to rip descents and do drops, pop off of lips, and small jumps. I weigh 185 pounds

I'll have the bike setup like this;

Mojo SL X-Large frame with Thomson 80mm Stem
Fox RP23 Shock
07 Talas RLC (set at 140 most of the time)
XTR Crankset
WTB Laserdisc Trail wheels with DTSwiss 370 hubs (1950 gram wheels)
Mutanoraptor 2.4 tires (high volume/lightweight XC/AM tires)
Joplin Seatdropper
Easton monkeylite bars
Hayes Stroker Trails disc brakes 7" rotors


The only thing I'm swapping out is the frame from my 6.6ilb Stumpjumper XL frame (only main triangle is carbon). Just curious as what to expect, I really like the stumpjumper but am hoping the Mojo will be that much better.
 

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To me the setback post and 80mm stem would feel long on the XL, especially for drops, jumps, etc.
I have a 65mm stem and straight post and considered going to a 50mm. But I'm also running a 29.5" bar which helps.
Oh, and the bike feels great with a 160mm fork too...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
c-wal said:
To me the setback post and 80mm stem would feel long on the XL, especially for drops, jumps, etc.
I have a 65mm stem and straight post and considered going to a 50mm. But I'm also running a 29.5" bar which helps.
Oh, and the bike feels great with a 160mm fork too...
Yeah I'm not realy fond of the setback post but its all the Joplin comes in and I can just scoot the seat foward to compensate. I'm running an 18mm longer Top Tube Stumpjumper XL with a 75mm stem. So I'm figuring just the 13mm difference is going to make the bike feel way smaller that what I"m used to. Maybe I'll try the 75mm that I have and see how that feels first before I order the Thomson. Im 6'2" with a 34" inseam. I'll definitely feel it out when I get it together but I do a lot of Trail riding so I need something that can do steep climbs, descents, and flat stuff. If I go too short it will suffer on the climbs just a tad too much but I'll definetly be keeping that in mind, I dig the shorter stems

Yeah I'd love a 160mm talas 36 but its not in the budget quite yet.
 

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Mojo...

Once you get the Mojo dialled in, you will see just what all the enthusiasm is about from those of us who already own this bike.

R.
 

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I had a gravity dropper from a previous bike so I just installed a shim.
I'm 6'3"+ with a 35 inch inseam, so we have similar dimensions. It comes down to what you're used to/comfortable with.
BTW the XL Mojo (non SL) w/Lopes Link, seat clamp, etc was about the same weight as your Stumpjumper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Rainman said:
Once you get the Mojo dialled in, you will see just what all the enthusiasm is about from those of us who already own this bike.

R.
So whats involved dialing it in? I figure on technical trails just leave the propedal off, and on flat smooth stuff crank it to 1 or 2 depending.

That just leaves rebound and air pressure, how does DW like to be setup in these regards? I think I can figure out rebound but what kind of sag/air pressure does DW like to work with?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
c-wal said:
I had a gravity dropper from a previous bike so I just installed a shim.
I'm 6'3"+ with a 35 inch inseam, so we have similar dimensions. It comes down to what you're used to/comfortable with.
BTW the XL Mojo (non SL) w/Lopes Link, seat clamp, etc was about the same weight as your Stumpjumper.
Yikes, thats scary considering the SJ had the brain on it(has some weight to it) and had an aluminum rear traingle.

Im getting the SL so hopefully that helps a bit :)

I'll likely be test riding one this weekend so I will be curious to see how the stem length/seat position comes into play, the shorter I can get away with the beter!
 

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Playing w/air pressures a bit I found that 10 to 15lbs less than my RTR weight worked pretty well for climbing non tech climbs and descending through rocks, and small jumps/drops. I had rebound set 2 clicks from the slowest setting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Okay cool, I'm running between 165-170 on my brain shock, so that sounds allmost exactly the same (just a coincidence) since I'm 185. I'll keep that as my baseline.

Do Mojo's run a bit deeper sag like some of the Turner DW"s do? Like 25-30%?
 

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I didn't care for how it rode with too much sag and that was with the recommended setup. Which is why I started playing with air pressure.
I haven't had a chance to spend any time on a dw Turner. Actually I picked up the used Mojo to get some time on a DW link bike before plunking down the coin on a dw spot. I've had two Turners, and would not hesitate to buy another - guess that makes me a homer...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
They're really nice bikes if aluminum is your thing. I do like welds :)

I just did some reading on the new Fox Boost Valve RP23, sounds like a nice addition to an already kick ass shock. Looks like it will work well for the Mojo. You don't have to run it wide open anymore to get it to be active. Looks like the Boost Valve is supposed to allow you to run Propedal #1 and not get any of the harshness from Propedal or feel the transition like you could on their older shocks. Where Propedal #3 was almost useless since it made the shock so harsh, etc etc. Eager to check that out!
 

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There was a post in the Turner forum about not using that shock on a dw spot. I think Push might be a better option.
They are also nice bikes if stiff is your thing too. I notice a difference but am pretty indifferent about it at this point.
Although I haven't had it for long - the mojo has been fun and I do like how the suspension performs.
 

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Coming from an 08 Stumpy Pro with brain here. And I spent tons of time dialing in the brain.

Initially I was not impressed with the Mojo. I did want more travel which was the main reason for the change. I didn't feel it climbed as well. But, now I've been on the Mojo for 10 months, and like it way more than I ever did the Stumpy. The Stumpy was nice, but there is just no comparison for me. Mojo actually climbs better IMO, especially over anything technical.

We did a trip to Moab last year, and I keep thinking back to how much more fun I would have had on the Mojo.

You will not be bummed with the Mojo. Make sure you get a white SL, they are figgin beautiful!

Sounds like I have drank some weird kool-aid to make me think the Mojo is the end-all bike... but it's really a friggin fantastic machine.

And if you get white and don't like it, I may take it off your hands....
 

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Yody said:
Okay cool, I'm running between 165-170 on my brain shock, so that sounds allmost exactly the same (just a coincidence) since I'm 185. I'll keep that as my baseline.

Do Mojo's run a bit deeper sag like some of the Turner DW"s do? Like 25-30%?
Once you get on the Mojo and start riding it, you are going to totally forget about that propedal lever. Seriously, unless you are riding on the road in the big ring in a full out of the saddle sprint, it's just not even something that most riders consider. The suspension is truly set it and forget it, Ronco style. heh

You can run the Mojo with as much sag as you are comfortable with, but you probably will find (like many dw-link riders have) that in dw-link world, there is no major detriment to running 30% or more sag. Running more sag is going to end up giving you more cornering and climbing traction especially on the rough stuff. If however, you want to run less sag, go for it. It's your preference. That's what makes your bike ideal for you and nobody else. Play with it and have fun.

You asked 4 questions in your first post. They were:

1) Is it really going to feel that much better?
2) Does the DW link suspension really work that well for pedaling and trail riding?
3) Is it lively on the trail?
4) Does it pop off of lips and flick around easily?

Here are the answers:

1) In my opinion, the difference is HUGE, and here is where you will notice it: first, successive square edge hits when you are climbing or accelerating. The Mojo is still going to accelerate efficiently, but is will still absorb the smallest bumps. AND second, high speed sweeping corners with mid corner bumps: The dw-link will react instantly to the bumps in the corners, and your bike will track more smoothly. This is really most noticeable at the limits of traction.

2) Yes, I would argue that there is no other system better suited, but don't take my word for it, give a test ride on a bike that's set up for you!

3) Yes, very. No extra low speed compression damping to slow things down. The dampers use juuuuust the right amount of LSC and no more.

4) Yup, like a champ. Take a look at a video of Lopes on A-Line at whistler.

Nothing is going to substitute for a test ride, so get out there and pedal!
 

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I've always called the brain a band-aid for a compromised rear suspension design, an effective band-aid but still a band-aid and when you start riding a mojo with the pro pedal off you'll know why. For the record I have two friends with mojo's I built up for them, but I ride an Epic, so I know all about the brain

You may be tempted to turn the pro pedal on, but I would suggest take one ride that has a lot of climbing and do not turn it on for the whole ride, then decide if you actually need it or not. The best part about the mojo is that it's design works great just about everywhere and you don't have to think about it. You won't think about your bike so much anymore and you'll be able to enjoy your ride more, a sign of a great bike. I hope you ordered the SL with rubber paint though. Of the two mojo's I ride with, the rubber paint one has held up a lot better and doesn't look as used
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
russya said:
I've always called the brain a band-aid for a compromised rear suspension design, an effective band-aid but still a band-aid and when you start riding a mojo with the pro pedal off you'll know why. For the record I have two friends with mojo's I built up for them, but I ride an Epic, so I know all about the brain

You may be tempted to turn the pro pedal on, but I would suggest take one ride that has a lot of climbing and do not turn it on for the whole ride, then decide if you actually need it or not. The best part about the mojo is that it's design works great just about everywhere and you don't have to think about it. You won't think about your bike so much anymore and you'll be able to enjoy your ride more, a sign of a great bike. I hope you ordered the SL with rubber paint though. Of the two mojo's I ride with, the rubber paint one has held up a lot better and doesn't look as used
Yeah, as sexy as the white is I'm looking at the rubber paint, one because it looks so dope, and 2 because it hopefully won't get as messed up.

The Brain might be a bandaid but it sure does work, technical or non technical it seems lilke the bike would just kinda hop along always moving foward, never felt sluggish or boat anchorish.

I'm in full understanding of not runnign the propedal, I ride mostly techy single track anyway. However with the new Boost Valve it seems as if they have managed to totally dial back the amount of compression that the shock uses making it much more mild. I know that most bikes that I had test ridden, putting it on even propedal #1 made it way too freakin stiff. Seems like this new boost valve RP23 is supposed to make the propedal circuit much more usable even on a great design like the Mojo.

I'm expecting to run it completely off on super techy climbing, but on firetrails and rides with mostly all climbing and boring descents I'll probably opt to click it over. Time will tell!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
_dw said:
Once you get on the Mojo and start riding it, you are going to totally forget about that propedal lever. Seriously, unless you are riding on the road in the big ring in a full out of the saddle sprint, it's just not even something that most riders consider. The suspension is truly set it and forget it, Ronco style. heh

You can run the Mojo with as much sag as you are comfortable with, but you probably will find (like many dw-link riders have) that in dw-link world, there is no major detriment to running 30% or more sag. Running more sag is going to end up giving you more cornering and climbing traction especially on the rough stuff. If however, you want to run less sag, go for it. It's your preference. That's what makes your bike ideal for you and nobody else. Play with it and have fun.

You asked 4 questions in your first post. They were:

1) Is it really going to feel that much better?
2) Does the DW link suspension really work that well for pedaling and trail riding?
3) Is it lively on the trail?
4) Does it pop off of lips and flick around easily?

Here are the answers:

1) In my opinion, the difference is HUGE, and here is where you will notice it: first, successive square edge hits when you are climbing or accelerating. The Mojo is still going to accelerate efficiently, but is will still absorb the smallest bumps. AND second, high speed sweeping corners with mid corner bumps: The dw-link will react instantly to the bumps in the corners, and your bike will track more smoothly. This is really most noticeable at the limits of traction.

2) Yes, I would argue that there is no other system better suited, but don't take my word for it, give a test ride on a bike that's set up for you!

3) Yes, very. No extra low speed compression damping to slow things down. The dampers use juuuuust the right amount of LSC and no more.

4) Yup, like a champ. Take a look at a video of Lopes on A-Line at whistler.

Nothing is going to substitute for a test ride, so get out there and pedal!
Thanks, I like the idea of having more traction over bumps midcorner, on my stumpy I'd always have to unweight the rear and "pump" the rear of the bike over bumps to keep traction.

I also like the idea of more sag, not only do I feel that will make the bike more plush but also on descending I like the idea of a more slack headtube.
 

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Yody said:
They're really nice bikes if aluminum is your thing. I do like welds :)

I just did some reading on the new Fox Boost Valve RP23, sounds like a nice addition to an already kick ass shock. Looks like it will work well for the Mojo. You don't have to run it wide open anymore to get it to be active. Looks like the Boost Valve is supposed to allow you to run Propedal #1 and not get any of the harshness from Propedal or feel the transition like you could on their older shocks. Where Propedal #3 was almost useless since it made the shock so harsh, etc etc. Eager to check that out!
My Mojo came with the Boost Valve shock and if the Mojo I rented to test had this shock on it, I would not have bought the Mojo. The Boost Valve restricts oil flow when you hit a square edge bump and is supposed to keep you from blowing through the mid range. It works fine until I get up to speed and try to lauch off of a rock or other item, then it kicks the back end up instead of pushing through the obstacle. Same thing in rock gardens at speed. Works kind of like a Brain Shock in reverse. I took the shock off and sent it to be Pushed yesterday. Hopefully it ends up riding more like the 09 shock that I rode on the Mojo before.
 

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I never use Pro Pedal. I am 180cm (5 11) and have a 100mm stem on a large frame. Despite that seeming long these days, I tend to feel I ride weight more middle to back (no dropper seat, but maybe a bit lower than XC height) and have always set sag at about 10mm rather than the recommended (?) 15mm. I find that gives me a little more life in the rear and I get full travel all the time anyway. I seem to keep my butt close to or on the saddle at almost all times. Wide bars and larger sticky rubber were made for this bike. I don't find the bike pops off things like a fairy; it is actually a little sluggish in the rear end due to active and plush suspension. But it flies over things that used to require little fancy pops. The better I get, the better it gets too.
 
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