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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
...and the front brake is toast. The brake fluid is crusted all around the brake lever and the brake doesn't work at all.

Would this indicate a blown seal? Is this a fairly easy repair, or should I have a shop do it?

Thanks in advance for any advice!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your reply. The brake itself is decent, at least it was in 2005, Hayes 9. It only had about a hundred miles on it, tops. I'd assume replacing the seals and fluid line would do the trick, wouldn't it?
 

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Thanks for your reply. The brake itself is decent, at least it was in 2005, Hayes 9. It only had about a hundred miles on it, tops. I'd assume replacing the seals and fluid line would do the trick, wouldn't it?
If you could find compatible seals, but that may be difficult. Honestly, I would not put time, effort and money in 14 year old hydro brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So I went to a couple LBS today and they said parts would be hard to get. One mechanic cool, the other a complete knob. A third LBS, not so sales oriented, said he'd see if he could find parts to rebuild. It's starting to look like I'll probably end up buying something new.


Are mechanical discs still relevant? Can I get use out of my existing levers and rotors?
 

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So I went to a couple LBS today and they said parts would be hard to get. One mechanic cool, the other a complete knob. A third LBS, not so sales oriented, said he'd see if he could find parts to rebuild. It's starting to look like I'll probably end up buying something new.

Are mechanical discs still relevant? Can I get use out of my existing levers and rotors?
Skip the mechanical brakes. Go with Puddleduck's recommendation, or one of the other lower end Shimanos. They're cheaper than decent mechs like the BB7 (which I used 20 years ago, and wouldn't go back to!) and they just work.
 

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Thanks for your reply. The brake itself is decent, at least it was in 2005, Hayes 9. It only had about a hundred miles on it, tops. I'd assume replacing the seals and fluid line would do the trick, wouldn't it?
I had a set of those brakes. IMHO you would be much further ahead to purchase a newer Shimano brake set. Even the low end Shimano set in the link that Puddleduck posted would be a major improvement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If they were mine, I'd clean them up with some alcohol, bleed them and see what happens. There's a decent chance they'll work fine. New brakes are nice too.
This first thought is appealing to me, as the brake hasn't seen a ton of trail time, but wouldn't the crusted fluid on the lever indicate the brake needs more work than just a bleed? I've found numerous listings on eBay for parts that would run around $20-30, depending on what specific parts I need.
 

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If you know how to maintain them, sure. If you can't find any specific instructions on maintainting Hayes 9 brakes, don't do it. You can just buy a deore, or SLX brakes pretty cheap on ebay for way below $100...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I found all the documentation to fix the brake on the Hayes website. There's a "shop" next town over that charges $5 to let you use their tools under the supervision of a master mechanic. They won't do the work for you, but will guide you through the job to ensure it's done correctly and encourage people to work on their own bikes.

Since I don't have torx wrenches, etc, it seems like a bargain price to learn how to do the job correctly, plus it looks like fun! I should be able to do this if I can change car brakes, shouldn't I?
 

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I found all the documentation to fix the brake on the Hayes website. There's a "shop" next town over that charges $5 to let you use their tools under the supervision of a master mechanic. They won't do the work for you, but will guide you through the job to ensure it's done correctly and encourage people to work on their own bikes.

Since I don't have torx wrenches, etc, it seems like a bargain price to learn how to do the job correctly, plus it looks like fun! I should be able to do this if I can change car brakes, shouldn't I?
that is very lucky. Here in Australia Bikeshop labours are expensive. If I were in your scenario, Id prolly try fixing it first as well.
hope ur brakes can work again
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Looks like I'm buying a new brake after all. In addition to a MC rebuild kit, I need a new bladder, which apparently isn't made anymore and not available anywhere online.

Time to start a new thread, haha
 
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