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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Riding along a local canal circumstances occurred that resulted in me launching, bike and all, into the water.

My hand built steel 29" frame was fully submerged for a second or two before floating for another minute or two. It has a large (1/8"?) drain hole under the cranks and a few tiny ones at chain stays.

Road it home and then dried it off as best I could. Hit the moving parts (except the cranks) with wd40 and then re-lubed.

It has been a week (hot & humid) and I have not noticed any hint of rust at the drain holes and everything is rolling smoothly and squeak free.

Any thoughts or suggestions on whether I should do more to remedy any potential damage from rust, aside from riding it hard and otherwise pleasing the steel bicycle gods, would be very much appreciated.

Thanks.

PS: Steel is, and always shall be, real.

:)
 

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...remove seatpost at least, twirl bike slowly. Then I would carefully blow dry into. Also remove fork aside if Htube open to D&Ttube to vent same time. Keep in driest indoor environ, let it watch the Tour on TV. Later regrease Hset bearings since you have access...any or all other grease/bearing areas check too. Same degree as a build if need (hubs, etc...) for time bike spent in water; two minutes floating, long time.

Lube or treat given opportunity LATER still, once you're sure frame et al is moisture free, fully dry.
 

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too cold to ride
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If you have a video of said incident, post it. It will be helpful, I promise.

(j/k, of course)
 

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BM and PQ Trail Rep
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I would not worry to much about the frame. Bikes have been made of steel for a long, long time before carbon, aluminum, magnesium, and unobtainium. They got wet, and most did not die. You sound like you gave it more care than a average user back in the day.

Just to put it into perspective, take a look at the old cyclocross races. Those were steel bikes that spent lots of time in water, mud, and muck. Do you think they were worried about the frame's integrity due to moisture?

I also agree with the above posts about checking your bearings. Hub, headsets and bottom brackets probably should be cleaned out and re-lubed unless you are running boat trailer axle grease.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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Drum said:
hand built steel
Boutique steel, right? Like Reynolds or Columbus?

It corrodes very, very slowly. Follow the above suggestions if you like - you certainly wouldn't be hurting anything - but don't worry about it too much. In order to get higher-end steels to corrode, you need them to be either dirty, so they stay wet for a long time, or in the presence of a catalyst, like salt. That's why cars rust out quickly at the beach or in an alkali desert but last decades in environments where they're far from the ocean and the roads aren't salted in the winter. The paint doesn't hurt, of course...
 
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