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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a little over 6'. I've got a 19" Rockhopper. I've noticed in a lot of the photos I've seen, the saddle sits higher than the handlebar (probably a outdated term.) My saddle sits lower than that, and when sitting on the saddle, my feet are not flat on the ground...I'm on my toes. At this height, my knee is slightly bent when pedal is cranked down. (which is the guide the guy at my lbs used)

Should I be able to have both feet flat on the ground while in the saddle, or is reaching the ground only with my toes typical.

Sorry for the dumb question, but thanks in advance for any advice.
 

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Sounds about right, seat height wise.

With the development of Freeride, Downhill, and Hucking there is a tendancy to set the bars higher than in the old days( 3 years ago.) These disciplines rely on weight-back to deal with gravity line riding. For new riders this can be more comfortable as they haven't developed the musculature to handle a more forward and down committed position which is more prevalent in XC riding. It is also more psychically comfortable as it leaves one in a position more behind the bars during technical downhills or encountering obsticals at speed and reduces that sense of fear of going over the bars. As skills increase this is no longer needed for XC.
I am not sure why your bars ar as high as they are but you might experiment with a lower position when you feel able. Often your bar can be lowered by moving spacers out of the stack below the stem and putting them above. Bar position can also be changed by changing stems, the amount of rise in a riser bar, or going to a flat bar. However, these all cost money unless you can borrow them from a friend or your LBS. In any case don't do it all at once and give it some riding time before you make up your mind.
OR you present position could be perfect for you.
 

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I just switched to riser bars

Not a dumb question. I switched back to riser bars to get a slightly more upright riding position, but it depends mostly on what type of riding you are doing, and perhaps the travel setting on your fork. If you ride mostly XC, you will likely want the saddle and bars at the same height. More All Mountain and aggressive trail riding would likely mean higher bars.
I'll let you know how the riser bars are working out after the snow clears and the temp gets above 35 for a couple of days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Clarification....hopefully

I guess my question should have been focused more upon whether a person should be able to firmly plant a foot flat on the ground while standing at a stop and sitting on the saddle. As my setup is currently, I'm on my toes trying to reach the ground while sittling on the saddle while standing still.

As far as my question about the saddle height relative to handle bar height, I've just noticed a lot of photos where it looks like the saddle sits higher than the height of the handlebar.

Thanks for the input. Let me know what you think.
 

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if your saddle is properly heigh adjusted (almost full leg extension when pedal is all the way down), you should NOT be able to mount the bike from the ground right onto the saddle. you step over the top tube and straddle the bike. then step onto a pedal in an upper position so as you step on it the bike moves forward and you go up and onto the seat.

thats for the most effecient leg stroke. sometimes though you might want to lower the saddle a bit for more technical things or jumps, etc.

but in short, what your describing sounds normal
 

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Cat's Pajamas said:
I guess my question should have been focused more upon whether a person should be able to firmly plant a foot flat on the ground while standing at a stop and sitting on the saddle.
I don't think that it matters much if your feet are flat on the ground or not. Just as long as when you are off the saddle your stuff doesn't hit the top bar. I like extra frame space in case I have to dismount on strange terrain so I don't get hurt.
 

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HuffyMan said:
if your saddle is properly heigh adjusted (almost full leg extension when pedal is all the way down), you should NOT be able to mount the bike from the ground right onto the saddle. you step over the top tube and straddle the bike. then step onto a pedal in an upper position so as you step on it the bike moves forward and you go up and onto the seat. ...
It doesn't matter how you start riding. Sometimes I do as you describe, sometimes I clip in on one side swing my leg over while either pushing down the cliped in foot or pushing the other foot so the bike starts rolling and sit on the saddle and clip in on the other side and sometimes I run and jump on the saddle. Just be careful when you jump. You don't want to land on your boys. :D
 

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While sitting on the saddle with your foot (with the peddal all the way down) on the lower pedal your knee should be slightly bent. this will give you the most power while riding and the least amount of knee strain. That said, for stunts and /or downhill most people like the seat lowered. So if your sitting and your feet can touch the ground the seat is too low
 

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dan0 said:
on the lower pedal your knee should be slightly bent. this will give you the most power while riding and the least amount of knee strain
This bit of advice is very sound. While not knowing exactly what you are doing in terms of riding, be very attentive to getting the height correct. Too low can really cause you knee problems over the long term. If you meet an experienced rider on the trails, why not stop and ask them for assistance.

As long as we've mentioned your knees, pay attention to your cadence (pedal RPM). Keep it as high as you can. I know that you can't always keep it high in all offroad situations, but endeavor to go up that hill in a lower gear at a higher spin than vice-versa.

I've been riding many years without problems and intend to keep it that way.

Penguin
 
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