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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got my razorback all built up and rode it this morning. It's my first fs bike. When I ride, I don't really notice bob too much. However, for kicks, I thought I'd try it locked out. Well, I can't figure out which is locked out and which isn't. Maybe I'm not a very sensitive rider, but I don't notice a difference. Do you lock it out by turning the switch to the right (drive-train side) or to the left? Also, when I turn to the left, at one point, it clicks in and I can either leave it there or keep switching it to the left until it hits the shock like it does when it's flipped to the right. Do I keep it in the clicked in position (assuming that this is the direction to switch when locking out) or do I move it all the way until it stops at the shock?
 

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The misunderstood blue lever....

The Fox Float RL pull-shocks for Razorbacks have different internals than versions with conventional mounting hardware. As a result the blue lever does not achieve the same "full lockout with emergency blow-off" that it does on other bikes. It's best to think of it as a very firm damping setting that significantly stiffens the suspension.

Another unique trait of the Fox Float RL pull-shock is that the indents on the blue lever go way completely at the extremely slow rebound end of the damping range. Not very many people ride the shock near this setting, but it can result in the blue lever flopping around a lot, leading people to think their shock is broken when it's perfectly fine. If you can't tell the difference between "open" and "firm", try experimenting with faster rebound damping settings - it should become more obvious.

The "open" position for the blue lever should be pointing back and to the drive-side/right of the bike. The "firm" position should be pointing back and to the non-drive/left side, but it will also feel firm in the forward position that Superbman refers to. The blue levers on Fox shocks now stop at the end of the usable positions, but all of them turned over a 360 degree arc until recently - not just the Razorback specific version.

Let us know what you find on your new build, and how it rides out on the trail.

Happy Trails,
T.K. Malone
K2 Bike
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thekid said:
The Fox Float RL pull-shocks for Razorbacks have different internals than versions with conventional mounting hardware. As a result the blue lever does not achieve the same "full lockout with emergency blow-off" that it does on other bikes. It's best to think of it as a very firm damping setting that significantly stiffens the suspension.

Another unique trait of the Fox Float RL pull-shock is that the indents on the blue lever go way completely at the extremely slow rebound end of the damping range. Not very many people ride the shock near this setting, but it can result in the blue lever flopping around a lot, leading people to think their shock is broken when it's perfectly fine. If you can't tell the difference between "open" and "firm", try experimenting with faster rebound damping settings - it should become more obvious.

The "open" position for the blue lever should be pointing back and to the drive-side/right of the bike. The "firm" position should be pointing back and to the non-drive/left side, but it will also feel firm in the forward position that Superbman refers to. The blue levers on Fox shocks now stop at the end of the usable positions, but all of them turned over a 360 degree arc until recently - not just the Razorback specific version.

Let us know what you find on your new build, and how it rides out on the trail.

Happy Trails,
T.K. Malone
K2 Bike
Thanks for you guys' help. So to lock it out, turn left until it clicks in or until it hits the body of the shock? I assume until it clicks in.

I'll post pics and a better review when I get more time (to ride and write). Quickly though, the first two rides were unimpressive. The second two rides were more impressive. I did one long single-track climb loop and did it 3 min faster than my faster time on my hardtail (of course the hardtail is probably 2-3 pounds heavier) then, 12 hours later I did a 14 mile loop from my house: 10 miles of paved road and about 4 of double track. This time I did it 30 seconds slower than my faster time on my hardtail. That's saying something considering 12 hours earlier I climbed 1000 ft.

My other bike is an old school Kona ('93 Lava Dome). It has a more stretched out feel. Right now, I feel that it had handles corners better than the K2 but this may just be because I'm still getting used to the geometry of the razorback.

So far, I definately feel that the razorback is a faster ride, which is fun but at the same time, I like the bumpiness of my hardtail, it seems like a funner ride. Again, I've only ridden a handful of times and don't have the suspension dialed in yet. Over the next few days I'm hoping to ride some more technical and challenging rides and see how I feel about the razorback and full suspension in general.

Again, thanks for all your help.
 
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