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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My guess here is no, but thought I'd ask. Can you thread a bmx freewheel on a track hub to replace a track cog? I'm thinking of picking up a cheapo fixie commuter/around town bike and just wanted to see if switching to a freewheel was an option. Thanks, S
 

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Steel and teeth.
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Not really...

shiggy said:
You can but it is not recommended because of the reduced width of the threads on the hub.
The decreased threads on a fixie hub shouldn't make a difference. This contact interface works well for a fixed gear and they undergo the same (if not more) torque as a freewheel. :confused:

Harris Cyclery (and Sheldon) even advertise the Surly dual fixed flip-flop hub as a freewheel or fixed option.

b1umb0y
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hmmm... clear as mud. ;)

The seller says that this fixie actually has a bmx FW hub with a track cog on it, so no problem running a freewheel. So... I guess I can interchange the FWs and cogs... I gueeesss...

The bike is cheap and worst case I blow up the rear wheel I guess. I'll give it a whirl! Thanks! S
 

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b1umb0y said:
The decreased threads on a fixie hub shouldn't make a difference. This contact interface works well for a fixed gear and they undergo the same (if not more) torque as a freewheel. :confused:

Harris Cyclery (and Sheldon) even advertise the Surly dual fixed flip-flop hub as a freewheel or fixed option.

b1umb0y
And other hub makers say don't do it.
 

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DSR said:
The seller says that this fixie actually has a bmx FW hub with a track cog on it, so no problem running a freewheel. So... I guess I can interchange the FWs and cogs... I gueeesss...
That almost certainly means that it is not a true fixed gear hub that can accomodate a proper (reverse threaded) lockring, in which case you'd be wise to only use freewheels on it.
 

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Steel and teeth.
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shiggy said:
And other hub makers say don't do it.
Sure... Nothing safer than a disclaimer. :D Out of curiosity... which ones?

Can you find a single post where someone used this set-up and had it fail. ;)

MTBR and RoadBikeReview have an extensive collection of known conflicts... :) If it is there, game point.

Of course, I think Sheldon's experience outweighs most by a few decades...
"Since both single speed and fixed gear hubs use the same 1.37 x 24 tpi threading, any fixed gear hub can also be used with a single speed freewheel. "

b1umb0y
 
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Hub threading

I to know of people running freewheels on fixed gear hubs with no problems. I think shiggy said it is not recomeded this is true it is not. The thread engagement is different on a fixed cog the whole cog fits on the threads the teeth are supported. On a freewheel the teeth portion of the freewheel stick out beyond these threads. That is the reason it is not recomended. Of course it will work but it is not the best way. You can wipe your a$$ with leaves if you have to but the best way is still to use toilet paper.
 

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surlysoul said:
Of course it will work but it is not the best way. You can wipe your a$$ with leaves if you have to but the best way is still to use toilet paper.
Kind of like using a 1/8" chain with 3/32" cogs and chainrings or making a fixed gear out of a disc hub and a drilled out DX cog?

Oh wait... several people have gotten that to work quite well. Although, I guess there are 'better' ways to do it. ;)

Huh... maybe the whole leaf and toilet paper analogy wasn't all that accurate.

b1umb0y
 

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People make all sorts of things work that are not recommended, including me.

I have seen the threads pull off of a FW-only hub using a FW and I have seen the threads strip on a fixed hub with a track cog.
 
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