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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Trying to order a set of china BTLOS carbon wheels for a Honzo build.

The options for free hubs are Shimano 9-11spd, SRAM XD, or Shimano Microspline.

Can someone tell me which I should be using?
 

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It depends on what cassette you are planning to run on the bike build. Do you have the drive train/cassette picked out already?
 

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If you're going to run Shimano 12spd cassette or one of their newer 11spd cassettes (ones w/ the 10T cog) - then Shimano Microspline.
If you go with "older" Shimano 11 speed or less -> Shimano HG freehub.
Modern SRAM cassette -> then obviously SRAM xD freehub.
Other cassettes (ie: Sunrace & others also offer HG & xD options for their cassettes)

Don't you just love all the different standards we have?
 

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Shimano 9-11 speed is what most SS cogs are made to fit. There's a converter that allows you to run a SS cog on an XD driver, but that's going about it the hard way. Not sure about microspline but most likely no SS cog on the market will fit.

Do you have any expectation that this wheel will ever see more than one gear?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Mack_Turtle thanks for replying. One gear is all it will ever be.

So once I choose Shimano 9-11spd freehub what else will I need besides the cog I plan to run? Im guessing spacers of some sort?
 

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Spacers and a cassette lockring. Some of these come in a kit. You can also use spacers salvaged from old cassettes (LBS might have a few lying around), spacers from a bottom bracket, or even carefully trimmed segments of PVC pipe.
 

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Don't you just love all the different standards we have?
Well, we really only had one for quite a long time. My understanding is that SRAM wouldn't license XD to Shimano, and since everybody wants a 10 tooth cog these days, they had to do something.

The old 'too many standards' argument is getting tired. I promise you that engineers don't actually get together and try to dream up new standards just for the sake of adding to the pile of old ones.
 

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The old 'too many standards' argument is getting tired. I promise you that engineers don't actually get together and try to dream up new standards just for the sake of adding to the pile of old ones.
You sure about that? That's exactly what Sram does. So does Trek, Specialized, Cannondale, E13, etc, the list goes on. Intentionally making products that only work with their own standards. That's why I won't buy those brands.
 

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Look, it's a matter of perspective, and SRAM's DUB standard is a good example of this.

Is the 28.99 thing a bit pedantic? Absolutely. But I 100% believe that they saw some sort of benefit by going to that spindle size. Will it be stiffer than a 24mm GXP spindle? Yes. Will the bearings be bigger than in a 30mm spindle bottom bracket? Yes. So there is a gain there even if it is only marginal. It's up to you to decide whether the benefit is noticeable to you.

Pivot developed the super boost standard. If they wanted a stiffer rear end and stiffer wheel, widening the hub is one way to do that. They had a need, and chose a path to satisfy that need. Even regular boost has the same benefits over 142 spacing.

In a world dominated by 1x12, nothing without a 10 tooth cog will be taken seriously whether you agree with that or not. SRAM set a bar with eagle that pretty much everyone is accepting as the new standard. If SRAM won't license their XD driver to Shimano, what do you expect Shimano to do? You cannot fit a 10 tooth cog on a hyperglide freehub.

New standards also don't push out old ones like everyone imagines they do. I can still buy 142 hubs for my 142 frames (or 135 for that matter). I can buy any type of threaded bottom bracket I want. GXP stuff is still out there. Shimano still sells 7 speed cassettes. The list goes on. It really only matters if you're buying a new frame and in that case, you should go into it with some sort of idea what current standards are. It only takes 5 minutes to realize that buying a frame with boost spacing right now is probably a safer bet than 142. And when it comes to geometry changes, your old frame is still the same old frame that you thought was great when you bought it.

Do these changes hurt resale? Yes. And that definitely sucks. But if we rejected every new standard that came along think about where we'd be.

What I think is really interesting is that Trek has appeared to be adopting the Chris King developed T47 bottom bracket standard and people are generally enthusiastic about it because it's a threaded bottom bracket rather than pressfit. It's still a new standard so I view it as a bit of a cop-out to embrace it just because it's threaded like everyone's beloved BSA bottom brackets (you'll still need a new tool for the cups).

Lastly, how long have you guys been doing R&D for SRAM or any of these other companies?

Anyway, believe what you want and vote with your wallet. If people really don't like new standards as much as they say, then they'd stop buying the stuff. As fat bikers and plus bikers can attest, the industry won't continue to push what doesn't sell.
 

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Well, I agree that most companies design things to improve on their previous products. However, the improvements often times, including SRAM Dub, are so incremental that it is pretty clear they are after a few bucks by forcing upgrades. Hey, I get it. Companies need to make money. Just don't pretend that they are doing things in the best interest of the buying public.
 

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The great thing about DT350 hubs is that the cassette body is super easy to change. Get an HG now. You can swap out for XD or micro-spline in the future if you decide to run gears.

I will say, though, that I chewed up the aluminum DT free hub pretty quickly when I was switching between SS and gears, so I swapped to the steel freehub.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Heartland, I did go with the HG. I used to run DT240 on my single speeds in the past but I just couldn't swing the dough this time. Builds are getting expensive.
Frame, wheels, suspension fork and you're already close to $1500.
 

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Well, I agree that most companies design things to improve on their previous products. However, the improvements often times, including SRAM Dub, are so incremental that it is pretty clear they are after a few bucks by forcing upgrades. Hey, I get it. Companies need to make money. Just don't pretend that they are doing things in the best interest of the buying public.
Except that by introducing Dub, SRAM rolled two spindle sizes into one standard. Dub is replacing 24mm and 30mm spindles. To me that is more than an incremental improvement. I like GXP better, but if I can get a stiffer/lighter spindle in Dub and have better bearing life than with a 30mm spindle, I don't see the problem.

We are talking about marginal gains though. And that is why I say it's a matter of perspective. It's up to you to decide whether that gain is worth your money. But marginal gains are different than change for the sake of change.
 

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Except that by introducing Dub, SRAM rolled two spindle sizes into one standard. Dub is replacing 24mm and 30mm spindles. To me that is more than an incremental improvement. I like GXP better, but if I can get a stiffer/lighter spindle in Dub and have better bearing life than with a 30mm spindle, I don't see the problem.

We are talking about marginal gains though. And that is why I say it's a matter of perspective. It's up to you to decide whether that gain is worth your money. But marginal gains are different than change for the sake of change.
But Dub isnt lighter than 24mm. This is from a weight weenie who wanted to use their cranks. Sure, the highest end crank is lighter, but the more affordable options are not such as the stylo. The dub stlyo is acutally 70 grams more than the 24mm gxp. My 9 year old xt was lighter with its outdated 24mm spindle and god forbid chainring bolts. Maybe the bearing life is improved or stiffness, but im not flexing a 24mm spindle on a road or mtb. Bearing life was amazing before press fit. Eh, back to my hole.

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