Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can’t decide which to go with. The 350s are simple with no tool disassembly for maintenance, and they’re a tick cheaper. However, they don’t have great engagement numbers unless you go with the upgraded ratchets with more teeth, which adds to the cost. I’ve also read they are pretty quiet, and they’re made overseas. On the other hand, the 101’s come from my home state, have good engagement, and make some noise. They don’t seem to be as easy to disassemble for maintenance though, and they’re a brand new hub.

I want some noise from my hub, as I encounter hikers and equestrians on my local trail almost every ride. It’s good to be heard so those folks know I’m coming from a ways back and they don’t get surprised by me. Which hub would you all go with?
 

·
since 4/10/2009
Joined
·
34,930 Posts
Can't decide which to go with. The 350s are simple with no tool disassembly for maintenance, and they're a tick cheaper. However, they don't have great engagement numbers unless you go with the upgraded ratchets with more teeth, which adds to the cost. I've also read they are pretty quiet, and they're made overseas. On the other hand, the 101's come from my home state, have good engagement, and make some noise. They don't seem to be as easy to disassemble for maintenance though, and they're a brand new hub.

I want some noise from my hub, as I encounter hikers and equestrians on my local trail almost every ride. It's good to be heard so those folks know I'm coming from a ways back and they don't get surprised by me. Which hub would you all go with?
I thought hard about getting the 101 hubs for my recent wheel build. They seem somewhat similar to Torch, with a few of the improvements from the Hydra (namely, the pawl springs) and a more attractive price. But in the end, the reported improvements in durability due to the processional engagement of the Hydra hubs won me out.

It's kinda tough for me to choose between the two. I like a hub with respectable engagement, so that'd put me onto the I9 preferentially. I kinda feel like 40 points of engagement (like on my Hope Pro II EVO Fatsno hubs) is about a minimum for me. Less than that, and I really feel limited on slow, technical stuff. But with that said, the simplicity of the star ratchet is a nice benefit. It's easy to replace if needed. If you're a hub destroyer, DT would be the one for me. If I went DT, I'd be getting the upgraded ratchets no question to balance out engagement and simplicity.

I'll be curious how Hydra holds up under hub destroyers. I'm certainly not one. If it works as advertised, though, then it might be a great option for those folks, too.

Either is fine, just add a small bell from Cateye to alert others to your presence.
I find the more constant noise from coasting hubs is a better signal than a ding-ding bell on a mtb used on multi-use singletrack in the woods. The hubs provide a signal before anyone ever sees you, whereas unless you're hitting the ding-ding bell constantly (who DOES that?), you aren't going to activate it until you see someone. If you go quiet hubs, I think the Timber bell is a MUCH better choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No bell going on my bike. I’ve never had a problem on the trails without one. The noise my sunringle src hub makes usually lets folks know I’m coming. If I get closer and it seems like folks don’t hear me I just vocalize that I’m coming. It seems like hub noise gets the horses attention though, and the horses never seem to be caught off guard by me.

I’d really like to see the 350 hubs come with ratchets with more teeth. That’s really the only thing keeping me from getting them. Getting the upgraded ratchets to put them on equal engagement with the 101 hubs make them more expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,776 Posts
Can't decide which to go with. The 350s are simple with no tool disassembly for maintenance, and they're a tick cheaper. However, they don't have great engagement numbers unless you go with the upgraded ratchets with more teeth, which adds to the cost. I've also read they are pretty quiet, and they're made overseas. On the other hand, the 101's come from my home state, have good engagement, and make some noise. They don't seem to be as easy to disassemble for maintenance though, and they're a brand new hub.

I want some noise from my hub, as I encounter hikers and equestrians on my local trail almost every ride. It's good to be heard so those folks know I'm coming from a ways back and they don't get surprised by me. Which hub would you all go with?
I love the 350's but it sounds like the I9's are for you. More engagement and probably louder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,062 Posts
Sometimes it seems like people make it out like hubs break all over the place, left and right and are difficult to even maintain, and DT's are the only way out of this endless unreliability.

I've broken one hub ever, and it was the pos koozers. Everything else has held up wonderfully. Nearly everything on the market now is either toolless, or you just use a couple hex keys to pull apart.

Most peoples experience with most hubs in terms of reliability will be the same. The few outliers know who they are and they should be on DT's or kings, but those people are less common than people without issues.

I wouldnt pick a DT hub unless you have at least one busted hub under your belt or you're into the sort of riding that has you days and miles out from anywhere (bikepacking, etc). Otherwise, you're giving up engagement for nothing, really.

DT's do offer the 54t ratchet, but its another $100, and now that legendary reliability is reduced to hit or miss and questionable... and really, 54t isnt all that much engagement. The budget i9's have nearly double that right out of the box, and at that point the nod for reliability tips towards i9.
 

·
mbtr member
Joined
·
6,503 Posts
Sometimes it seems like people make it out like hubs break all over the place, left and right and are difficult to even maintain, and DT's are the only way out of this endless unreliability.

I've broken one hub ever, and it was the pos koozers. Everything else has held up wonderfully. Nearly everything on the market now is either toolless, or you just use a couple hex keys to pull apart.

Most peoples experience with most hubs in terms of reliability will be the same. The few outliers know who they are and they should be on DT's or kings, but those people are less common than people without issues.

I wouldnt pick a DT hub unless you have at least one busted hub under your belt or you're into the sort of riding that has you days and miles out from anywhere (bikepacking, etc). Otherwise, you're giving up engagement for nothing, really.

DT's do offer the 54t ratchet, but its another $100, and now that legendary reliability is reduced to hit or miss and questionable... and really, 54t isnt all that much engagement. The budget i9's have nearly double that right out of the box, and at that point the nod for reliability tips towards i9.
If you do break hubs... then DTs ARE the only way out of this endless unreliability (or at least the cheapest way). But yah, you're right on all points.

350+36t star ratchet would be my choice. Noisy enough, quick-enough engagement, legendary durability, and easy servicing. Full disclosure- I'm a DT fanboy and think i9s sound obnoxious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
At this point I’m leaning towards the I9 101’s due to better engagement. What is it about the 350’s that makes them known to be so durable? Is it the ratchet drive design, and the fact that they come with ratchet rings with a smaller number of large teeth? If so, does durability go down by upgrading to the rings with more, smaller teeth? I’ve never ruined a hub, by the way. I’ve only owned two bikes, both of which came with cheaper hubs and drivers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,016 Posts
I like 2 ratchets and 2 springs.
When I notice the noise it's time to clean and grease. I don't need noise for my rides.
Other hubs have many more small springs and pawls.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,400 Posts
I find the more constant noise from coasting hubs is a better signal than a ding-ding bell on a mtb used on multi-use singletrack in the woods. The hubs provide a signal before anyone ever sees you, whereas unless you're hitting the ding-ding bell constantly (who DOES that?), you aren't going to activate it until you see someone. If you go quiet hubs, I think the Timber bell is a MUCH better choice.
Lucky you then, most people ignored my hope pro 4 on my previous bike.. I guess it also has to do with where you're from/located?

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I am near 350lbs and the only issue I've had with hubs are with aluminum freehub bodies. One hard ride and I have gouges in the freehub splines. After a few rides I have to use a rubber mallet to separate the aluminum freehub from the cassette. I go steel freehubs now and I have had no issues with hub/freehub reliability. My experience with different hubs is fairly limited though. I have yet to try Onyx, i9's and other popular hubs. The only reason I have so many hubs now is that I was told I would destroy lesser hubs with my weight. I have not found this to be true yet.

I am currently running these rear hubs:
-DT 350 Hybrid 24t
-DT 350 54t,
-Hope Pro 4
-Stock Bontrager for my road set.

I prefer 24t over 54t for my 350's as they are much quieter and provide satisfactory engagement.

The Hope 4 Pros are my least favorite so far. So damn loud and they seem to get dirty internally quicker than the DT's or the Bonts. It isn't hard to open them up and clean out the grease and replace, but I rather not if I can avoid it. The green seal they use does not keep out desert dirt and dust very well.

Photo of the Hope4 Pro aluminum freehub body damage was after 1 ride. The steel hybrid freehub body next to the aluminum has had 3 rides and it has no gouges. Keep in mind that this is all with NX eagle 12s cassettes and the majority of cogs are loose and not 1 piece.

Product Maroon Still life photography Lens Camera lens
 

·
Rocks belong
Joined
·
5,371 Posts
I have DT350's with the 54POE ratchets on one bike and I9 Torch's on the other.

I honestly cannot tell that much difference between 54POE and 120POE.

I9's are a touch louder, but nothing insane. You hear it, but it's not obnoxious.
 

·
mbtr member
Joined
·
6,503 Posts
I am near 350lbs...
I've been 300lbs, and during that period i didn't break hubs (aside from shimano). I lacked the skills to hop on the gas in the middle of a rock garden, or land fairly sideways off a jump, and i was more conservative- 300lbs of inertia is a lot!

Hub breakage is influenced by 4 factors- weight, power, competence, and hack-ness. You can max out one of those and be totally fine on inferior hubs. A big, skilled enthusiast who isn't afraid to **** up is going to stress hubs waaay more than 98% of riders. Same goes for frames.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'm thinking I'm going to go with the I9 hubs with RF Arc35 rims. If, for some strange reason, I ever ruin the I9 101 hubs, I'll just switch to using the DT350's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,634 Posts
I've got three sets of wheels all with 350 rear hubs. What's convenient about them is how easy I can swap cassettes onto different bikes. The hub body just slides right off along with the endcap. I've been swapping with my 120 and 140mm bikes since I'm still waiting on the delivery of a cassette for the 140mm bike.

Cleaning the ratchets are super easy too. 10min job. I'll know it's time when they start to get louder.
 
1 - 20 of 54 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top