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viva la v-brakes!
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NOBL Wheels has all the hubs with photos:
 

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viva la v-brakes!
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As a hub SET, each with j-bend spoke flange, 6-bolt disc mount and Shimano MicroDrive freehub, for comparison's sake:

I9 = 476g
240 EXP = 379g

so its actually 97g

Which is pretty significant. With that said, I know I get caught up in these seemingly hard numbers and put a lot of stock into them, when other factors, that are harder to put a number on, are just as important, if not more so.

EDIT: I will say that the sound a hub makes is at the very bottom of my list of things to think about when deciding which to buy. I've owned the notoriously loud Chris King hub for years, and honestly most of the time the noise it makes just fades into the background, you don't notice. And after about 20 years, they start to quiet down a bit.
 
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Here’s the difference of the two hub sets. Rims and spokes(berd) are the same. The I9’s have tape and valves, which is why they are a little heavier than the 90 g’s. Btw, this shows that you can get a set of wheels in the 1300’s with I9’s. It’s not cheap.... But these wheels are pretty great. If I remember correctly these rims are 30mm Inner. But I'd have to measure to make sure. Btw, it should also be pointed out that the new 240's are a decent amount lighter than the old ones shown here.
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I know nothing of the I9s, but I will say that my 240s are now at 11 years and 30,000km, a lot of it in winter slush.

With just some grease every year or two.

No other wheelset I've had has lasted that long.... they are approaching mechanical immortality.

(knock on wood)
 

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I like DTs for my XC rigs and i9s for the Enduro. Both have been rock solid for years.


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I think you're misunderstanding that system. Yes, a single pawl engages first but before it receives too much torque, a second, third, and forth pawl engage so that no one pawl ever receives too much load. It's actually an extremely strong design.

There's lots of them out there at this point, if it was problematic it would be all over the internet.

I do believe I understand the system. I’m not saying it’s junk or not reliable but point out that the DT system would likely be considered superior from a mechanical engineering point of view.

As far as engagement goes, does 1 pawl have much more stress than the others or does the system flex easily and the other pawls engage rather quickly? Option 1 will likely lead to premature wear or damage. Option 2 means your not really getting 690 points of engagement. So at .52 degrees engagement per pawl how many pawls do you need engaged to support your max torque? 2,3,4? Each additional pawl means you effectively lost another half degree of engagement. If it’s 4 then the marketing doesn’t look nearly as good vs DT and your still working with a hub with uneven loads however minor that may be. Both systems may be overkill in strength for mtbing but I would not consider them equal.
 

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psycho cyclo addict
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I know nothing of the I9s, but I will say that my 240s are now at 11 years and 30,000km, a lot of it in winter slush.

With just some grease every year or two.

No other wheelset I've had has lasted that long.... they are approaching mechanical immortality.

(knock on wood)
Same here... I have multiple sets of ~2008-ish DT 240s and Chris King hubs that have been trouble free with minor cleaning and re-greasing US ng no special tools.

I also run a few 3-pawl lower POE Stan's HD's plus others and don't notice a dramatic difference compared to climbing stuff on 36/54 DT ratchets or King's.

Some of my friends had i9's. The biggest complaints from them were about excessive rear hub noise and bearings going bad. I think the bearing issues are not so common these days. My King's are super quiet which most people don't expect.

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Wanna ride bikes?
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I do believe I understand the system. I’m not saying it’s junk or not reliable but point out that the DT system would likely be considered superior from a mechanical engineering point of view.

As far as engagement goes, does 1 pawl have much more stress than the others or does the system flex easily and the other pawls engage rather quickly? Option 1 will likely lead to premature wear or damage. Option 2 means your not really getting 690 points of engagement. So at .52 degrees engagement per pawl how many pawls do you need engaged to support your max torque? 2,3,4? Each additional pawl means you effectively lost another half degree of engagement. If it’s 4 then the marketing doesn’t look nearly as good vs DT and your still working with a hub with uneven loads however minor that may be. Both systems may be overkill in strength for mtbing but I would not consider them equal.
You don't understand.
 

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Putting weight aside, the 240s are easy to service. If the Hydras are anything like the guts of my Torches, it’s microsurgery to deal with. Both hubs have wear spots. The I9 bearings vs 240s ratchet surface.

Edit: The 240s bearings will wear too.

My lowest maintenance hubs are the Kings (angular contact bearings). But they are tricky to service, if you want to do a complete job.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Thanks for all the replies. I'm sure I can't go wrong either way and just need to decide what is more important in the end. One small potential rub with the I9's is if I go that route, i will likely get the orange colour to match the accents on my bike (which will look cool) but which makes it less likely i would be able to bring the wheels over to my next bike whenever that may be. That said I love love love this V4 Ripley and can't imaging selling it for at least 3-4 more years.
 

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Ha, love the anti-jinx at the end!
What I didn't mention is that I've somehow had the same set of rims (Stans 26er) on them the whole time. I replaced a bunch of rear spokes about five years ago but that's it.

My mechanic doesn't understand how they've lasted so long, and I kind of don't either.

For a long time I figured I could just build them into a new wheel set when the time comes, but I'm no longer sure that they'll be convertible to whatever strange new hub standards are in effect at that point.
 

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Just wondering how many would choose the DT's because of the 90g weight difference. I'm not a full on weight weenie and not racing but am trying to lighten up my V4 Ripley a bit. I'm building a wheel set and current is ~1900grams and I had it in my mind I want to get to the 1500 gram range. If I build with Hydras that i want for the bling colour and unique sound it will be 1650g and the 240's will get me more the desired weight of mid 1500grams. If i post in any other forum I'm sure ppl will just say you will never feel the 90 grams so just get the hydras but wondering what ppl say here. Thanks!
I would go DT without giving it a second thought. and not because of the weight advantage. Difference in engagement is fairly irrelevant, but if you want DT has the option of a 54 points rachet. Want bling? Get a pair of DT XMC 1200 ... or go for the less expensive XMC 1501. My 2015 XMC have thousands of miles on them and still going as strong as day one ...
 

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I would go DT without giving it a second thought. and not because of the weight advantage. Difference in engagement is fairly irrelevant, but if you want DT has the option of a 54 points rachet. Want bling? Get a pair of DT XMC 1200 ... or go for the less expensive XMC 1501. My 2015 XMC have thousands of miles on them and still going as strong as day one ...
Or because DT is simply a better, more durable hub.


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Or because DT is simply a better, more durable hub.


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Yes, that is what I meant (a bit cryptically) when I said to go for DT "not because of the weight advantage"! (although it is nice bonus.)

They'll outlive my HD3 and my main problem is that they are non-boost: what will I do with them!!!!!
 

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Here’s the difference of the two hub sets. Rims and spokes(berd) are the same. The I9’s have tape and valves, which is why they are a little heavier than the 90 g’s. Btw, this shows that you can get a set of wheels in the 1300’s with I9’s. It’s not cheap.... But these wheels are pretty great. If I remember correctly these rims are 30mm Inner. But I'd have to measure to make sure. Btw, it should also be pointed out that the new 240's are a decent amount lighter than the old ones shown here. View attachment 1912704 View attachment 1912705 View attachment 1912706
Do you have any idea what rim this is? 1265g with a 30mm id rim seems crazy light.
 
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