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Former Bike Wrench
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Wax cannot flow in it's solid state, so once it gets scraped off it no longer provides lubricating properties. That is why dry lubes need to be re-applied constantly. I tried the dry lube thing when I was living down in Las Vegas, none would last a 20 mile ride without needing re-application in completely dry conditions.
 

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I'm still having a hard time using the stuff. I had the same problems, wears off to fast, But I hear Boeshield works well if you apply it eight hours ahead of time.

Seriously!
 

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One drop of Boeshield on each link, give it a good wipe-down right away, let dry and then soak it with White Lightning. Works good for keeping dust and or mud off, and provides longer lubed time. It's good to give your bike some love!
 

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Wax cannot flow in it's solid state, so once it gets scraped off it no longer provides lubricating properties. That is why dry lubes need to be re-applied constantly. I tried the dry lube thing when I was living down in Las Vegas, none would last a 20 mile ride without needing re-application in completely dry conditions.
In extremely dusty conditions, I apply after ever ride (10-15 mi). In regular dry conditions, I apply every other ride.
 

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Lets not forget that the part of a chain that requires lube is the part we cannot see or touch, and in fact, it is ideal that we can't see or touch any of the lube. If you cannot regularly get through one dry ride with a dry lube, you're not letting your lube work in to your chain enough.
 

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Former Bike Wrench
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15,976 Posts
Lets not forget that the part of a chain that requires lube is the part we cannot see or touch, and in fact, it is ideal that we can't see or touch any of the lube. If you cannot regularly get through one dry ride with a dry lube, you're not letting your lube work in to your chain enough.
Instructions always followed exactly as written on the bottle, I've lubed more chains than most people as a mechanic for 8 years so I'm beyond competent. Most dry lubes have you wastefully pour the crap all over the chain then let it soak in while the solvent carrier evaporates (nice VOC action going on there). The the now dry wax simply sheds off or the metal to metal contact shears the wax off and since dried wax cannot flow, it can't re-lubricate so it simply falls off or is pushed out of the chain. So you have to put more on...constantly. Does it keep your chain clean, yes. Does it properly lubricate the inner workings of your chain, not for very long.

If you don't mind wasting money on 4oz bottles of dry lube that you blow through because of the wasteful application method and how often it needs to be done then dry lube may work for you.:thumbsup:
 

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My apologies. I thought you were referring to a liquid "dry weather" lube, as apposed to a heavy "wet weather" lube. Literal dry lube (eg. a wax, non-liquid lube) does not work. I agree. The only exception being the factory film that comes stock on some chains (some still use more of a liquid lube from the factory).
 

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The Wiking
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As matty f, I see no reason why PTFE lube(dry-lube) shouldnt work!
However wax, paraffin etc. can hardly be described as being 'LUBE'.. allthough fluid whilest warm, it is not lube(in my book that is).

I've used a lot of dry lube on my boat, rollers, blocks, sails etc. because it isn't messy. I have not considered trying it on my chain, however levers, shifters and cables it is supreme!
 
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