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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone know of a post or website or anything that gives step by step intusctions on drawing up a frame (to scale).
I know the firsat few steps (from UBI) but for the life of me I can't remember what to do when it comes to TT length in relation to headtube angle (does this make any sense at all?)
Thanks
 

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Bike Dork
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4 years ago I did one for road bikes, but you can easily adapt it for MTBs. It's also done with simple cheap tools for non art pros. You can check out the tutorial at my website Ivy Cycles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
themanmonkey said:
4 years ago I did one for road bikes, but you can easily adapt it for MTBs. It's also done with simple cheap tools for non art pros. You can check out the tutorial at my website Ivy Cycles.
Thanks for the link, I was just able to briefly skim thru it (too many kids needing me...:madman: )
Tonite I'll have to sit down and really soak it all in.

I wish we could edit titles on here so it looks like I know how to spell...:D
 

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Drawing by hand is a complete waste of time. Draw it up on a computer using BikeCAD or any basic cad package and then print to scale at your local Kinkos. By using a parametric based program, you will be able to make small changes after looking at your results and then print again without redrawing the entire project. It's just like using a word processor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
pvd said:
Drawing by hand is a complete waste of time. Draw it up on a computer using BikeCAD or any basic cad package and then print to scale at your local Kinkos. By using a parametric based program, you will be able to make small changes after looking at your results and then print again without redrawing the entire project. It's just like using a word processor.
Boy, you have alot of confidence in my computer competency..:thumbsup:
 

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I second the computer thing, Haven't hand-drawn a frame in 10 years at least...But......

I have taught some students and the things like bikecad make it very easy to not really understand what they are designing. When you draw it full size it is very easy to see how one relationship affects another. It especially sinks in when they have to go erasing the whole DT/HT intersection point and redo it:D

So I do think there is merit in doing it by hand, at least the first few times.

Dave Bohm
Bohemian Bicycles
http://www.bohemianbicycles.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
dbohemian said:
I second the computer thing, Haven't hand-drawn a frame in 10 years at least...But......

I have taught some students and the things like bikecad make it very easy to not really understand what they are designing. When you draw it full size it is very easy to see how one relationship affects another. It especially sinks in when they have to go erasing the whole DT/HT intersection point and redo it:D

So I do think there is merit in doing it by hand, at least the first few times.

Dave Bohm
Bohemian Bicycles
http://www.bohemianbicycles.com

Yeah, unfortuately I'm one of those guys who learns by doing many many times.
 

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Just to add to the bandwagon I'm a paid up user of BikeCAD Pro myself these days and rarely do a hand drawing anymore. I think Dave's right when he mentions that doing the drawing makes you think things out in more detail. I think hand drawing your first couple frame is a good idea, but if you're going to go any further with the designing aspect learning some kind of CAD is vital.
 
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