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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I been doing some reading and it seems using one for XC racing and XCM at this moment, it’s like a 50/50 decision among most riders. I been considering purchasing one but seems some that are considered good are heavy and if repairs need (fox transfer) is also $150 for repairs....
I’m looking for something good and light 100 mm.
Anyone here had issues with a fox transfer?
What about the OneUp, Bile Yoke or KS Lev?

Thanks
 

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Out spokin'
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I have a BikeYoke Revive -- been using it since since August '18 and it's been flawless. On another bike I have a KS LEV (my second of two, purchased at the same time maybe 4 years ago for two different bikes) and the LEV doesn't spring up as lively as the Revive. But it is old. A riding buddy has a OneUp and has praised it to the degree that I bought one to install on a custom frame that's in the works, though I admit if cost had not been a consideration, I would have purchased another Revive. I hear good things about the Transfer, too.

To the more basic question of whether or not to employ a dropper, I can only say that along with acquiring the tool itself, I needed to learn to ride a new way (to me) in order to exploit the dropper's mighty powers. Before getting one, my friend Ken told me, "Get a dropper and you won't have to slow down for corners anymore." He was right to a significant degree, but I needed more than the dropper -- I needed to learn to ride a new way. Didn't take long and having done so, I can no longer imagine riding without one. I probably use my dropper more often than I shift. Descending, jumping, cornering -- everything became easier and now I go faster with more confidence. Definitely worth its weight, IMO.
=sParty
 

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I've had several droppers and have found that for xc I don't need a long dropper.

KS lev ci 65mm can be found for $260 on closeout right now. Definitely worth considering at that price
 

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EAT MORE GRIME
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I have a BikeYoke Revive -- been using it since since August '18 and it's been flawless. On another bike I have a KS LEV (my second of two, purchased at the same time maybe 4 years ago for two different bikes) and the LEV doesn't spring up as lively as the Revive. But it is old. A riding buddy has a OneUp and has praised it to the degree that I bought one to install on a custom frame that's in the works, though I admit if cost had not been a consideration, I would have purchased another Revive. I hear good things about the Transfer, too.

To the more basic question of whether or not to employ a dropper, I can only say that along with acquiring the tool itself, I needed to learn to ride a new way (to me) in order to exploit the dropper's mighty powers. Before getting one, my friend Ken told me, "Get a dropper and you won't have to slow down for corners anymore." He was right to a significant degree, but I needed more than the dropper -- I needed to learn to ride a new way. Didn't take long and having done so, I can no longer imagine riding without one. I probably use my dropper more often than I shift. Descending, jumping, cornering -- everything became easier and now I go faster with more confidence. Definitely worth its weight, IMO.
=sParty
this

I am still learning to use the dropper. I can PR swoopy sections if I focus on dropping and using the added space....but if I am just cranking along I tend to just not use it except for big steeps. gotta get to the point it is second nature. plug for bikeyoke though, it is one damn smooth, fast-rise, perfect dropper.

it's 125, I don't need a tall dropper. being a lifetime roadie even 2mm drop I can feel the biomechanical difference. dropping 125mm seems huge and of course lets me move around a ton vs fixed post. not really into hucking... 125 is fine
 

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I am 1 month into my 9point8 Fall Line R (light XC post). I wanted to buy the 75mm stroke, but at 6’1” and large bike frame, I had to get 100mm stroke to meet the minimum seat tube insertion. I’m just starting to play around with it as it’s my first dropper ever and it feels a bit odd to loose the seat beneath me. I’m sure the benefits will come with more time in the saddle. I’m headed out to Colorado and Utah for a week of riding so I’m sure I’ll have plenty of opportunities to get used to the new dropper. So far the feel and function is great.

Do I “need” a dropper for XC in Michigan? Probably not, but I’m sure it will help in decents, and coming off a AC separation last fall in a loose fast downhill section maybe this will help prevent the next crash. Also, I race MTB 100s and doing the Margi Gesick in Sept 2019 where droppers are needed. So, instead of taking it on and off the bike per race (weight penalty is negligible), I’m racing all year with it to learn a new way to ride corners and decents as other have stated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I think I read somewhere that Bike Yoke has also the Divine SL or something like that which is made for XC racing and XCM, but havent seen any info on it. Most with a BY have and recommend the Revive. Honestly I was considering the Fox transfer just cause my Blur has all Fox suspension and I can get it either the factory or the performance edition ( my Nike has the performance but will like to upgrade them to the factory later on), but it kinda throw me off all the post I been reading about it if needs servicing it’s $150 for it.... not sure how often will would happen tho...
But then I’m also interested in the BY and KS ones, which seems the other common options.
 

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I have a transfer, it crapped out right away and needed a rebuild.

I have two bikeyoke revives, these are amazing. IMO, the first post that can survive season after season. The user service is fairly simple to do. Traditional seatpost woes include slowly grinding to a halt or starting to sag, and then after rebuild, they never seem to last as long as they did initially, crapping out much sooner. The bikeyoke is different. Makes the transfer feel like it's filled with peanut butter.

In real short intense races I don't really need one, when the trail transitions too fast, even with features like a table-top or step up, it'll often take just a half a second to lower/raise the post, but during that time I could be pedaling or putting the power down sooner, so while I won't take it off, there are races where I don't use it at all. It's faster to still hit those obstacles, with the seat up, and then keep pedaling instantly when you hit the ground again. On the other hand, on longer races, it's a godsend to be able to lower and get the seat out of the way and make the most out of a descent. You end up spending some $$$ compensating on the rest of the bike if you are trying to keep weight down, but for longer races especially, I like it, or races that alternate with big climbs and descents, even if they aren't "long races".
 

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learn to ride a new way (to me) in order to exploit the dropper's mighty powers
This, this is very important.

I can't tell you how often I see XC racers not using a dropper properly. Not only is it annoying, but EVERY time it is because they are in front of me holding me up.

I am a very strong descender, I don't use a dropper on my XC, and tend to be faster with a regular post descending than most do with a dropper. But that helps compensate for my lack of power...

If you use a dropper, you need to train yourself to think of the natural seat position as being DOWN, not up. Always, always, ALWAYS put your post down if you don't need it up! Every corner, drop it. Every SLIGHT downhill, drop it. If you are not sure, drop it. Basically if you are not sitting on the seat, the seat should be down.

My training bike is a 160mm Enduro with coil suspension and the longest dropper my legs can handle. I only oppose droppers on my XC bike because my power/weight ratio is worse than my rivals, but I descend faster. If it wasn't for that, I would.
 

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If you use a dropper, you need to train yourself to think of the natural seat position as being DOWN, not up. Always, always, ALWAYS put your post down if you don't need it up! Every corner, drop it. Every SLIGHT downhill, drop it. If you are not sure, drop it. Basically if you are not sitting on the seat, the seat should be down.
I have to disagree with you here.

My experience is people who drop their post for easy features tend to ride them slower then they would with their seat up. Particularly when racing.

A dropper post expands the capabilities of your bike, if you are riding something that is well within your bikes capabilities then there is no need to expand it. The act of lowering and raising your seat is a small break in rythm that slows you down just a bit. Some times it is worth it but a lot of time it is not.
 

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Up In Smoke
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When it comes to XC racing I would only use a dropper for technical and long descents, but being able to ride fast without a dropper is an important fundamental skill.
 

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Bikeyoke makes the best droppers. If you get one, practice with it until it is as instinctive as shifting.
 

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...
A dropper post expands the capabilities of your bike, if you are riding something that is well within your bikes capabilities then there is no need to expand it. The act of lowering and raising your seat is a small break in rythm that slows you down just a bit. Some times it is worth it but a lot of time it is not.
I tend to agree. I have dropper on my 5" trail bike and what I can charge down with seat down vs up is very different. I never put one on my XC race bike however because of the weight and generally I did not need it for what I was riding. Even on the 5" bike most of the time I don't use it. It tends to work better for longer features. I have however been eyeing light dropper for my Epic. There some back country races/rides that I do where it really would come in handy to have little drop just give me more room to move. This brings margin and expands what I can ride on the XC bike.

So given the closeout I ordered KS Lev CI carbon. only 65mm of drop, but still light and in my opinion worth a try. I don't need it for local XC races, but I always felt a dropper on this bike would make it really rip. Plus I feel I need to work on my cornering to keep up in my class and taking a tiny weight hit might be worth it if I can learn to use it to corner faster. If not I don't think it is going to hurt me much.
 

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Out spokin'
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This, this is very important.

I can't tell you how often I see XC racers not using a dropper properly. Not only is it annoying, but EVERY time it is because they are in front of me holding me up.

I am a very strong descender, I don't use a dropper on my XC, and tend to be faster with a regular post descending than most do with a dropper. But that helps compensate for my lack of power...

If you use a dropper, you need to train yourself to think of the natural seat position as being DOWN, not up. Always, always, ALWAYS put your post down if you don't need it up! Every corner, drop it. Every SLIGHT downhill, drop it. If you are not sure, drop it. Basically if you are not sitting on the seat, the seat should be down.
Agree with you on this, Sidewalk. My saddle is down unless I need it up. Which means it's up a lot given the amount of climbing around here. Regardless, point taken: down has become my saddle's "standard" position. :thumbsup:
=sParty
 

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I have to disagree with you here.

My experience is people who drop their post for easy features tend to ride them slower then they would with their seat up. Particularly when racing.

A dropper post expands the capabilities of your bike, if you are riding something that is well within your bikes capabilities then there is no need to expand it. The act of lowering and raising your seat is a small break in rythm that slows you down just a bit. Some times it is worth it but a lot of time it is not.
That is probably because they haven't developed the skill. I can run the entire jump line at Snow Summit on my XC HT with rigid post, and probably get more air than 50% of the riders on enduro and DH bikes. Clearly, within the bikes capabilities. But I also prefer to ride my long travel bike at Snow Summit too, even on the days when I skip the ski lift and pedal up to the top (bike weight of 35+ pounds).

If you are going SLOWER with your seat down over any obstacle than it is from a lack of comfort with the skill, not the "break in the rhythm".
 

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I am Walt
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Blue Sky,

https://blueskycycling.com/products...R9eKo33nTxzqj1NYmjl7HZ6oKqmLSREQaAjNiEALw_wcB

There were 28 left, I just ordered one for my epic. Now there are 27. Can't beat it at this price.
Thanks...I'm mulling it over. I'd put it on my LES SS, since so many people are going to droppers on XC bikes and SS's these days. There's a thread in the SS forum on it. I would have thought it blasphemy, but more people than I realized are using them.

That said, and despite all of the alleged advantages, I'm inclined to just do what I do on a SS anyway, which is to just ride, and not worry about **** like gears or droppers or whatever. I also look at it this way: I can ride just about everything that I'm going to try and ride anyway on my SS with its rigid carbon post, so do I REALLY need a dropper? Maybe to be very, very slightly faster on certain sections, or a little bit less sketchy on others...? Is it really worth it, for me? Hence, the mulling over...
 

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Out spokin'
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Thanks...I'm mulling it over. I'd put it on my LES SS, since so many people are going to droppers on XC bikes and SS's these days. There's a thread in the SS forum on it. I would have thought it blasphemy, but more people than I realized are using them.

That said, and despite all of the alleged advantages, I'm inclined to just do what I do on a SS anyway, which is to just ride, and not worry about **** like gears or droppers or whatever. I also look at it this way: I can ride just about everything that I'm going to try and ride anyway on my SS with its rigid carbon post, so do I REALLY need a dropper? Maybe to be very, very slightly faster on certain sections, or a little bit less sketchy on others...? Is it really worth it, for me? Hence, the mulling over...
We each have to make our own way on this and we all ride differently, so obviously the decision is an individual one. That said, I'll offer up my perspective, which can easily be tossed out the window as it probably should.

When I'm descending it's all about flow, even if it's through chunk, over jumps, whatever. I'm not talking about flow trails, I'm talking about *me* flowing with the bike. So for my preference, I want the same position regardless what I'm riding -- FS, SS, hardtail. Because of my perhaps unique attitude on this, I have a dropper post on every off-road bike I own. (Okay, not my off-road touring bike. But maybe later...)

Hell, if I was a roadie, I'd want a dropper post on my road bike, too. Not kidding. I'm certain I could corner faster, plus I just don't ever want that saddle in my way again. I no longer use the saddle as a tiller / steer with my thighs.

YMMV.
=sParty
 

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I am Walt
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We each have to make our own way on this and we all ride differently, so obviously the decision is an individual one. That said, I'll offer up my perspective, which can easily be tossed out the window as it probably should.

When I'm descending it's all about flow, even if it's through chunk, over jumps, whatever. I'm not talking about flow trails, I'm talking about *me* flowing with the bike. So for my preference, I want the same position regardless what I'm riding -- FS, SS, hardtail. Because of my perhaps unique attitude on this, I have a dropper post on every off-road bike I own. (Okay, not my off-road touring bike. But maybe later...)

Hell, if I was a roadie, I'd want a dropper post on my road bike, too. Not kidding. I'm certain I could corner faster, plus I just don't ever want that saddle in my way again. I no longer use the saddle as a tiller / steer with my thighs.

YMMV.
=sParty
Good stuff...thanks! And that last line is the crux of it!
 
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