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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello, I just thought that I would share my experience with a Giant dropper post being stuck in a Giant frame. I bought the frame second handed already knowing that the post was stuck. My thinking was "a stuck post, how hard could it be to get that out", boy would I regret that line of thinking.
(A bit long, my solution found in last two paragraphs)

It all started out so simple. I had a bike stand, WD40, a good pair of grip pliers (hint, don't use them unless you DO NOT intend on using the post again:nono:), an old inner tube (was supposed to help protect post from the dreaded grippies), a rubber mallet, and a lot of time and determination...so I thought:madman:.

I started by removing the seat clamp then tapping a very small screwdriver in between the post and the frame to get the WD40 some room to work. Let that sit for a few minutes then flipped the bike over and spayed the WD in through the bottom bracket. let sit. Flipped bike back around and gave the top of the post (seat removed) a few whacks with the mallet. I got this, no problem!

Wrapped the post with the inner tube, clamped on my trusty grippies:skep: and... two and half hours later, all that I had accomplished was to relieve myself of a lot more WD40, work up a sweat from hitting and "trying" to twist the damned thing, scrape up the dropper post, and totally neglect my children.

Did I mention the swearing??? Oh, there was lots and lots of swearing!

Decided that this thing is bigger than me, so I headed over to the local bike shop (LBS). After I explained my situation, the first thing that I got from the guy was a chuckle and a pitiful shake of the head. Some of the things that he suggested seemed like it would damage the frame but he did turn me on to something called PB Blaster. Off to Autozone for a can of PBB.

Spray,flip, spray,sit. Research. Whack, twist (with an old seat clamped in), spray, whack, twist, spray. More research. lemon juice, cola, whack, twist,spray.

(I know, research and LBS should have been first. Mind your own business, I'm doing this my way damn it!)

Day 4 and still no movement from this thing:


I didn't want to put the post in a vice and twist the frame, that just seemed like it would end in a bad outcome. The heat thing didn't seem right to me either.

I didn't have access to dry ice. Also, I didn't need anything else taking up space inside of the seat tube. But I did have a bag of ice in the deep freezer, what the heck!

I used isopropyl alcohol to clear all of the other stuff that I had been sending down the seat tube over the past few days. I wrapped a bag of ice around the frame seat tube then secured that in a large towel to keep insulated, let sit for 30mins. just before I unwrapped the towel I spayed the seat tube with some compressed air (the stuff that you clean off your keyboard with) just turn the can upside down and sprayed the already cold area... Super Freeze!!!

Gave the attached seat a couple of whack, and to my surprise, it moved a couple millimeters :eekster:. Gave it a few hits in the other direction, then back again. Each time the seat would turn just a little more. I then gave it a few upward whacks... yup, it moved. I was then able to twist it back & forth by hand and pull it up...Awesome!!!

I know that this is a bit long winded, but for those who have gone through it, you understand. And for the who will go through it, you will understand.

Now I have to go and reconnect with my children.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No, I forgot to mention the that the frame was carbon, I'll have to change the title. It was a bad reaction between the aluminum seat post and the carbon frame, they just seized together. I'm thinking that either Giant or the previous owner didn't use enough carbon paste on the post.
 

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You got lucky----I went thru this with my Pivot some time ago---in the end I sent the frame back to them and somehow they removed the post and sent it back----I tried for weeks using every suggestion on these forums

Turned out there was a bad batch of Lev posts where the anodizing was defective and more than a few got stuck in carbon frames.
Needless to say I loosen the clamp every few months to make sure it does not happen again----and never a Lev product for me again.
 

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No, I forgot to mention the that the frame was carbon, I'll have to change the title. It was a bad reaction between the aluminum seat post and the carbon frame, they just seized together. I'm thinking that either Giant or the previous owner didn't use enough carbon paste on the post.
I am not sure if carbon paste has dielectric properties or not. Perhaps little abrasive granules would provide enough stand off to reduce the galvanic current.
 

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I do not think paste should be used----for carbon to carbon fine if needed----but not carbon to aluminum-----been debate on this for sure----there was no such recommendation from KS or Oneup on there dropper posts----an in my case was not used on my Pivot
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I do not think paste should be used----for carbon to carbon fine if needed----but not carbon to aluminum-----been debate on this for sure----there was no such recommendation from KS or Oneup on there dropper posts----an in my case was not used on my Pivot
There does seem to be a lot of differing opinions on topic. For the new post I put a base layer of grease then a coating of fiber grip around the clamping area. I also plan on doing a monthly check with the new seat post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
there was a dude who had same issue with a niner that he bought from Jenson. Think his was carbon frame as well. the frame got nuked trying to remove the dropper. https://forums.mtbr.com/riding-passion/need-opinion-about-stuck-seatpost-1058435.html congrats on removing without damaging either one of them.
Yeah, I was pretty lucky, the frame is fine and the dropper post still works. The post has a few scuffs & scrapes from trying to use the grip pliers on it, but a little sanding and paint took care of that. It was operating a bit slow when I first got it and got worse after it and the frame was doused with all of the different fluids. But after I took it apart cleaned and lubed everything the dropper worked just fine
 

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I just wanted to add my own experience in case it helps anyone:

I just bought a second-hand Cannondale Scalpel in great condition.
Having taken it for a few rides I decided to lower the Cannondale Downlow dropper into the frame by an inch.
It turned out the dropper was stuck in the carbon frame. It looked like the dropper and frame were one continuous piece. Big name high-street bike shop had serviced the bike only 11 months ago so I was surprised how bad it was. I gave them a call and explained the situation but they were super-unhelpful. I think the previous owner had stored the bike in a private underground carpark so it's possible that moisture had caused galvanic corrosion between the carbon and aluminium. LBS reckoned the Big name high-street bike shop had installed the post with grease rather than carbon fibre grip paste.

Tuesday: Tried to introduce WD-40 down the seat tube. Turned bike upside down and squirted WD-40 through the bottle cage bolt hole. Broke the dropper while trying to twist the seat too hard :(
Wednesday: Attached a spare 31.8mm stem onto the 31.6mm seat post so that I could get some leverage using a spare handlebar. Very conscious of the possibility of breaking the frame, I didn't apply more force than I would when twisting a seat to remove a seat post. Turned bike upside down and removed the rear shock and squirted WD-40 through the open section of the frame. A while later WD-40 started seeping out of the seat tube so things were looking up, but still no movement.
Thursday: Seat post twisted out on my first attempt! Flushed out as much of the WD-40 as I could with bike cleaner followed by water

I think I can replace the slot keys inside the dropper so all in all this was a great result compared to where I was on Tuesday!

Morals of the story:
1. Install dropper posts into carbon frames using carbon fibre grip paste
2. Check your dropper post isn't stuck in the frame on a regular basis
3. Don't apply serious twisting forces to a dropper post. They are designed to fail under twisting forces
4. Be patient if you're in a similar situation
 
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