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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, finally got my custom Megatower build finished and went for my maiden voyage last weekend. And one thing I noticed right away that I had some issues with, is the dropper post. So this is my first FS bike and my first bike with a dropper post. I've never had either. So I'm obviously getting used to that, but it was very quick to learn, and I caught on how to use it almost instantly. I LOVE the idea of a dropper post and it worked as well or better than I thought it would. Makes sketchy steep sections and DH sections SO much safer feeling with the post out of the way. And it's a great dropper post... the OneUp V2 210mm post. It works really well and fast. No issues with that part.

But... I thought being such a tall guy at 6'8" would warrant me needing the tallest dropper post I could get, so I got the 210mm. But then when I'm out there riding, and come to a steep section where I need to drop the post, and I drop the post, it goes SO FAR down, that I then no longer can use the saddle for support, as it's SO low. It drops so far, that I can get off the back of the bike with INCHES or more to spare! So it basically is making me feel like there is no support for my legs from the Saddle, when it's dropped and standing on the pedals.

I "think" I would want it at least 2"-5" less drop, so that my inner legs can grab and feel the saddle for support when going downhill or steep sections. I think even with the saddle dropped like 2-5" from where it's at when it's all the way up, that I could still easily get off the back of the bike. But I don't know, as I've never had a dropper and don't want to rush into selling this and getting another one.

So I'm just wondering if this is a normal feeling? Wanting the saddle to NOT be so low? Or is it something I just have to get used too? Or should I sell my 210mm dropper for something more in the 130-150mm range? I just don't know, as this is my first FS bike and dropper post, and I'm just getting used to all of it. But I do know for sure, I didn't like HOW FAR the post dropped. It drops WAY too far. And I looked on OneUps site, and I can only put those little pins in, to take it from 210mm down to 190mm. That's only 3/4 of an inch. Nothing basically.

It also makes me wonder, WHO needs a post to drop this far, haha? I'm CRAZY tall at 6'8" and feel like having it drop this far is almost TWICE as low as I need. I can easily get way off the back of the bike and low with inches to spare with this 210mm. So why would anyone need this much?

Any ideas or thoughts on this are appreciated. Thanks
 

· high pivot witchcraft
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You will learn very quickly to ride without any need to use the saddle for support. Use the longest dropper you can without it topping out too high. Sink it fully in your seat tube, if possible. No need for support from your saddle. You want it straight the eff out of the picture when that dropper goes down. Or at least I do…

Not a bad idea to deflate your air sprung shock or detach your coil, and fully compress your linkage to make sure your saddle clears the rear tire. I’m sure it does, but it takes no time to check.
 

· Evolutionsverlierer
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What is said before but you can also change the travel not by a lot though.
You could also stop your saddle from going all the way up with your inner thighs if you like have the saddle for support midways.
 

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I've never heard of anyone having the problem of having a saddle that's too far out of the way with a dropper.....that's the entire point of the dropper post? You also don't have to go full drop every time, just control the height of the drop with your weight.
 

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As others have said there's a learning curve to moving away from grasping the saddle between your thighs. Focus on doing just that, build up the muscles required, and guaranteed the same feeling you get of having it out of the way on the downhills you'll appreciate everywhere else. Focus on staying centered in your bike and dropping your heels.

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You can and should get used to it. In the interim, why not just drop it to wherever you feel comfortable? Release the lever a couple inches above full drop; it'll stay there.
This…..don't drop it all the way, or get a dropper with less travel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You can and should get used to it. In the interim, why not just drop it to wherever you feel comfortable? Release the lever a couple inches above full drop; it'll stay there.
I've never heard of anyone having the problem of having a saddle that's too far out of the way with a dropper.....that's the entire point of the dropper post? You also don't have to go full drop every time, just control the height of the drop with your weight.
Hmmmm, interesting responses, haha.

So first of all, I can't drop the post to a specific height WHILE riding and changing gears and worrying about the trail ahead of me. I'm not a Circus juggler, haha. It's either going all the way down, or not.

And second, can someone explain WHY you need the saddle to go SO low? Like I mentioned, I'm almost positive if the saddle ONLY dropped 3-6", that would be PLENTY of room for me to get off the back of the bike without the saddle hitting my butt or getting in the way. So why the need for SO much drop?

And finally, why should I get used to and NOT use the saddle for support between my legs? I see pro and amateur riders do it all the time when riding. If you're riding through steep descents, fast sections, bumps, jumps, etc, when you're up on your pedals, wouldn't you WANT more stability? I'm not following
 

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Pro's outside of xc run their seat high and pinch it between their thighs on a bike like the high tower?? Not bloody likely.

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And second, can someone explain WHY you need the saddle to go SO low? Like I mentioned, I'm almost positive if the saddle ONLY dropped 3-6", that would be PLENTY of room for me to get off the back of the bike without the saddle hitting my butt or getting in the way. So why the need for SO much drop?

And finally, why should I get used to and NOT use the saddle for support between my legs? I see pro and amateur riders do it all the time when riding. If you're riding through steep descents, fast sections, bumps, jumps, etc, when you're up on your pedals, wouldn't you WANT more stability? I'm not following
The saddle out of the way lets you lean the bike as far as you need in a corner (main reason) and doesn't hit you in the chest if you're tucking the bike under you on a jump (maybe squashing the jump).

Clamping the saddle actually gives you less support (even if it doesn't seem that way now). You're limiting your range of motion. The bike needs to be able to move under you to absorb bumps and maintain traction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The saddle out of the way lets you lean the bike as far as you need in a corner (main reason) and doesn't hit you in the chest if you're tucking the bike under you on a jump (maybe squashing the jump).

Clamping the saddle actually gives you less support (even if it doesn't seem that way now). You're limiting your range of motion. The bike needs to be able to move under you to absorb bumps and maintain traction.
Hmmm, ok. I guess I'll just have to get used to it, and figure out how to use the bike without the saddle support. Must be something I just don't understand or see right now, but in time, will? Thanks for explaining Jeremy!
 

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Hmmmm, interesting responses, haha.

So first of all, I can't drop the post to a specific height WHILE riding and changing gears and worrying about the trail ahead of me. I'm not a Circus juggler, haha. It's either going all the way down, or not.

And second, can someone explain WHY you need the saddle to go SO low? Like I mentioned, I'm almost positive if the saddle ONLY dropped 3-6", that would be PLENTY of room for me to get off the back of the bike without the saddle hitting my butt or getting in the way. So why the need for SO much drop?

And finally, why should I get used to and NOT use the saddle for support between my legs? I see pro and amateur riders do it all the time when riding. If you're riding through steep descents, fast sections, bumps, jumps, etc, when you're up on your pedals, wouldn't you WANT more stability? I'm not following
I just got my first bike with a dropper in May. Due to availability the only post I could get for my build was a 175, but my M Hightower specs a max of 150mm. I threw the dice and I'm glad I did. The post just barely does insert enough into the frame to set the right saddle height. I drop my post 2-3" all the time in rolling terrain to have it there if I need it but out of the way enough to make a difference. At the bike park it gets slammed all the way down because I don't want it anywhere near me on the drops or jump lines. I figure you are disconcerted by the formerly ever present saddle being gone. Learn to feel the bike touching it only with your hands and feet.
 

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Hmmm, ok. I guess I'll just have to get used to it, and figure out how to use the bike without the saddle support. Must be something I just don't understand or see right now, but in time, will? Thanks for explaining Jeremy!
Here's the greatest downhill racer of all time on a Megatower. Notice how much he moves the bike around independent of his body position/lean angle.

 

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Hmmmm, interesting responses, haha.

So first of all, I can't drop the post to a specific height WHILE riding and changing gears and worrying about the trail ahead of me. I'm not a Circus juggler, haha. It's either going all the way down, or not.

And second, can someone explain WHY you need the saddle to go SO low? Like I mentioned, I'm almost positive if the saddle ONLY dropped 3-6", that would be PLENTY of room for me to get off the back of the bike without the saddle hitting my butt or getting in the way. So why the need for SO much drop?

And finally, why should I get used to and NOT use the saddle for support between my legs? I see pro and amateur riders do it all the time when riding. If you're riding through steep descents, fast sections, bumps, jumps, etc, when you're up on your pedals, wouldn't you WANT more stability? I'm not following
You get it out of the way for steep descents. Look at a DH bike. The seat is fixed in a super low location because 99.9% of the time it's not needed.
 

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Yes to the above.
1. You will learn to discard the habit of using the saddle for side to side support.
2. You also will get used to controlling the degree to which you drop it. On flat pedals, there are rough climbing sections where I drop it an inch or so, just to keep my feet planted better.
3. You "can't be too rich, too skinny" or drop the saddle too much.
 

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Hmmmm, interesting responses, haha.

So first of all, I can't drop the post to a specific height WHILE riding and changing gears and worrying about the trail ahead of me. I'm not a Circus juggler, haha. It's either going all the way down, or not.

And second, can someone explain WHY you need the saddle to go SO low? Like I mentioned, I'm almost positive if the saddle ONLY dropped 3-6", that would be PLENTY of room for me to get off the back of the bike without the saddle hitting my butt or getting in the way. So why the need for SO much drop?

And finally, why should I get used to and NOT use the saddle for support between my legs? I see pro and amateur riders do it all the time when riding. If you're riding through steep descents, fast sections, bumps, jumps, etc, when you're up on your pedals, wouldn't you WANT more stability? I'm not following
Because you need to lean the bike in corners, so your butt is way on the outside. With the sadle in the way, you can't do this.

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Hmmmm, interesting responses, haha.

So first of all, I can't drop the post to a specific height WHILE riding and changing gears and worrying about the trail ahead of me. I'm not a Circus juggler, haha. It's either going all the way down, or not.
Not sure I understand this…it takes less time and effort to drop half way than all the way. Maybe practice lowering to various levels while not on trails…maybe an empty parking lot. Press the dropper lever in, and instead of letting gravity take you all the way to the lowest position, use your leg muscles to stop yourself maybe halfway down, then release the lever.
 

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But... I thought being such a tall guy at 6'8" would warrant me needing the tallest dropper post I could get, so I got the 210mm.
If you read threads in the xc racing sub-forum, taller riders (even those much shorter than you) are the ones that are least likely to need or want dropper posts in xc racing. Taller riders already have more clearance from the saddle than shorter people when they stand on their pedals. Comfortable saddle height for sitting is generally a certain percentage of leg length (cycling inseam). Someone with 75cm inseam might have a saddle height of 64cm, giving 11 cm clearance with the saddle up or a fixed post, while someone with a 100cm inseam might proportionally have a saddle height of 85cm, giving 15cm clearance with the saddle up or a fixed post. That's a 4cm difference in clearance just because someone is taller.
 

· Professional Crastinator
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Since you're a tall dude, you have a very large range of motion compared to a smaller person - it literally feels weird to bend that far while riding a bicycle. You also have a huge range to adjust your center of gravity. Smaller people never bend that far - dropper or not.

At only 6'-3" I've been able to ride tons of crazy stuff on a rigid that some smaller people avoid on FS simply due to my range of motion: tall people have built-in suspension. (y)

So just keep trying. Use as much of your dropper as you need. There are many segments where I just want my dropper a 1/2" down. I can still pedal from the saddle, but I can still float. But yeah, once you get used to it being out of the way for turns, you won't go 1/2 way.

-F
 
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