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I have a 2014 Trek Superfly FS 9.8 sl that I use for fairly technical XC racing and trail riding and I am considering a dropper post. The other day I rode a SRAM demo bike (Scott Spark 29) with a reverb and I liked being able to get lower on the decents. Are they worth the weight penalty? The bike weighs 24.8lbs.(without saddle bag) I am open to any brands but I can get an Xfusion Hilo for about $150. Has anyone had any experience with this post? I don't want to spend a fortune but I will pay a little more for a lighter or more reliable post.
Thanks
 

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XC Hack
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I have a Kindshock i900R on my Kona Hei Hei. Definitely worth it--I don't feel its weight at all. I descend and corner faster and with more confidence. My bike with XT SPDs and the post comes in at 25.25 (prob b/c I'm running a 2.3 tire up front too) I highly reco a remote model. I couldn't imagine reaching back frequently in the heat of a race to trip a lever on the post. I think my post was $200-220ish and I've had no probs at all (riding it for a year now).
 

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Look at it like this, the time you lose climbing with the extra weight( probably no loss in time) will be made up on the descent due to you feeling more comfortable with a lowered saddle.
I was the first person(I owned Hurricane Components at the time) who designed and manufactured what has become the modern day dropper post back in 2001, one of my team racers used it for XC, he wasn't a confident descender, but the dropper post definitely helped him go downhill.
 

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I say if you prefer using a dropper post for the DH sections then use one. My Camber Pro came with the dropper post and I know everyone here think I'm crazy but I rarely found a use for it, even when things got technical. Perhaps I'm just old and stuck in my ways. I ditched it for a carbon seatpost and netted $100. But really, the weight savings weren't that much--the Command Post mine came with weighed about 3/4 pound.
 

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Depends on what your local race courses look like. On some courses the DH sections are easy enough that a dropper post won't make any real difference, on others there's serious time to be made by dropping the saddle down. For example, there's an XC course in my area where they also run 'cross races and the 'cross bikes have no problems getting around the course at full speed. A dropper post would be a waste there. On another course they use a DH run from the enduro course and a DH run from the bike park, a dropper post would be worth a fair amount of time there.
 

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I've ridden lots with a dropper and race competitively. I wouldn't race with a dropper if you're focused on results. While slightly faster descending, you're likely going to find yourself more tired at the bottom of a descent with the seat lowered, and less able to hit the next climb with fresh legs.
 

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I've ridden lots with a dropper and race competitively. I wouldn't race with a dropper if you're focused on results. While slightly faster descending, you're likely going to find yourself more tired at the bottom of a descent with the seat lowered, and less able to hit the next climb with fresh legs.
Why would one's legs be fresher with a rigid post? No one stays seated on descents. Well, I cheat a bit and only "hover" on my saddle as I have a FS bike. Being lower on steep tech stuff feels better to me.

For those who mentioned weight, I'm setting new climbing PRs with the dropper. I guess I overcame any weight penalty with fitness.
 

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I stay seated alot on DH's that are smooth and flowing, try it, you'll be surprised how much more control you'll have due to a lower center of gravity. I learned this technique by a friend who is amazing on the DH's, I was always the fastest descender till he came along, but there still are times and sections that you have to stand or hover.
The weight of a dropper post, maybe 300 grams heavier, will not make a difference and I challenge anyone who says that they can feel the difference while climbing or have slower climb times because of the use of a dropper post, the time you make up on a technical DH using a dropper would make up the "perceived" time you lost while climbing with one.
I've won Cat 1 XC races on a 30lb AM bike with a dropper post as well as winning on a 23 lb carbon FS XC bike on the same course, so I know weight can make a difference and alb difference is huge, but 3/4's of a pound......not.
 

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I'm for sure going to swap to a dropper post for Breck Epic this year. I may toy around with putting it on my race bike, but at the moment I dont feel like heavy swapping consistently back and forth from my fun/enduro machine.... But I am thinking once I use it, I may end up putting it on there full time!
 

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I stay seated alot on DH's that are smooth and flowing, try it, you'll be surprised how much more control you'll have due to a lower center of gravity....


No no no NO.


Seated, your weight is on your saddle. Obvious, I know.

Out of the saddle, you weight is on your pedals.

Which will result in a lower CG?





To the original poster, a dropper post will make all riding scenarios better; its a rhetorical question in my book...
 

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I recently did an XC race with my dropper on and that's the last time I will do that. My bike is 1.5lbs lighter without it. I can totally feel the difference in the swing weight and handling throwing it through corners, as well as on the climbs, especially short steep ones when your sucking for air. If race day adrenaline doesn't motivate you to do push your fastest the dropper surely won't be of much help either.
 

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No no no NO.


Seated, your weight is on your saddle. Obvious, I know.

Out of the saddle, you weight is on your pedals.

Which will result in a lower CG?
Seated.

Your body's CoG is lower when seated than standing.

You are more manoeuvrable and stable when standing because of the decoupling of the bike and rider, allowing you to move relatively independently.
 

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I recently did an XC race with my dropper on and that's the last time I will do that. My bike is 1.5lbs lighter without it. I can totally feel the difference in the swing weight and handling throwing it through corners, as well as on the climbs, especially short steep ones when your sucking for air. If race day adrenaline doesn't motivate you to do push your fastest the dropper surely won't be of much help either.
The last race I did, I ran the bike down 4 sections every lap.

Surprised me as I'd done all of them before with the dropper, no problems.
 

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What dropper post are you running for it to be 1.5 lbs (672 grams)heavier than a regular seat post? if my calculations are correct, the dropper post would be somewhere around 2 lbs, if that's the case, yeah, you probably would feel it, no so much in climbing but in swing weight. What surprises me most, I have never heard of a dropper post that weights that much.
 

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Hurricane, I have a Reverb. No exact weights but the scale reads about 1.5lbs more with the dropper on. And Dude, if I tell you I feel the weight difference on my bike. That's what I feel.
You lose all credibility telling me from your chair behind your computer what I feel on my bike when I'm pedaling it up trials I ride regularly. Droppers are heavy. (I love mine except on race day)
 

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Hurricane, I have a Reverb. No exact weights but the scale reads about 1.5lbs more with the dropper on. And Dude, if I tell you I feel the weight difference on my bike. That's what I feel.
You lose all credibility telling me from your chair behind your computer what I feel on my bike when I'm pedaling it up trials I ride regularly. Droppers are heavy. (I love mine except on race day)
My Specialized Blacklite weighs 550g and the Niner RDO carbon is 220g.
230g (0.5lbs)
 

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I've ridden lots with a dropper and race competitively. I wouldn't race with a dropper if you're focused on results. While slightly faster descending, you're likely going to find yourself more tired at the bottom of a descent with the seat lowered, and less able to hit the next climb with fresh legs.
This is a very intriguing argument. How is this so?

I have not given much thought to improving DH, cause there's plenty of room for improvement in my climbing ;) haha
 

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Not telling you what you feel, maybe your more sensitive in that kinda way. Your weights that you posted were the question and like I said "if the dropper post was 2 lbs. you probably would feel it. If you race with it or without is your choice, the OP asked about using a dropper post for XC, and I said that to about 99.999% wouldn't feel it, you being in the .0001% does, sorry to hurt your feelings.

Thanks NordieBoy for clearing up the confusion on weights.
 

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Will there be a lot of long descents? Doesn't seem worth the hassle (and I guess weight) if not.

My Spark does not have a dropper. It does have the shock-locker-outer (there's got to be word for that but I can't remember right now). Between shifting gears and locking and unlocking the shocks I have enough to think about. Yesterday I did the toughest decent with my shocks completely locked out. I'm sure I'd forget to drop or raise the seat at least once.
 

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Raced XC at Sea Otter this weekend. Took my dropper off my bike for the race and again the bike feels more alive without it on.
 
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