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Toby Wong?
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1,307 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I've been working on laying off the brakes on the turns.

The local trails were perfect last night, moist/dry and tacky. I know I can carry more speed into the turns cause my friend Schralper just dusts me on the downhills. If he can do it, I can go faster too. It's a new sensation for me. It's now like i'm a gaper, I'm pretty fast as it is. But this is my first season on a FS bike and I've had to adjust my technique to take full advantage of the bikes travel. Being an active rider instead of a passive one.


I was weighting the front end more and purposefully using the shock (Fox Vanilla '03), almost pounding it into whatever rut or bank came at me, trusting that it wouldn't buck the front end and would keep the front wheel planted. Also trusting that the Weirwolf up front would keep it's grip. My 5Spot's 69 degree head angle keeps the bike from being really carvy, but it feels like if I get my weight in the cockpit, neutral but more up front, I can carry almost any speed into the turns.

what's your technique for keeping speed up twisty carvy singetrack?
 

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Motion activated
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3,242 Posts
To fully explain the fastest way through a corner(s) would take a lot of text. So just a couple of points.

(1) Unless the single track is beer bottle width, you can still enter wide, apex and track out.
(2) Concentrate on maintaining a high exit speed
(3) Pump the terrain. This will maintain/gain speed when it's too twisty to get in any pedaling in-between successive curves. Basically you compress your arms and legs when you’re going into in the dips, and press up as you rise over the crests, it's just like what you see the skate boarders doing in the 1/2 pipe. There’s a real rhythm to this …… and a big grin factor.

You can also increase your grip anytime (though only momentary) by first compressing you arms and legs (less grip) and the when you need the grip, press yourself up quickly - this will increase the down force on your wheels, giving them more grip.

(4) Use berms to your advantage whenever they're there.

The best way to get good fast is to hit the local ski resort bike shuttle (if you have any close by). Bring limb armor and a full-face helmet, maybe even flat pedals. Do the same trails over and over and over. Push it a little further each time. So much fun even on an XC bike :) .
 

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occupation : Foole
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2,548 Posts
Weighting the front is good....getting up and "hovering " over the seat is good (you can sorta squeeze the seat with your thighs to impart some "body english"when needed...and FORCEFULLY weighting the outside pedal in the downward position (unless, of course, trail obstacles prevent this, clearance-wise)...oh, yeah - it's very good to have a front tire with plenty o' tread :)
 
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