Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
345 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Hardtail with deore components that I put less than 600 miles on. I took the bike into the shop and the cassette and chainrings need replacing as well as the chain (obviously).

Doesn't this seem like a little early in the bike's lifespan for replacing parts like this? I could imagine a new chain, but this doesn't feel right. I clean my bike and use the appropriate lube between each ride unless the bike doesn't get very dirty. Most of the riding that I do falls into hardtail type riding and I can't imagine that I've beat the bike up any more than it's meant to be ridden.

Any thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,488 Posts
The shop said that? It's not unusual to replace a chain at that mileage but a cassette and chainring? I'd expect them to last 3x that, especially the cassette.

Without seeing it, if it were me I'd replace the chain and see how it rides.
 

·
since 4/10/2009
Joined
·
34,568 Posts
component quality, riding conditions, and your maintenance scheme definitely all play roles with longevity.

Yes, sometimes I've worn a chain out in less than 600mi. Sometimes I get more out of it. Usually I get at least 2 chains (maybe 3 if I'm really lucky) out of a cassette. Alu chainrings are going to last less time than steel chainrings, but for alu rings, a similar life span as the cassette is not unusual. Granted, most of the stuff I run is better than Deore level, so maybe Deore doesn't last as long.

It's also possible you clean TOO thoroughly. It's possible you're using the wrong lube for your conditions. It's also possible that while your chain does most likely need to be replaced, the other stuff may not.

Without seeing it, it's hard to say. It's also possible that the shop recommends a full drivetrain replacement if the chain checker they use shows a certain amount of wear (this is what I bet is going on). Basically what that means is that once chain wear gets to a certain point (the cassette and rings will wear along with the chain), a fresh chain on the worn cassette/chainring will actually be WORSE than the old parts. It happens all the time, and we hear about the results of it on the forum.
 

·
Cycologist
Joined
·
10,309 Posts
Why did you take the bike into the shop?

Pix of the drivetrain?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
345 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Why did you take the bike into the shop?

Pix of the drivetrain?
Clunky shifting/noise. Plus it's the beginning of the ride season out here so the bike has been in storage for months. I went in for a tune-up.

Originally it was just the chain that was an issue and he was gonna replace it, but then he called back and said it was the cassette and chainrings that needed it as well. He told me he would go through with the tune-up but wasn't gonna replace the chain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,488 Posts
Clunky shifting/noise. Plus it's the beginning of the ride season out here so the bike has been in storage for months. I went in for a tune-up.

Originally it was just the chain that was an issue and he was gonna replace it, but then he called back and said it was the cassette and chainrings that needed it as well. He told me he would go through with the tune-up but wasn't gonna replace the chain.
I would be very suspect, I was a wrench in shops for many years and it would be really unusual to wear out a cassette in that time. Standard procedure is to measure the chain and as long as it's not too far gone replace and test ride. Generally a chain isn't too far gone @600 miles but I guess anything's possible, maybe you do a crazy amount of climbing per mile.
 

·
Never trust a fart
Joined
·
4,543 Posts
Drivetrain wear is like the question, "How long is a piece of string?". It depends. Riding conditions, maintenance schedule, riding style. Too many variables to determine how long a drivetrain lasts.

If it was me, I would ask how the chain measured. If it's at .75 on a chain checker, I would just have them replace the chain and go ride. If it's measuring at 1.0 or more, then yes, cassette and even possibly the chainring needs replaced.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
slow
Joined
·
7,733 Posts
I typically get 500 or fewer miles per chain. If I ride much longer than that on a chain, I end up wearing cassettes and chainrings enough to require replacement of those items too. My riding style is lots of climbing in big gears, so my drivetrains are under extra stress. The same kind of stress could be on your drivetrain if you are a clydesdale.
 

·
Elitest thrill junkie
Joined
·
39,135 Posts
Drivetrain wear is like the question, "How long is a piece of string?". It depends. Riding conditions, maintenance schedule, riding style. Too many variables to determine how long a drivetrain lasts.

If it was me, I would ask how the chain measured. If it's at .75 on a chain checker, I would just have them replace the chain and go ride. If it's measuring at 1.0 or more, then yes, cassette and even possibly the chainring needs replaced.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
You don't need a chain checker, a 12" ruler works great (and is used by many, many shops).

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/chain-wear.html
 

·
psycho cyclo addict
Joined
·
3,199 Posts
Seems a bit suspect that the shop would replace so many components simultaneously but ya never know... sitting in storage can be a factor (and sometimes defective chains too- I've seen a few SRAM ones that ended up way out of spec- oddly only in one or two areas of the entire chain, after a few hundred miles of use).

I typically get anywhere from 800 - ~1400 miles out of my (9, 10 and 11-speed) chains. Cassettes (or SS cogs) and chain rings last for thousands of miles. Depends a lot on how often I'm riding in muck, dusty trails, ice/snow, slamming through water crossings, etc.

All I do after every ride is: run the chain through a rag for ~5 crank rotations get a good bit of dirt and grim off, lightly lube the chain with Pro Link (rotating the crank until I hit all links) and then remove excess with a clean rag. I measure chain wear every couple of rides primarily with a Park Tool CC-2 chain checker.
 

·
Hitching a ride
Joined
·
3,193 Posts
I'd be suspicious of the chainring needing replacement. I bet the mechanic put a new chain on your bike and it still didn't shift right so he's going to cover all the possibilities with new components so the bike works when he's done with it and it doesn't end up back in his lap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,488 Posts
I'd be suspicious of the chainring needing replacement. I bet the mechanic put a new chain on your bike and it still didn't shift right so he's going to cover all the possibilities with new components so the bike works when he's done with it and it doesn't end up back in his lap.
op said the mechanic didn't replace the chain. I did the same thing all the time, if the chain measured too long I wouldn't replace it without replacing the cassette too and maybe the ring(s) because experience told me that a new chain on other worn drivetrain components caused worse issues than leaving it all alone. My personal experience tells me that 5-700 miles has never been a problem and I can go through 3 chains on 1 cassette with that mileage no problem, probably more but I like being preemptive with that stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,668 Posts
6foot4, as you can see from several responses, there's no one answer to your question about chain/ring/cassette life. I've had chains last nearly 1,000 miles, while others fell apart at 500. Same sort of thing with cassettes. Once constant for me, though, has been two chain-rings for every one cassette. Just too many variables for a catch-all answer. If you have doubts, get a second opinion from another shop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
345 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
6foot4, as you can see from several responses, there's no one answer to your question about chain/ring/cassette life. I've had chains last nearly 1,000 miles, while others fell apart at 500. Same sort of thing with cassettes. Once constant for me, though, has been two chain-rings for every one cassette. Just too many variables for a catch-all answer. If you have doubts, get a second opinion from another shop.
Yep I will probably run it up to another shop and see what they say. The funny thing is the mechanic didn't offer to replace the cassette or the chainring. I'd think that would be the next logical step.

He just told me it would be tuned up and ready for me in a couple of days.

What would be a realistic price on deore quality cassette and chainring replacement with a new chain? I don't plan on doing it myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,171 Posts
Replace the chain and adjust the derailleur. Then take the bike (with the old chain in your pack) on a ride. If the new chain doesn't skip under load, you're fine. Ride it.

However, if the new chain skips under load, put the old chain back on, and ride it until the whole drivetrain dies. Then replace the whole drivetrain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,488 Posts
Replace the chain and adjust the derailleur. Then take the bike (with the old chain in your pack) on a ride. If the new chain doesn't skip under load, you're fine. Ride it.

However, if the new chain skips under load, put the old chain back on, and ride it until the whole drivetrain dies. Then replace the whole drivetrain.
I would recommend this^

As long as it feels smooth and doesn't skip everything's fine.
 

·
Hitching a ride
Joined
·
3,193 Posts
I have about 500 miles on my trail bike chain (HG700) and it measures no measurable wear. I say "about" because I have two chains that I rotate and have done 1300 miles between them. When I hang and tension this chain against a brand new XTR chain, they are the same eyeballed length at the last link.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top