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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got rid of a pair of Crossmax XL (1819 grams on a post office scale) so I am looking for a new pair of custom wheels. I am having a problem choosing hubs. I made my decision ont he rims already. I liked the fact that the XLs were UST and just needed some Stans and I was good to go but the xm819 rims are way too heavy for what I want. True weight once eyelets are added is around 560 grams. So I think I am going to run the DT 4.2 rim with a second choice of the Mavic 717.

Now to the hard part, the hub. I have read all the plusses and minuses of all the hubs and have narrowed my choice down to the DT240s or the King ISO. Both are great hubs and have positives and negatives. The biggest negative with the King seems to be rolling resistance. Has anyone that has tried the mavic, the DT, and the kings really been able to tell a huge difference in rolling resistance? I am trying to see if it is a huge difference that will make a big difference or is it minimal? I dont have the ability to ride all three rims to do a direct comparison. I am a Clydes that is going to start racing this year and price is not an issue. Any other suggestions would be great.
 

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cmil1 said:
... but the xm819 rims are way too heavy for what I want. True weight once eyelets are added is around 560 grams...
Hmmm... Where did you get that? When I built my 819s three years ago the actual rim weight was 460g + 50g for the spoke cups (510g total per rim). Supposedly they are using lighter spoke cups now.

I have been running the new Bonty Rhythm Comp wheels with 28mm wide rims. Claimed weight for the rim is 460g + 45g for the tubeless rim strip. Not sure if the rims are or will be available separately.
 

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i'm running king iso's and yes they do roll slow, especially at first, but they're are soooo smooth. In my opinion if you are not racing kings, they're the way to go. Engagement is so smooth.
 

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conjoinicorned
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i run king iso's as well...

they are slow on the bike stand, but in real life there is no difference that i can detect. i'll make an (educated?) guess that the combined momentum of bike+rider is so much larger than the drag on the little hub bearings, that it's gonna be a non-issue on the trails
 

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Old man on a bike
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I run King classics, King ISOs, DT 240s, a Spot and various Shimanos. The spin down in a stand has virtually nothing to do with your actual riding as far as I'm concerned. Some guys have too much time on their hands while their bikes are in the stands is all I can think of. A poorly adjusted or maintained hub will have more to do with it than trying to judge by brand...IMHO.
 

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After looking at the rolling resistance information that has been spread recently (some of the studies are actually very old) I've become pretty convinced that in mtb riding, resistance at the hubs becomes significant pretty quickly. I ran CK classics until this year, and yes, they're smooth, and yes, they have outstanding engagement for technical terrain. But they do drag, and there are other hubs that don't. If you're big, though, it may not matter as much as durability, and for that you can't beat the Kings. That said, I'm running DT 240s right now and they roll pretty well (though they don't engage like a king when climbing technical stuff).

My race wheels will be built with DT 190s. The DT 190 uses a ceramic bearing, so if you're worried about rolling resistance (and you said yourself that cost is no object), then a ceramic bearing setup can't be beat. DT also claims that the 190 is even more durable than the 240, but since I'm pretty small, it's not a really big concern for me. I believe you can get a ceramic upgrade kit for a King hub as well, but it would cost even more, and you'd have to find someone with the hub rebuild tools so you could replace bearings on a brand new set of hubs, which sounds like a big fat pain in the arse if you ask me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all of your answers. I will be riding/racing XC in Texas so long technical climbs wont be a constant. I will use these wheels for race and training. For the record I am around 230 pounds. If I have never ridden a hub with the engagement of a king I may never know the difference. I could tell a huge difference in rolling when I went from my old hubs to my Crossmax XL. It was like night and day. I just dont want to get kings and think back about how much faster the Crossmas XLs were. I may look into ceramic bearings for the 240s.
 

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shiggy said:
Hmmm... Where did you get that? When I built my 819s three years ago the actual rim weight was 460g + 50g for the spoke cups (510g total per rim). Supposedly they are using lighter spoke cups now.

I have been running the new Bonty Rhythm Comp wheels with 28mm wide rims. Claimed weight for the rim is 460g + 45g for the tubeless rim strip. Not sure if the rims are or will be available separately.
The Rhythm rims will be available as a rim only. However, only in a 28 configuration.

Side note, I just spent a day riding around the Austin area and these would be the perfect wheels here with a 2.1-2.3 tire. Nice thing about these wheels is that you can get the tire performance of a wider tire while using a narrower one. Less casing=lower overall weight

Cheers
 

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A wheelist
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cmil1 said:
I could tell a huge difference in rolling when I went from my old hubs to my Crossmax XL. It was like night and day. I just dont want to get kings and think back about how much faster the Crossmas XLs were.
Somehow I doubt that the difference in your hubs was ".......like night and day". Maybe some kind of machine could measure the wattage difference in power loss (or gain) but are we sensitive enough to 'feel' it while riding? I have my doubts.

Some kind of simpler "roll down" test might identify a difference. Everyone says that the Kings with more 'bike stand' drag will not be noticable on the trail and I agree. I went overnight (almost) from DT 240 to Kings and I didn't notice one bit of difference. I was slow before and I was just as slow after.

The King seal drag has still got to be there on the trail though. It doesn't miraculously vanish when we lift the bike from the stand. I just think it's too slight to be noticable.
 
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