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Who are the brain police?
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There was downhilling before suspension, no?
 

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It depends on the course

If you're a smooth rider the 5 inches should be enough. You're not going to be flying down the course, but you shouldn't have a problem either. While riding the DH courses last year, I would see some XCers in 3-5 inch bikes on the DH trails w/ 6 inch rotors. But they were having a tough time and were walking some of the sections. BTW, this was at BB last year, which were pro DH courses.

The 6 inch rotors should be enough if you're a light-weight rider. I weigh 190 and went with my friend once to BB. He let me use his Heckler with 6 inch rotors and I was having a hard time braking after the 4th run. I ended up burning the pads because there was so much friction. So I wouldn't recommend doing a lot of runs if your weight is up there.

Don't be discouraged though. People were doing DH with no suspension and V-brakes in years back.
 

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It's rider choice.
I think too many people use suspension as a crutch.
Yes it may make you faster, but theres soo many riders with big travel bike who just plow through sections rather than trying to be smooth and carry your speed.
I see alot of unskilled riders who are just fast because of the bike...not their skill.
 

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Ya I agree with freeriderizzle, I ride DH and NS stuff on a 5 inch travel hardtail. I like to use technical skill not lean on 8 inches of travel. Also in those slow sections as in hilly sections and flat sections I kick butt because my hardtail can out sprint and out climb those big bikes. The 5 inches is fine but you many want to get an adapter so you can put 8 inch rotors on in the future if you begin to want to race more competively. What type of bike do you have? Or are you buying a new one?
 

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WHAT HAS SCIENCE DONE!?!
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A friend of mine rode his XP at Big Bear last season. It's not going to win any races, but you can have fun on it.

If you're going to go downhilling on a Weyless XP, make sure you check the intersection of the chainstay/seatsay (right before the rear axle) for cracks after every ride. The newer XPs have a gusset plate welded on the bottom, the older ones don't. If you don't have one with the gusset, you can likely count on the bike cracking there. If you don't, it's not a big problem, just check for cracks after every ride and when/if you get one, Supergo will give you a new rear triangle right quick. (If you don't have the gusset, you might also inquire as to whether they'll advance-replace the rear triangle...not sure if they'll do it).
 

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Trevor! said:
Don't doubt peoples ability to ride **** harsh terrain on a rigid just because you doubt your abilities. :rolleyes:
woa, easy now, lets not jump to conclusions, i wasnt doubting anyones abilities

let me make an analogy:

rigid bike:smooth
new big travel bike:rough

similar to:

old school nascar:not as fast
modern nascar:fast

wut i was saying was that as new technologies evolve, new rules, obstacles to incorporate them, thus the rigid dh bikes of the old were probably acompanied by smoother courses, as suspension came about, courses probably became more challenging or rough.........

...........duh?!?! :rolleyes:
 

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Skygrounder said:
A friend of mine rode his XP at Big Bear last season. It's not going to win any races, but you can have fun on it.

If you're going to go downhilling on a Weyless XP, make sure you check the intersection of the chainstay/seatsay (right before the rear axle) for cracks after every ride. The newer XPs have a gusset plate welded on the bottom, the older ones don't. If you don't have one with the gusset, you can likely count on the bike cracking there. If you don't, it's not a big problem, just check for cracks after every ride and when/if you get one, Supergo will give you a new rear triangle right quick. (If you don't have the gusset, you might also inquire as to whether they'll advance-replace the rear triangle...not sure if they'll do it).
Not sure what your talking about, could you send a picture? I know mine is the 04 model with Easton RAD.
 

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ya i ride DH on a HT aswell cause i cant afford a FS yet, but my fork is slightly broken so im runnin sub 4-inches of travel. The stuff around here is pretty technical. Its anoying at times cause my fork will bottom out left and right but the day i used my friends FS the ride was incredible and it was smoother than hell. Friend could barely keep up and it goes to show, if u learn how to ride well with the limitations that u have (i.e HT and a 80mm fork) u become a much better rider when u upgrade to bigger and better things.
 

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Australien
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WeylessXPRider said:
Anybody here do Downhilling with a bike with 5 inch of travel or less?
As well as 6 inch rotors?
I rode enough DH sections and courses on my old hardtail with 3" in the front (albeit slowly). I've got 5x5 now, and it's more than enough for me (and I'm still slow). Even if I had a SC V10, someone like Nathan Rennie would **** all over me on a single speed hardtail...
 

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Moutain bike action magazine says the ideal bike is a 25 pound 5-6 inch travel bike ...of course this varies on how extreme you go but i think its a fairly good assesment. also i ride a 5 inch front hardtail and have no problem.
 

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Glad to Be Alive
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sooners said:
Moutain bike action magazine says the ideal bike is a 25 pound 5-6 inch travel bike ...of course this varies on how extreme you go but i think its a fairly good assesment. also i ride a 5 inch front hardtail and have no problem.
Mountain Bike Action...is the worst mag in my opinion. They write what their sponsors(advertisers) want. They are hypocrites too. RC sucks. Never trust that mag ever !!!
 

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sooners said:
Moutain bike action magazine says the ideal bike is a 25 pound 5-6 inch travel bike ...of course this varies on how extreme you go but i think its a fairly good assesment. also i ride a 5 inch front hardtail and have no problem.
Please show me a decent 5-6 inch travel dual suspension bike that weighs 25lbs and doesn't cost a fortune. MBA has been blowing **** out of their mouths for several years now.

5 inches is fine. I raced sport DH on a hardtail with about 5 inches and 6 inch discs for a year. Lots of fun. Be warned that if you want to be competitive you will probably end up hurting yourself as pushing the limits on a hardtail is a bit harsher on your body than when on an FS.

The Ito
 

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its mostaly all skill. i fyou have the skill, you will be able to use suspension to your advantage and be that much better because of the technology. for years, before i got serious enough to really drop some cash on a decent bike, i rode a super old fully rigid cromo hardrock (that my neighbor gave me out of his basement when he moved nontheless). i went from backpacking to mtbking, so i started riding the trails i was familiar with from hiking, trails that were fairly technical. i would ride trails in pisgah on that bike that i saw ppl riding full on DH bikes on. granted i couldnt go quite as fast as them, but i could hold my own. just a few months ago, there was a fat tire festival at a local trail that is really rock and rough and technical. my mtb was in peices because i had my trials bike put together at the time. i threw my clipless pedals on my trusty old hardrock (now a singlespeed with only a front canti brake and a road stem) and passed several people on full sus ellsworth and other nice expensive bikes. 99.9999% of riding is skill.
 

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I find it odd that some will knock long travel DH bikes contending that skill is a true factor for riding. Well I don't care if riding a rigid thru a DH course makes you a better rider I want to ride my bike and have fun. Fun means , for me, not beating myself up. I'd rather ride longer and let the bike take some abuse than my person. So is it the " Arrow or ***** " that makes for a better rider ? who cares as long as you are having fun or winning races. Sure you can ride DH w/ less travel just remember you may find yourself going a little slower , working a bit more or tiring a little sooner.
 

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JRuss said:
Ya I agree with freeriderizzle, I ride DH and NS stuff on a 5 inch travel hardtail. I like to use technical skill not lean on 8 inches of travel. Also in those slow sections as in hilly sections and flat sections I kick butt because my hardtail can out sprint and out climb those big bikes. The 5 inches is fine but you many want to get an adapter so you can put 8 inch rotors on in the future if you begin to want to race more competively. What type of bike do you have? Or are you buying a new one?
how does a hardtail have suspension?

unless you mean the forks...

but anyway... i'm gonna start dh on a 6" travel bike by the end of the year (i hope)
 
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