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Pikes with no adapter are 180. If you check your adapter it'll say something like "180 to 203 PM" and it'll be about 11mm thick.

You'll never in a million years notice that weight savings, but you'll definitely notice a lack of braking power! I wouldnt do it unless you're specifically having a problem with the front end locking up.
 

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Pikes with no adapter are 180. If you check your adapter it'll say something like "180 to 203 PM" and it'll be about 11mm thick.

You'll never in a million years notice that weight savings, but you'll definitely notice a lack of braking power! I wouldnt do it unless you're specifically having a problem with the front end locking up.
Agreed. Wouldn't recommend dropping to 180mm. However, if you do please send me your rotor and adapter. (seriously)
 

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I would have no qualms going to 180. But I really haven't ever lacked braking power as long as everything was working properly. If anything, I had brakes that were too grabby, and bigger rotors could exacerbate that.
 

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I could understand doing this with shimano brakes, but with guides...? Tweaking the lever reach and/or pad compound is plenty to adjust the feel, without crippling performance. I'm curious about OP's reasoning.


You may or may not need new bolts. It's easy to check (remove the adapter and see if you bottom out), and every shop i've worked at would be happy to give you the correct size if necessary. They accumulate them because nobody downgrades rotors.
 

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I’m curious as well as to the rationale for the downgrade. Having 180s front and rear on all my bikes, I have been suffering from acute rotor envy for some time now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So my current situation with the front brake is like here: https://forums.mtbr.com/brake-time/...en-piston-advancement-retraction-1044785.html

Took the bike to LBS where they changed the caliper. Still looked the same so took it back for a re-check but was told that it's fine as it is. So I am able to align the caliper so that it does not rub (pain in the ass tho because pistons are so uneven) when driving straight, but on uphills or tight curves it still rubs a bit. LBS also told that switching to smaller rotor would probably fix the mentioned rub as smaller rotor would warp less under stress.

Current rotor is almost dead straight - would probably bend it more if tried to fix :)

To me, that caliper does not look 100% OK and in the other thread OP got new one from SRAM under warranty.

Have already resetted the pistons multiple times and still the inner side pistons move out much more while not retracting much. Outer side pistons barely move.
 

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So my current situation with the front brake is like here: https://forums.mtbr.com/brake-time/...en-piston-advancement-retraction-1044785.html

Took the bike to LBS where they changed the caliper. Still looked the same so took it back for a re-check but was told that it's fine as it is. So I am able to align the caliper so that it does not rub (pain in the ass tho because pistons are so uneven) when driving straight, but on uphills or tight curves it still rubs a bit. LBS also told that switching to smaller rotor would probably fix the mentioned rub as smaller rotor would warp less under stress.

Current rotor is almost dead straight - would probably bend it more if tried to fix :)

To me, that caliper does not look 100% OK and in the other thread OP got new one from SRAM under warranty.

Have already resetted the pistons multiple times and still the inner side pistons move out much more while not retracting much. Outer side pistons barely move.
A different sized rotor wont change any of this behavior. How do you align your caliper with your rotor?

Pistons sticking is quite common. Most of the time I find cleaning them up and exercising them works pretty well.

  1. Remove wheel and pads
  2. Do a full brake bleed so you know your not fighting an air bubble in the Caliper.

    Once the brake bleed is completed
  3. Squeeze brake lever so Pistons start to come out,
  4. If one side is coming out faster put pressure on those pistons, the slower pistons should start coming out.
  5. Once the pistons are out pretty far clean them up with a Qtip with a little ISO alcohol on them
  6. Once cleaned I lubricate the pistons with whatever brake fluid is designed for the system
  7. Press the pistons back in fully and start working the lever.
  8. You may need to repeat step 7 multiple times, but as long as nothing is terribly wrong the pistons will start coming more equally.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
A different sized rotor wont change any of this behavior. How do you align your caliper with your rotor?

Pistons sticking is quite common. Most of the time I find cleaning them up and exercising them works pretty well.

  1. Remove wheel and pads
  2. Do a full brake bleed so you know your not fighting an air bubble in the Caliper.

    Once the brake bleed is completed
  3. Squeeze brake lever so Pistons start to come out,
  4. If one side is coming out faster put pressure on those pistons, the slower pistons should start coming out.
  5. Once the pistons are out pretty far clean them up with a Qtip with a little ISO alcohol on them
  6. Once cleaned I lubricate the pistons with whatever brake fluid is designed for the system
  7. Press the pistons back in fully and start working the lever.
  8. You may need to repeat step 7 multiple times, but as long as nothing is terribly wrong the pistons will start coming more equally.
I align the caliper with the rotor first by eye so rotor sits in the middle and then spin the wheel to make sure it does not rub anywhere, then tighten up at the correct spot.

I would have thought that LBS did bleed the brakes while changing the caliper but I guess I'll try that next.

Exercising the pistons is a bit tricky since I have to put pressure on 2 pistons on the other side :) Would need some kind of custom bleed block that would hold those 2 in place while allowing other side to move.

Thanks everyone!
 

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I align the caliper with the rotor first by eye so rotor sits in the middle and then spin the wheel to make sure it does not rub anywhere, then tighten up at the correct spot.

I would have thought that LBS did bleed the brakes while changing the caliper but I guess I'll try that next.

Exercising the pistons is a bit tricky since I have to put pressure on 2 pistons on the other side :) Would need some kind of custom bleed block that would hold those 2 in place while allowing other side to move.

Thanks everyone!
To align the rotor you should back the caliper bolts out just enough so the caliper can move around freely on the bolts. Spin the wheel, grab and hold the brake. With the brake held tighten the caliper bolts, if your rotor is true you caliper will be perfectly aligned.

You also don't need a custom bleed block for 4 pots, a 17mm box end wrench will work perfectly for holding both pistons.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

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Exercising the pistons is a bit tricky since I have to put pressure on 2 pistons on the other side :) Would need some kind of custom bleed block that would hold those 2 in place while allowing other side to move.

Thanks everyone!
I find a plastic tire lever is effective. You really only want to hold back the "fast" pistons to get the "slow" ones out, cleaned, and moving freely again. This can be a time consuming process the first few times, but definitely worth it for dialed brakes.
 

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As far as step 5, tread carefully. There's a fine line between piston out enough to clean thoroughly and piston on the floor, and it's about one lever squeeze.

I imagine there's a few folks around here that can vouch for that.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
 

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As far as step 5, tread carefully. There's a fine line between piston out enough to clean thoroughly and piston on the floor, and it's about one lever squeeze.

I imagine there's a few folks around here that can vouch for that.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
Including myself! I should have mentioned that, when they look like their pretty far out, then there out far enough!
 

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Yep. Done it myself a few times. It's an annoyance but no biggie. Usually you can just push it back it but if it does fall out completely it gives you an opportunity to really clean the piston and wipe out the bore with a lint-free wiper. Stick it back in and bleed.
 

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So I am able to align the caliper so that it does not rub (pain in the ass tho because pistons are so uneven) when driving straight, but on uphills or tight curves it still rubs a bit. LBS also told that switching to smaller rotor would probably fix the mentioned rub as smaller rotor would warp less under stress.
I think your LBS is grasping at straws. Typically 200mm rotors are 2mm thick, and smaller ones are 1.8mm. There are exceptions, but 200 rotors are usually the most resistant to warp.

But i agree with them; intermittent rub isn't worth stressing over.

Other stuff to check- PMs are faced correctly, decent torque on through axle, no slop in hub bearings. Also aligning by eye can introduce problems, ironically.
 
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