Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,011 Posts
Also, depends on tubes. I run Maxxis 2.5 and 2.7s at 32 psi rear and 26 psi front with thin tubes.

I also run Kenda Nevegal DH 2.35s at 32 psi rear and 28 psi front.

Usually anthing over 30 psi works. For resort riding I run 32 psi front and 34 psi rear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I usually like having my tires, maxxis dh minion with maxxis dh tube, hard and full of air around like 40- 50 psi. Is their any problem with having this much air in the tire??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,453 Posts
Stinkyboy58 said:
I usually like having my tires, maxxis dh minion with maxxis dh tube, hard and full of air around like 40- 50 psi. Is their any problem with having this much air in the tire??
Experiment ! Find a pressure that you are comfortable with. If you like 40-50 psi. run that amount. Personally I run about F - 26 psi R - 32 psi for DH, anything more than 35psi feels like my traction is suffering. If I run less than 30psi in the rear my rims seem to flat spot.
 
G

·
I use 40 psi, Im on a dh hardtail and dont like tire play, and I do alot of street riding, and its easier on street with harder tires
 

·
Innovate or die!
Joined
·
702 Posts
Yeah dont run your stuff under about 22 psi........... flat spotted and ruined rims become very common unless you are runnin mofo tires and rims.

I have tubeless and i run 26- to 29 psi in the front tire, get about same traction as when i ran them at 12 psi.

to answer your question:

28 front 33 rear for DH

32 front 36 rear for jumpin/trails

36 front 42 rear for urban

all on the same DH bike----
 

·
N* Bomber Crew
Joined
·
4,271 Posts
Here's how we do things:

Local: 30 PSI
Northstar: 40 PSI (Anti Pinch-flats)
Sea Otter: 25-30 PSI (Really depends)
Cougar Mountain: Don't remember...I think 30 PSI
Other Stuff: 35 PSI

I'm almost always 35-40 PSI. I tried running lower at Sea Otter and it paid off in the dusty S turn area and log drop, but kinda got slowed down. I cranked it up slightly. I also learned that you need to run higher PSI to prevent pinchies at Northstar.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,555 Posts
Since I do a lot of DJ and urban, my retarded LBS put my pressures at 70 psi front and rear on my 2.35 Maxxis Minion DH/FR tires...
 

·
G3Riders
Joined
·
168 Posts
30-40 psi is huge!

I tend to ride as low pressure as I can (and not to pinch-flat) in the mountains, especially in wet. Usually have 0.2-0.5atm difference between rear and front tires. When I ride some local "jumps", I'd bring up pressure fo sure.

My experience so far (never ridden UST) I could call good setup:
- Intense Intruder DH FRO 2.5, 0.9atm/13psi, front
- Maxxis Minions DH 40,42, High Rollers DH 2.5 40, 42, 1.1atm/16psi front
- Kenda Nevgal StickE DH 2.5, 1.2atm/17psi, front

Yes, I may be lacking some speed due to high rolling resistance but mostly I ride on steep trails within slow/medium speeds. Lot's of rocks and roots. Usually not so dry.

I weight 71kg/157lbs. No huge air, no Whistler-like trails. More like singletrail extreme.
 

·
Glad to Be Alive
Joined
·
43,009 Posts
yoonior said:
I tend to ride as low pressure as I can (and not to pinch-flat) in the mountains, especially in wet. Usually have 0.2-0.5atm difference between rear and front tires. When I ride some local "jumps", I'd bring up pressure fo sure.

My experience so far (never ridden UST) I could call good setup:
- Intense Intruder DH FRO 2.5, 0.9atm/13psi, front
- Maxxis Minions DH 40,42, High Rollers DH 2.5 40, 42, 1.1atm/16psi front
- Kenda Nevgal StickE DH 2.5, 1.2atm/17psi, front

Yes, I may be lacking some speed due to high rolling resistance but mostly I ride on steep trails within slow/medium speeds. Lot's of rocks and roots. Usually not so dry.

I weight 71kg/157lbs. No huge air, no Whistler-like trails. More like singletrail extreme.
just wondering, no flaming....don't you find when you corner hard the tire kind of jumps to the side....does feel all there when you turn???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,381 Posts
yoonior said:
I tend to ride as low pressure as I can (and not to pinch-flat) in the mountains, especially in wet. Usually have 0.2-0.5atm difference between rear and front tires. When I ride some local "jumps", I'd bring up pressure fo sure.

My experience so far (never ridden UST) I could call good setup:
- Intense Intruder DH FRO 2.5, 0.9atm/13psi, front
- Maxxis Minions DH 40,42, High Rollers DH 2.5 40, 42, 1.1atm/16psi front
- Kenda Nevgal StickE DH 2.5, 1.2atm/17psi, front

Yes, I may be lacking some speed due to high rolling resistance but mostly I ride on steep trails within slow/medium speeds. Lot's of rocks and roots. Usually not so dry.

I weight 71kg/157lbs. No huge air, no Whistler-like trails. More like singletrail extreme.
This guy knows what he's talking about. I think anything over 20 psi in a DH tire with heavy side walls is plain stupid. I've found that 2.5 Kenda Nevegal DH tires start losing a lot of traction in wet rooty rocky conditions when they go over 20 psi.

If you have to run high pressure to keep cornering control then you have WAAAY too skinny rims for your tires. I think about 90% of the DHFR guys out there actually have too large of tires for their rim size. I run the nevegal 2.5 on a 39mm wide rim. I can run it down to -9- psi and still not have it fold over in corners. Most other people I see stupidly cram large tires like these onto 29mm rims and wonder why they can't corner worth a damn. :rolleyes:

There's also the traction issue. Someone living in SoCAL isn't going to worry about wet rocks and roots most of the time, so traction in that sense isn't needed. On the other hand, North Shore wet riders like myself need every bit of traction we can get for stunts and wet roots.

If you live in any area thet's wet, you need to run heavy sticky tires at a low PSI on a rim that is wide enough.

I can't stress enough how imprtant it is to use the right size tire for the rim. Most of you are running 2.5-2.8 tires on rims that shouldn't see anything more than a 2.35, thus you compensate for the total lack of cornering control with high PSI and thus destroy your traction.

With a wide rim you get both cornering control and traction. Remember, bigger isn't always better. Your bike will rail corners much better with larger rims or smaller tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
969 Posts
larger rims or smaller tires...

SpawningGround said:
If you have to run high pressure to keep cornering control then you have WAAAY too skinny rims for your tires. I think about 90% of the DHFR guys out there actually have too large of tires for their rim size.
Amen! Seems so many people miss the "right rim for the tire" point. I learend from experience myself. Wish I'd purchased wider rims, but I didn't, so I went with narrower tires (2.5 / 2.35) and handling improved.

SpawningGround said:
This guy knows what he's talking about. I think anything over 20 psi in a DH tire with heavy side walls is plain stupid. I've found that 2.5 Kenda Nevegal DH tires start losing a lot of traction in wet rooty rocky conditions when they go over 20 psi.

If you have to run high pressure to keep cornering control then you have WAAAY too skinny rims for your tires. I think about 90% of the DHFR guys out there actually have too large of tires for their rim size. I run the nevegal 2.5 on a 39mm wide rim. I can run it down to -9- psi and still not have it fold over in corners. Most other people I see stupidly cram large tires like these onto 29mm rims and wonder why they can't corner worth a damn. :rolleyes:

There's also the traction issue. Someone living in SoCAL isn't going to worry about wet rocks and roots most of the time, so traction in that sense isn't needed. On the other hand, North Shore wet riders like myself need every bit of traction we can get for stunts and wet roots.

If you live in any area thet's wet, you need to run heavy sticky tires at a low PSI on a rim that is wide enough.

I can't stress enough how imprtant it is to use the right size tire for the rim. Most of you are running 2.5-2.8 tires on rims that shouldn't see anything more than a 2.35, thus you compensate for the total lack of cornering control with high PSI and thus destroy your traction.

With a wide rim you get both cornering control and traction. Remember, bigger isn't always better. Your bike will rail corners much better with larger rims or smaller tires.
 

·
G3Riders
Joined
·
168 Posts
SHIVER ME TIMBERS said:
just wondering, no flaming....don't you find when you corner hard the tire kind of jumps to the side....does feel all there when you turn???
As I mentioned before, we don't ride here any Whistler-alike trails. No really high-speed stuff, rather slow technical riding. Most of trails we ride are not groomed/prepared mtbiking trails but sort of hiking trails similiar sometimes to narrow Alpine trails.

Stuff we ride is usually steep with lots of roots and rocks. We barely can go full throttle on wide open :)

Some of my friends are running higher pressures like 30-40psi but in my opinion they're lacking so welcomed traction in extreme conditions.

I'm using tires no larger than 2.5" and have/had wheels on Mavic D521 or F219 (both are 28mm).

If you never used Intense Intruder FRO you wouldn't believe how stiff this tire is. Almost impossible to fold this tire even without any air inside.

I'm not saying that this kind of low pressure will work in all riding conditions and in places like hot California etc. But here in our local mountains it does work very well. I had also similiar pressures while riding high alpine trails in Swiss Alps.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top