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OP, next time, just look around for a stick that's longer than the snake, and 'herd' it to one side or the other of the trail. Snakes can't strike more than 50% of their length. Mr. Hawg prolly even has video of himself subduing and moving them. We really don't want to see them killed, they keep the rat numbers down.
 

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That's weird that it's sleeping stretched across the trail. I'd expect it to be in a more sheltered place.

This emmereffer:

Rock Bedrock Outcrop Geology Geological phenomenon


Balled up in a rut on a trail I was walking with my dog. That pic was taken going uphill and just after coming around a bush that was sticking out and obscuring the snake. So lucky my dog was swinging out to our left and not going straight up that rut. It was in the morning so it probably hadn't "thawed out" yet.
 

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That's weird that it's sleeping stretched across the trail. I'd expect it to be in a more sheltered place.

This emmereffer:

View attachment 1273965

Balled up in a rut on a trail I was walking with my dog. That pic was taken going uphill and just after coming around a bush that was sticking out and obscuring the snake. So lucky my dog was swinging out to our left and not going straight up that rut. It was in the morning so it probably hadn't "thawed out" yet.
I used to think it was weird too, but I have seen other species asleep in the middle of the trail or fire road as well as rattlers. It simply dozed off. We take naps, and so do snakes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Lol...it got super mad at that rock.
Served it's purpose to get it off the trail. He wasn't too happy about it.

I'd be ruined for the rest of my ride thinking every stick was another snake. Haha
Sometimes it's hard to tell from a distance. Specially if you're going fast.

The snake was asleep. I've seen that many times. I biggest clue is that it was not frequently flicking it's tongue, if at all.
Didn't think about that. For a minute, I thought he may be dead.

That's weird that it's sleeping stretched across the trail. I'd expect it to be in a more sheltered place.

Balled up in a rut on a trail I was walking with my dog. That pic was taken going uphill and just after coming around a bush that was sticking out and obscuring the snake. So lucky my dog was swinging out to our left and not going straight up that rut. It was in the morning so it probably hadn't "thawed out" yet.
I don't take my dogs hiking in the trails anymore because of the snakes. Many years ago, a friend's dog died. He didn't even know his dog was bitten until after it dropped in the middle of the trail and he had to take him to the vet. Poor thing didn't make it. And contrary to popular belief, they don't always rattle before striking.
 

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The snake was asleep. I've seen that many times. I biggest clue is that it was not frequently flicking it's tongue, if at all.
Yep, Howard the OP that was the funniest yet most excruciating vids I've seen in awhile. I wanted to > Is these type of encounters grab a stick longer that the length of the snake and move him along. Pretty good entertainment though, thanks for sharing.
 

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Talk about a coinkydink! This morning:

Soil Sunlight Trail Bicycle wheel rim Dirt road


Soil Geology Reptile Sand Snake


You can see where my tire stopped and the footprints of me slowly backing away.

This one was not sleeping -- tongue was flicking out -- and by the time I had a mouth full of water to chase it off, it started to slither off the trail.

Happy trails little danger noodle!
 

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That sound! Gets me everytime.


If the snake won't move(rare since they are scared of us) you can get a long stick and pin the head to the ground, gently but firmly, and then pick up the snake right at the base of the neck and give it a gentle toss to get him off the trail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Let's get this straight. You know, this is like one of those warnings that should never have to be said, but we're gonna say it anyways.

It is NOT advisable to put a stick over a venomous snake's head and grab it by your hand and move it off the trail. No, it shouldn't even be listed as an option. You shouldn't even have to think about it.

But, if you think "a moderator said it, so it must be safe", and you live in the U.S., then make sure you know how much anti-venom costs. Then make sure you can afford your health insurance deductible, because no matter how high, you'll hit it. Also, calculate potential costs of air lift to a hospital. Then calculate how many vacation days you have left from work and how much disability insurance will pay for time missed without a paycheck.

But if you live in Canada, go ahead and pick it up. Play with it a while. Try some of those tricks you see on YouTube, like try kissing it on the head while pretending it's a Cobra. At least the pain you will feel will not be financial.
 

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Slightly off topic here but has anyone seen tarantulas lately?

I saw one just chilling in the middle of the top of lynx trail in aliso canyon, then saw another on the bottom fire road. so scare
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Slightly off topic here but has anyone seen tarantulas lately?

I saw one just chilling in the middle of the top of lynx trail in aliso canyon, then saw another on the bottom fire road. so scare
Yes, tons! Due to the heat, I've been biking in the evening. Around 7:30 pm, I see a lot more wildlife than I see during the day. Lots of tarantulas, rabbits, and coyotes. This is in the dirt Mullholand-Sullivan area. Not sure if it's because of the heat, or because I'm biking when it's about to get dark.
 
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