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I‘m not a Boomer but I really don’t understand how an attack on an age group is productive or “helpful” Hording wealth brah? Is that what you call it. Typically wealth accumulates over time: hard work, saving and investing. Therefore typically, the older you get the wealthier.

You can also take a walk around Silicon Valley. Plenty of newly minted millionaire millennials. If you think bike prices are exorbitant, try to buy a modest house there.

The pursuit of financial security for many is part of their pursuit of happiness regardless of age. There are alternatives, Cuba, Venezuela, the former Soviet Union, but things didin‘t work out so well in those socialist utopias where ”wealth hording” was officially frowned upon.
Lol so you voted for Reagan? You created the problem
 

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It might be helpful to point out that the Boomer generation has managed to hoard most of the wealth in the US and is the only generation capable of paying the insanely exorbitant prices the industry demands in any sort of sustainable fashion.
It's not rocket science, it's discipline. Write out your budget, get out of debt, build an emergency fund, start saving/investing for your future. The only people you screw in the process are the credit card companies :D
 

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A message to the bike businesses that make all this great and expensive stuff. The guys that started mountain biking as a thing are now getting into their sixties and seventies. We're still riding and hope to ride forever. However, there are lots of companies out there that seem to think all riders are 25 with ideal bodies. There are two products that have been especially problematic for me. You likely have encountered issues too.

Handlebars. There has been thread after thread about wrist, elbow, and shoulder pain in the old farts forum and this one. I've now got Surly Terminal bars on my FS bike to try to match the angle and height of the grips to my hands where they naturally fall on the bars but 35 degrees is too much sweep and my hands still hit badly, just opposite of the stock bars. Too much sweep after too little sweep. Fatback made a bar with 16 degrees of sweep but it doesn't seem to be available. SQ labs comes close. We older folks need a range of bars with sweeps from about 15 to 20 degrees to complement the narrow assortment of swept back bars that typically sweep 25 to even 45 degrees.

Shoes. As people get older, arches fail (from abuse in my case) and feet get longer and wider. At this point, the only shoes that fit at all comfortably are some of the Lake shoes that come in a wide. We need an assortment of widths to fit older feet and there are a lot of older riders - just hit the trails on a weekday and you'll see us.

So, get with the picture and serve this growing portion of the mtb community and make some money while doing it.

Anyone got anything to add to this list?
You need to become a better shopper. The incredible product choices sure help my 6th decade. We used to have a few designs that were all mostly stupid from copying how racers sat on top of road bikes. Now we have many types of bikes, handlebars, stems, shoes and more. Not only those sloping top tubes to accommodate the scrotum as has been pointed out but nice wide and long seats. Clothing to let it all air out with ease.
 

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Keep things simple
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Methinks referencing age has to do with older riders tired of having “what sells” stuff thrust upon them, and being done with it.

I wish I had all I spent on “what sells” items or what was marketed or pushed hard, that were minimally beneficial to me.
 

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2021 Hightower CC XT
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It might be helpful to point out that the Boomer generation has managed to hoard most of the wealth in the US and is the only generation capable of paying the insanely exorbitant prices the industry demands in any sort of sustainable fashion.

BTW, drop bars are the answer to your first question, arch supports to the second.
Show us on the doll where the 401k hurt you.
 

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A message to the bike businesses that make all this great and expensive stuff. The guys that started mountain biking as a thing are now getting into their sixties and seventies. We're still riding and hope to ride forever. However, there are lots of companies out there that seem to think all riders are 25 with ideal bodies. There are two products that have been especially problematic for me. You likely have encountered issues too.

Handlebars. There has been thread after thread about wrist, elbow, and shoulder pain in the old farts forum and this one. I've now got Surly Terminal bars on my FS bike to try to match the angle and height of the grips to my hands where they naturally fall on the bars but 35 degrees is too much sweep and my hands still hit badly, just opposite of the stock bars. Too much sweep after too little sweep. Fatback made a bar with 16 degrees of sweep but it doesn't seem to be available. SQ labs comes close. We older folks need a range of bars with sweeps from about 15 to 20 degrees to complement the narrow assortment of swept back bars that typically sweep 25 to even 45 degrees.

Shoes. As people get older, arches fail (from abuse in my case) and feet get longer and wider. At this point, the only shoes that fit at all comfortably are some of the Lake shoes that come in a wide. We need an assortment of widths to fit older feet and there are a lot of older riders - just hit the trails on a weekday and you'll see us.

So, get with the picture and serve this growing portion of the mtb community and make some money while doing it.

Anyone got anything to add to this list?
Amen to all of that. I'm 72 and since March 31, I've put in 127 days riding mountain and road and almost 100k climbing and 2000 miles. As far as shoes, I switched to flats a couple years ago and my 5/10's fit fine and I'm still enjoying my Sidi road shoes that are probably 15 years old. Now shorts, on the other hand, are a major issue. Does anyone still make them with belt loops that go all the way around. Velcro doesn't cut it and I am tired of them riding down on me as I ride hard. Roadie shorts, on the other hand, are not a problem.

Anyway, gotta' run. I have a picket line I need to join.......
 

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Yeah but old people are so persnickety.

I just wanted to work “persnickety” into the conversation cuz oldsters love it.
=sParty

P.S. @Rev Bubba, I’m with you on the belt loop thing.

P.P.S. @D. Inoobinati, Phizer makes a blue pill that fixes everything. Last summer @Scott O had a big party (he forgot to invite the wimmins) and showed us his quart jar full o’ them pills… but nobody to use ‘em on.
 

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Amen to all of that. I'm 72 and since March 31, I've put in 127 days riding mountain and road and almost 100k climbing and 2000 miles. As far as shoes, I switched to flats a couple years ago and my 5/10's fit fine and I'm still enjoying my Sidi road shoes that are probably 15 years old. Now shorts, on the other hand, are a major issue. Does anyone still make them with belt loops that go all the way around. Velcro doesn't cut it and I am tired of them riding down on me as I ride hard. Roadie shorts, on the other hand, are not a problem.

Anyway, gotta' run. I have a picket line I need to join.......
For shorts I've had great success buying thin, breathable and stretchy outdoor/hiking shorts with belt loops, and wearing them over the top of good multi-panel roadie shorts. The outers I got from Costco for $15 a piece but you can find them almost anywhere. The roadie shorts I usually get from Aero Tech Designs, great US-made shorts whose best are usually 60 or 70 bucks. My third grade math tells me that is $75-85 per, and that is for outstanding quality stuff. These companies charging $180 for a simple lined breathable cargo short and calling it MTB shorts can go chug a bag, it's a ridiculous amount of money.
 

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Having handle bars with a varying backsweeps and rises is good for all riders regardless of fitness levels or age. It could provide a relatively inexpensive way to get a bike that is bespoke to the rider.

I find my hands can get numb after 40 minutes because of my body position. There’s no lingering soreness but I have to adjust my hands repeatedly during the course of a ride. Perhaps custom handle bars with a different geometry would ameliorate that.

Having handle bar choices that are as abundant and varied as saddles would be of benefit to many riders. A bike could be set up for comfort, speed, etc and those in between sizes would have less angst knowing their reach could be adjusted.
 

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I employed bar ends for over 25 years — finally gave them up this past spring due to the stigma.

I miss the way they work but don’t miss they way they look. Which is too bad because up until I gave them up I was kinda proud of the fact that I wasn’t a slave to fashion. I used the “L” shaped bar ends — not the huge ones, just L-shaped. I liked them so much that I had several pair of petite sized ones custom made. They made cruising the flats nice as I could drape the end of my fingers over the horizontal extension while the heels of my hands rested on the grip. And for climbing wicked steep pitches — whoa. Nuthin’ but awesome.

Why did I finally give them up? Well, bar ends work so well that I always assumed that they’d eventually make a triumphant return to general use. Figured I’d be regarded as a diehard genius for my bar end loyalty whenever that day eventually arrived. But no, I finally realized that was never going to happen, that I was just becoming a bar end weirdo.
=sParty
 
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