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That one can use to spray on a chain or a cassette? If so, will it coat it black and is it practical to use on components such as chains and cassettes that normally experience constant friction?
 

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djork said:
That one can use to spray on a chain or a cassette? If so, will it coat it black and is it practical to use on components such as chains and cassettes that normally experience constant friction?
"coat it black"

:confused:

No Teflon spray I have ever seen is black.
 

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djork said:
That one can use to spray on a chain or a cassette? If so, will it coat it black and is it practical to use on components such as chains and cassettes that normally experience constant friction?
I use this stuff to make my pedals more slippery without being as messy as oil or grease.

It is clear, not black.

You could probably use it on your drivetrain but it will probably wear off more quickly than chain lube.

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=124699-39963-D00100101&lpage=none
 

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To the OP. There's a difference between coated teflon parts and teflon sprays. I think what you're originally referring to is the coating process. There isn't a readily available commercial product that will let you do this. And actually, I think (don't feel like getting out my coatings book), it's a paint then bake on process.
 

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he's cooking now

Tri-flow is teflon based and turns black on your chain and cogs after about one ride....does that count? ;)

It sure sounds like this person wants the frying pan coating...but out of a can.

Nope....that won't happen. Its a pretty tricky process to get it to bond to the frying pans.

Tri-flow or Finish-line teflon sprays are your best bet. And don't confuse Teflon sprays with Silicone sprays, a suprisingly common problem. The silicone sprays seem to have MUCH less staying power.
 

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SuperTech Lubricant from WalMart is what I have right now, seems similar to TriFlow and a lot less expensive. Anyone know if it is silicone-based or Teflon-based? I can't seem to find an ingredients list on the can, except some warning that it contains petroleum distillates. TIA. -GT2005 :)
 

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Twisted Trail said:
Tri-flow is teflon based and turns black on your chain and cogs after about one ride....does that count? ;)
A lot of people say that about various lubes. The truth is that has teflon as an additive (and a small amount, at that). Tri-Flow is petroleum oil based with a little teflon added.

The only lube the ever was 100% pure teflon was from Dupont and it is no longer sold. It was in a tube and came out as a white paste. It was tough to get it into the chain innards. It really didn't work better than anything else and the chain still got dirty. I still have some and only use it now for lubing cables.
 

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MikeDee said:
A lot of people say that about various lubes. The truth is that has teflon as an additive (and a small amount, at that). Tri-Flow is petroleum oil based with a little teflon added.

The only lube the ever was 100% pure teflon was from Dupont and it is no longer sold. It was in a tube and came out as a white paste. It was tough to get it into the chain innards. It really didn't work better than anything else and the chain still got dirty. I still have some and only use it now for lubing cables.
Well of course the Teflon is only a minor additive. Once I actually bought an industrial lube that was JUST teflon in a very volatile carrier. It was crap.

There is more to life than just Teflon, and the other additives are very important for anti-corrosion and different loading conditions found in bicycles, which is why I GENERALLY gravitate to a lube that is specifically designed for bicycles and use something different on the heavily loaded chain versus lightly loaded pivot points.

regarding the Walmart lube mentioned, it probably does NOT have silicone OR teflon if its not prominently mentioned. That doesn't mean it isn't a good lube. Depends on the film and corrosion characteristics.
 
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