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I have been running Panaracer Super Tubes. They are heavy but I have had no flats whens my riding partner has had a couple. My concern is that the extra weight is hurting my performance in some way. I've been told that the wheel is the worst place to add weight.
What do you guys think would it be a noticable difference to switch back to regular tubes, or should I just stick with the Super Tubes?
Thanks for your opinions
Kent
 

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~Disc~Golf~
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yeah... rotational weight makes a big difference in acceleration.. once you have momentum going tho, that weight is gonna want to keep spinning. If you're doin' alot of climbing/sprinting a lower rotational weight will help out alot.
If you're worried about gettin snake-bites or bull thorn punctures that a thinner tube is prone to, you may want to take a look at goin' 'ghetto tubeless'. There are numerous threads on the subject.
Hopefully someone with more science (if that's what you want to hear) or experience with ghetto-tubeless will chime in.
FWIW, I get maybe one flat a year with thin tubes. Maybe I'm lucky or I pick good lines and unweight the bike properly...i don't know - just haven't had the need to go tubeless, but tons of people swear by it.
 

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I dig trails!
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highdelll said:
yeah... rotational weight makes a big difference in acceleration.. once you have momentum going tho, that weight is gonna want to keep spinning. If you're doin' alot of climbing/sprinting a lower rotational weight will help out alot.
[email protected] The first response is not supposed to be so accurate. ;)

To the OP, I have been able to run the super light tubes (non-latex) on my bikes without issue - that includes the AM/FR/whatever bike.

P
 

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Wait, what!?
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highdelll said:
had the need to go tubeless, but tons of people swear by it.
Guilty. I got tired of flatting thin tubes every ride, and I didnt want to run the heavy thorn proofs anymore, so I took the plunge with the Stans Kit. Since then, I have not had a single problem with my tires/air pressure on the trails. Arguably the best money I have spent on my bike, and I plan on upgrading from my DT 430s to a UST wheelset next.

Thats my opinion, or suggestion rather. To me, it was more then worth it!
 

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Agreed....

it depends on your situation. Lighter tubes can deffinately make a difference. The key is rotational weight. But ONLY the rotational weight on the outside of the wheel will really be noticeable to any great extent. Hubs and spokes usually aren't that noticeable except as they relate to overall weight. Rims, tires, and tubes are all usually quite noticeable. It depends of course on the difference in the weith. You likely won't notice a 40g difference in weight. But a 100g difference is usually detectable by most riders.

So the claimed weight on a 26x1.6-2.1 panaracer super tube is 230g, claimed weight on the 26x1.9-2.1 panny green lite is 100g. Would you notice that?, most likely. You'd be saving right around 1/4 pound per wheel with lighter tubes. But would it be worth it? That's hard to say. It depends on the type of flats that you are likely to get where you ride. Pinch flats are preventable for the most part, just find the right air pressure for your terrain and riding style. Puncture flats on the other hand are not quite so avoidable with tubed tires. Your only option for a tubed tire set up is heavier tires and/or tubes that resist punctures.

Now as for a tubeless set up it'll likely be a horse a piece when it comes to weight savings. Going with a Stans kit or gehtto tubeless it's pretty much a wash. When going tubeless your getting rid of the tube so - 230g. But you are adding back in the weight of the rim strip and sealant, about + 70 g on average. So once every thing is said and done you'd be saving about 160g (or about 1/3 of a pound) over your current tubed set up assuming you stick with your current tires. Certainly noticeable. However there are two big benefits to running tubeless, the virtual elimination of pinch flats (as long as you don't run stupid low pressures), and a huge reduction in puncture flats as the sealant will seal most punctures. There are draw backs though. More frequent maintenance to be exact. You have to check your tire pressure before EVERY ride, no sealant is perfect and they will drop pressure over time. And you do have to refresh or replace the sealant periodically. Set up, depending on the tires and the rims, can also be a bit problematic. So you get the benefits of puncture and pinch flat protection, and usually lighter weight where it matters at the rim.

Your choice of course, but yes lighter rotational weight does help and can show an significant increase in performance.

Good Dirt
 

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I agree with Squash. I went with Flyweight tubes to save weight - and did notice the rotational difference in feel. But I started to get some flats here and there. Then went to Panaracer Green Lite tubes and loved them - but again got some flats.

Finally went to Stans and rim strips and loved it. But it did take some work to set it up - and it does take maintenance. Not all riders are up to that kind of work.

All depends on what you want and are willing to work with.

But the bottom line is - yes - I feel the weigh difference over the 230g tubes I was using.
 

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Come on, dare me!
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Being kind of a weight weenie and running ultra light tubes in the past, I frequently pinch flatted, until the moment I got sick of it and went tubeless. From this day, I almost completely forgot flats, enjoy better all-around grip and lose weight in a crucial place -- the wheels.

As you may have guessed by now, I strongly recommend going tubeless. The new range of tubeless tires, like the 2Bliss series from Specialized, for example, are lighter and still strong, so, whatever your bike and riding style, you'll benefit from saying quits to tubes.
 

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I run latex tubes in all my off-road bikes, i hit less than one flat per year and that's usually a tyre ripper.

Same sort of pumping up every ride crap as Stans, but require no other maintenance, and they are virtually impossible to pinch flat.

Another option worth trying...
 
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