Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
wait a minute....
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am wondering if fork bob really affects forward momentum.I ride a 5spot and have used it with a minute one and a vanilla125r. The vanilla handles,rides,steers and soaks up everthing better than the minute.The only thing is that it does bob some.Since the rear tire is where the power goes to the ground, and all forward motion is from the rear, then why would a little bob in the front affect forward momentum? I cant feel a difference on mine. Does anyone know any different?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,131 Posts
Not as much as some people like to claim, like if you have a 25lb FS bike vs a 35lb trai/freeride bike. Sure, with good technology that 35lb bike may "pedal well", but due to the increase in mass it's still going to wear you out faster and be more of a b*tch to lug around all day, especially on an epic ride. If you've ridden behind many XC bikes, you'll notice that quite a few of them bob, but when a bike is lighter it simply doesn't matter as much...

I think the more travel you have the more important it is to "control bob", but even when it is controlled it's not like a heavier bike is magically going to be easier/faster than something significantly lighter...
 

·
The Ancient One
Joined
·
1,573 Posts
SIGMA said:
I am wondering if fork bob really affects forward momentum.I ride a 5spot and have used it with a minute one and a vanilla125r. The vanilla handles,rides,steers and soaks up everthing better than the minute.The only thing is that it does bob some.Since the rear tire is where the power goes to the ground, and all forward motion is from the rear, then why would a little bob in the front affect forward momentum? I cant feel a difference on mine. Does anyone know any different?
Neither fork bob nor bob in the rear, when, like fork bob, it is caused only by rider weight shift, will slow you down or sap energy. What they do is limit your ability to accelerate your pedal cadence.

If you pedal out of the saddle with a fork that has a lockout and you maintain a constant cadence, you won't work any harder with the lockout on or off.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,131 Posts
Steve from JH said:
Neither fork bob nor bob in the rear, when, like fork bob, it is caused only by rider weight shift, will slow you down or sap energy. What they do is limit your ability to accelerate your pedal cadence.
.
Isn't pedaling a constant accelleration? There's no such thing as a smooth pedal cadence, and you are effectively accellerating a bike "constantly" for the most part...
 

·
The Ancient One
Joined
·
1,573 Posts
Jm. said:
Isn't pedaling a constant accelleration? There's no such thing as a smooth pedal cadence, and you are effectively accellerating a bike "constantly" for the most part...
You're correct that the bike is always accelerating or decelerating when being pedaled. But I said "constant cadence". That means the same number of pedal strokes per minute.

When you use the movement of your body mass to help pedal, you have to push off against the rebound. That means that to some extent your cadence is enslaved to the resonance of the spring. You can't just jack up the frequency at will. That's why racers can't stand bobbing.
 

·
The Ancient One
Joined
·
1,573 Posts
gonzostrike said:
the frequency with which one worries about "Bob" is directly related to one's inability to ride a bike with finesse, grace and skill.
I agree but I don't think the level of skill required is all that high. It comes naturally like bouncing on a trampoline. You don't try to push off while you're still going down. It's more a matter of mentally just going with the flow (or bob) and stopping complaining.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top