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Another festivus MIRACLE!
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I have an 06 Specialized Enduro Expert that comes with a Blackspire chain tensioner. I was riding thru some serious rocky stuff, and bashed the chain tensioner into my back tire. After removing it for the rest of the ride, I really didn't notice that much of a difference. I put the guide back on and bent it back into shape, and still ride with it, but the question is - is it really necessary? It still isn't right, and I feel like taking the damn thing off.

I know the best part of having a chain guide is to keep it from falling off the cranks of DH stuff, but what if you are rippin' XC, small drops and occasional jumps?

Just wondering....
 

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I run an e13 sts on my all mountain rig for the reasons you've listed. I tried for a time to do without a guide, but in the end it was the better solution. The new e13 lg-1may be a good option for you if you're not wanting extra weight, only 195 grams for something that's going to keep the chain on there without fail.
 

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ride hard take risks
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I run a 2 ring + bash without a tensioner. Bounced off alot of rocks, ruts, roots, crashed never droped the chain 1 year in this bike. My old SC Supa8 that i sold is still running 2 rings + bash 3 years old. Alot of people have tryed to tell me if i dont run a guide i will loose my chain, hummm o'well :D
 

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I have an 06 Enduro Elite and I've been riding mine without the chainguide for a few days now. For me, it was just cause the Blackspire is feaking noisey IMO. So far it's been fine without it on the same type of terrain you're talking about. As soon as I get some cash though, I plan on replacing it with an E-13 DRS, as I hear those are really quiet and obviously get a lot of props here.

Neccesary no, but I like the peace of mind.
 

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I just got another bike yesterday and i'm trying to run a Two chainring sistem ussing a 42 big ring and a 28 for the granny.



oviuslly is a lot of problems about,,
*the teeth diference is far to much (14T)

*I'm ussing Downhill chainrings with out any kind of ranp, pin and they also have really Tall Teeth.

*the bike is a Balfa 2-step HD that features a VPP link, , is a great suspension sistem but it have but it have one short coming, the whole rear sub frame moves Upwards and end up hitting the derreileur, so far i'm trying to figure out a good soltution

I'm running the best chain guide the money can buy, a E-13 DRS design for a two chainring dutty and so far a modified (Hack to pieces so it does not hit the swingarm) seat tube derreileur.


so far is working just fine but the solution on the derreileur problem is a little chessy, the chain guide is magnificent,, well a little heavy but also really strong


Here is the whole bike, is a 7" travel bike but i still want to be able to climp some hills from time to time , so i like to get this two chainring sistem going..


in your case E-13 also makes a DRS with a back plate compatible with a E-type derreileur, so you don't even require to have a seat tube to hold the dereileur on,, keep in mind this guides are not made to run a 42T chainring, i think the maximum amount recomended is 38T

you can also run just the Lexan bash plate with out the guide if you just want to protect the chainring, but for that is a bunch of other options,,]

here are some fotos of my tandem ussing E-13 bash guards and a multi chainring bash guard too..


as you can see i'm ruuning 3 rings,(54-44-24) and still works just fine




this poor thing hits rocks all the time
since a Tandem is pretty much impossible to lift when you need to avoid a obstacle.


I hope this helps...
 

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I run the DRS on my weyless and that thing rocks like a fox!!! well only ben running sence Xmass so I dont have allot of miles on it, just my local jumps and back yard but looks like its going to be great1!!!1!!1 I dont know why more people dont run them or why they dont come stock on bikes??
 

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bullit71 said:
I know the best part of having a chain guide is to keep it from falling off the cranks of DH stuff, but what if you are rippin' XC, small drops and occasional jumps?

Just wondering....
I guess it depends on whether you have a "problem" or not. Me? Yeah I did on my jami XLT. With the chain length right for full compression, it was too sloppy @ typical ride height for the derailuer to deal with. Hence lot's of slap and bouncing off the rings.

I didn't (& don't) think just 2 f. rings were enough for an "all day" excursion bike, so I got a Heim 3-ring. Very happy. Havn't dropped a chain since & I've still got a big ring to use. I can keep the power on later, and get on it sooner on any DH section than people with 2-ring systems, & just plain flat drop them on any flat section (they're twiddling about on a 34t & I'm hammering on a 46t) 3-rings - The only way to go for an AM bike IMO.
 

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noMAD man
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I just did an experiment.

I just installed a Hone crankset on this Bullit pictured. I had an MRP-LRP 2-ring setup on this bike before. I ran this bike with and without the lower roller and arm to see how the difference was. I figured if it wasn't noticeable, I'd save the weight and friction. I ran the roller arm at the absolute least angle to lessen chain friction for optimum efficiency.

The difference was very noticeable. We have quite a few technical rock gardens at our local trail with some small jumps and drops built into it. Without the arm/roller the chain would try to drop to the BB and it even flails around enough to change on the rear cassette. With the arm/roller in place, those bad characteristics are just about all eliminated. There is no chain/BB dropping and the cassette/chain changing is an extreme rarity. I was also surprised that the pedaling efficiency wasn't noticeably affected with the roller in place, with the arm/roller set relatively low. If you set them up high at the extreme end, friction increases a bit.

The test between the "with and without" setups have caused me to go ahead and order an E-13 Supercharger bash guard to swap with my big ring. The MRP-LRP setup that I had for a Race Face crankset had a 5-bolt bash guard, and I'll need the 104/4-bolt bash guard, as I hardly ever use the big ring. That arm and roller does a lot to maintain chain control IMHO at almost no cost to pedaling efficiency and with very little weight. I think it's important to get the most efficient roller setup so that you get adjustability and smooth chain travel over the roller. Too much friction will be noticeable.
 

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truth seeker
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You may not need a chain guide most of the time, but

the day you need it, you will be very sorry you don't have it. I rarely drop the chain on my XC rig, but when it happens, it always seems to be at the worst possible time - e.g., middle of a technical rock garden, approaching a drop, etc. I am finally planning to order a guide for my XC rig (I run e13 guides on my other bikes) but should have done it when I bought the bike.

Here's another instructive story from my own experience: I recently offered to sell an e13 DRS guide to a friend who rides a Banshee Chaparral. He offered up all the usual excuses: don't need it, not worth the money, loss of pedalling efficiency, blah blah blah. Less than a week later, he dropped his chain bombing down a local trail. The chain broke, got tangled up in his spokes and rear derailleur, ripped out several spokes, and sheared off the derailleur hanger. Luckily, he lived to tell the tale (and to have his friendly LBS install a DRS guide along with new spokes and a new derailleur hanger). :)

The cost of a chain guide is a small price to pay for the security and peace of mind it provides...
 

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Portland, OR
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I use my P.2 for somewhat all mountain duties. I took the truvativ boxguide off for a day, and I dropped my chain twice. so i'm running the truvativ boxguide ...its noisy as hell, but it works.
 

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N* Bomber Crew
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I own two bikes, but in reality only ride one. My 67 has a e13 DRS on it. I sometimes ride uphill or trail ride, and it works wonders. Going downhill...its simply the best. Its shiftable as well. The E13 DRS simply owns.
 

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Descalzo said:
I guess it depends on whether you have a "problem" or not. Me? Yeah I did on my jami XLT. With the chain length right for full compression, it was too sloppy @ typical ride height for the derailuer to deal with. Hence lot's of slap and bouncing off the rings.

I didn't (& don't) think just 2 f. rings were enough for an "all day" excursion bike, so I got a Heim 3-ring. Very happy. Havn't dropped a chain since & I've still got a big ring to use. I can keep the power on later, and get on it sooner on any DH section than people with 2-ring systems, & just plain flat drop them on any flat section (they're twiddling about on a 34t & I'm hammering on a 46t) 3-rings - The only way to go for an AM bike IMO.
thanks...this is a better approach for my all mountain bike...order up the heim 3 yesterday...a 2 ring bike is focused more for DH probably...i'll keep 3 rings so i can go anywhere.

descalzo is totally right, going DH with three rings mean you can start pedalling sooner and at higher speeds

now, why don't they design a new crank designed for 3 chainrings and a bashguard...and then an e13 designed for three rings
 
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