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Just wondering. Been feeling a little burnt out myself here lately. Like this weekend, I want to go riding, but going to the beach instead. Also, I typically like to get a ride or two in during the week, but haven't been doing that for the last couple weeks. Been kinda like "eh, whatever" mode I'm hoping it's temperory. Anyone else ever feel like that? :confused:
 

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It's not what you think.
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Currently in that mode...

I try to find the motivation but it eludes me here lately which is a bummer since I just bought a new bike and have only ridden it 3 times now. I've been mtn biking for 15 years and every once in a while I loose my "passion" for a few months then it fires back up. Of couse, we ride year-round here so 4 days a week, 52 weeks a year adds up...plus it's just plain ol' hot out right now. Take some time off and don't feel guilty, the fire will return. Try something else for a while, I just bought some *gasp* golf clubs (titanium of course).

Also, if you have a chance try some trail maintenance with the local club or ride with new people.
 

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Sure. Burn Out is normal for anything

It is difficult to keep up an intense level of committment for anything. When I get burned out of biking, I surf or play guitar. Come winter I put away the bikes and board and ski so that gives me a break. There was a time when I played my guitars a couple of hours a day, now I'm lucky to get in a couple of hours per month. Burn out!

Surfing is my latest intense activity. New board and all has brought back the love I've always had for the sport but for the past few years, I hardly surfed at all. I was burned out.

Come late April I'm burned out on skiing and can't wait to ride.

You have to keep mixing things up. At least I do.
 

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Fart smeller
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Hell, yeah!

crashedandburned said:
Just wondering. Been feeling a little burnt out myself here lately. Like this weekend, I want to go riding, but going to the beach instead. Also, I typically like to get a ride or two in during the week, but haven't been doing that for the last couple weeks. Been kinda like "eh, whatever" mode I'm hoping it's temperory. Anyone else ever feel like that? :confused:
In the midst of a huge burn session myself. Downieville perked me back up (how could it not?), but I've had the mtb blahs for quite a while. I think part of my problem (among many) is that my bikes are too damn complicated, and keep requiring too much thought to keep them operational. (Oh, crap- the rear shock's losing air again. What's wrong with my fork now??). Also, the immense amount of driving to trailheads is another bummer. Someday, in the near future, I'd like to do a ride that lasts longer than the drive did. :rolleyes: Maybe it'll happen in my lifetime.

I'm hoping a new SS will help, but I'm not consoled by the fact I won't be commuting on it. *sigh* Just another brick in the wall.

Like you, I'm hoping it's a temporary case of the blahs. If it's not, I'm in a shload of trouble. I've got too much invested in this sport to try another... How much would a pair of jogging shoes cost?

fp

Hmmmm. Maybe I'll hook up the BOB trailer to the SS for commuting, and fill it with rocks. That'll solve the spinning-out part... bet my knees would love it!
 

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Technology can burn you out at times....

I guess that is why I keep coming back to my hardtail with the vee brakes. Not much to worry about. Just get on and ride. Change a flat now and than, replace a brake pad, true a wheel, but nothing really pressing. I've been lucky that my SID does not seem to ever need attention. Rigid would be simplier still but I do like that suspension in front.

The road bike is even less complicated.

The FS is fun but you do have to keep up with the shock and the disc get out of line occassionally and all those pivots need to be lubed.

For some people the maintenance is all part of the fun.

Surfboards are sooooo simple. Wax 'em and ride. That's it!
 

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Yes, recently...

I didn't have any problems with burn out for years when I had a bunch of riding buddies and at my last job (U.S. Air Force). But now with my new job, time only lets me ride by myself since coordinating rides is so tough. It was OK for a few years. Then it snuck up on me. I rode more road for a while then went back to dirt. I still love wrenching on my bikes and still "up grade" every so often but I do take days off now to do something else.

I went for a week to California (from baltimore) and rode Downieville with my buds. That helped for a bit but now I'm back.

Hope I can get out of my rut. 20 yrs of riding and finally burn out. Not a bad run I guess.

Enjoy!
 

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Pull my finger
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I think I've ridden offroad two, or maybe three, times this year. Only two rides on the road just to keep my legs from shrivelling away, too. When I changed my cleats off my winter shoes back in the spring, I realised I'd only ridden twice since I changed them over from my summer shoes at the end of last fall. That just sucks, but I couldn't find the motivation to get out and ride any more than that.

But, like Rev, I bought a new board recently and have been focused on that more, and swimming three nights a week to stay in shape for surfing at the weekends.

I did manage to get out on a ride last weekend with that reprobate Stick and his better half, and actually managed to clear a climb that has always eluded me, so it's not all bad. It kind of rekindled my interest in riding.


Sidenote to Rev - what board did you get?
 

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Dick Brewer Nose Rider @ 9'6"

I was telling my wife that it took me 40 years to get the right board but this one really works the way I want it to.

Oh, so stable, but still turns quick enough. Almost impossible not to catch anything with it. Came real close to getting some toes over the nose last week before the shore reared its ugly head and I had to back off. I could never do that on any of the smaller boards I owned in the past.
 

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Pull my finger
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Rev Bubba said:
I was telling my wife that it took me 40 years to get the right board but this one really works the way I want it to.

Oh, so stable, but still turns quick enough. Almost impossible not to catch anything with it. Came real close to getting some toes over the nose last week before the shore reared its ugly head and I had to back off. I could never do that on any of the smaller boards I owned in the past.
Nice board!

My "new" one is a Spectrum Noserider, 9'0, with a cool (IMO) flared triple stringer setup. I got it used, but it's in near-mint condition. The first time I used it I split the session between that and my 6'8", and the difference in paddling speed and the ability to catch waves was incredible.
 

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Shop I deal w/ caters to "older" surfers

Eastern Lines in Lavallette has a big selection of long boards. I looked at quite a few before deciding on the Brewer. Not a bad price. I think the total with tax was about $700. Hey, they have also put some color back into the boards. My has a dark blue bottom and rails with a bright white deck and gold lettering. Single stringer and fin.

The board I just got rid of was a 9'10" "gun" and turned far too quickly. Soon as you tried to get up it squirted off in some other direction. A real pain to ride in small surf. The new board reminds me of my buddies (Retro Fred) old Hansen. It is great fun to ride but being that it is an original custom from the sixties, putting a leash on it would kill the value.

I rode an 8' Con Aussie for years but never warmed up to it like the long boards I rode from '63 - '68.
 

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surly inbred
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My issue is trail burnout..

Finch Platte said:
Also, the immense amount of driving to trailheads is another bummer. Someday, in the near future, I'd like to do a ride that lasts longer than the drive did. :rolleyes:
Same here!

Lately I just don't have the time nor gas $ to do the 40 or 60 mile commute for quality trails very often; so I get pretty bored with the same local (less than challenging) spots. Luckily, my fuel is currently being fired from wanting to build up the endurance after quitting smoking.

as they say ...this too, shall pass

~mud
 

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not me

I ride almost every day, except for a total recovery day after some huge backcountry epic. One way to keep fresh and interested, that has worked for me for decades, is to have a lot of different bikes.
Sick of singletracking on your f/s bike? Ride a full rigid, it's a totally different experience.
Or ride singeltrack on a cross bike for a greater challenge.
Or a fixed gear.
Or a singlespeed.
Or, if there's lots of Texass tourists in town, ride some singletrack on a full-on road bike with fat sewups, just to freak them out.
Can't face the singletrack? Ride the road on a road bike. Or a fixed gear.
When I don't feel like riding, I usually take out my fixed gear scorcher and cruise around town, we have a killer bike path.
Of course there are days when your body demands total rest; on those days, rest.
But when you're just psychologically burnt out on riding, riding a totally different kind of bike is the way to maintain interest.
And for those who always ride their singletrack loops in the same direction -- go the other way, makes a different ride. But that's stating the obvious.
And of course there's always a road trip to new singletrack.
 

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34N 118W
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Newsflash!

bulC advocates DRIVING! ;)

bulC said:
And of course there's always a road trip to new singletrack.
If you still have that POS Goodwill bike mentioned in your profile, convert that mofo to a fixed gear and you'll have miles of smiles again my friend. Great fun.

I took an '84 Trek and gave it the business. Now if I can't get out to the trails, I can hop on the fixie and commute, cruise the MUT or do some rush-hour derby. Meanwhile my geared De Rosa stands in the corner, like me at a Jr. High dance; unseen, unwanted, unloved. *sniff*

Welp, off to therapy. Chin up and try something new! (like a good anti-depressant and a martini).

HW
 

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this bodes well for crowded trails

I think part of my problem (among many) is that my bikes are too damn complicated, and keep requiring too much thought to keep them operational. (Oh, crap- the rear shock's losing air again. What's wrong with my fork now??).

Finally, a silver lining in the rampant over-technologicalfication (if Herr Bush can make up words, so can I. It's a free country. Oh wait, that's wrong....Anyway...) of bicycle hardware. If current trends continue, everybody will be sitting home whining their 14-sp. cogsets (which shitmano has already patented) won't shift, their 12-inch travel forks and frames are too complicated to tune, their tubeless tires are losing air, and their 8-spoke wheels are too wobbly to ride. Then I'll have the trails to myself like in the old days, and can ride my full rigid bikes in peace without the threat of getting run over by snotnose idiots on motorless motorcycles.
 

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none of my bikes are a POS

Hollywood said:
bulC advocates DRIVING! ;)

If you still have that POS Goodwill bike mentioned in your profile, convert that mofo to a fixed gear and you'll have miles of smiles again my friend. Great fun.

I hope you don't equate the age of a bike with lack of quality. Don't know what bike you refer to as a POS. I have some pretty old bikes. My newest MTB's frame was built in '92. My towner SS and a road fixed gear both have frames built in '74. All my bikes are mechanically dialed to perfection, and no one who really knows and loves bicycles would refer to any of them as a POS. Maybe you can get a job with Bicycling or Mountain Bike magazines. You'd fit right in, their editors also give short shrift to any bicycle lacking mega travel and the latest marketing driven gizmos. Like you, they lack any sense of cycling history.
Thanks for the tip on fixed gear fun. I already have four: A pure go-fast road bike ('74 Viscount - ask your Dad); a Schwinn road with cross fatties and fenders for the winter; a steel-frame MTB; and a Scorcher.
 

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oops

easy there soldier, I was replying to the original post from Crashedandburned. My bad for putting it under your message.

bulC said:
I hope you don't equate the age of a bike with lack of quality. Don't know what bike you refer to as a POS.
bulC said:
Like you, they lack any sense of cycling history.
ok that one hurt dammit. Don't make me come up to Durango and put a bag of flaming poo on your doorstep (or on that piece of scrap carpet outside your van).

xoxo,
HW
 

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Yes, yes, yes.

Burnout is common. And it doesn't have to be extreme like you don't want to ride for 2 months. Burnout can be:
- you don't want to train and can't ride as fast as you normally do
- are very easily tempted by other things instead of riding.

My solutions are:
- buy, buy, buy. Nothing cures the burnout blues like a shiny new bike or bike part.

- variety, variety... Different kinds of riding keeps you hungry for more. My current rides are:
singlespeed rigid bike, singlespeed race, freeride bike, road bike.

francois
 
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