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Hmmm, or maybe it’s my manbun.
That would probably do it.
Wearing patchouli and eyeliner probably doesn't help either.
Any one of those things on their own and you would probably get a pass...
combine it with a trail bell and your fate is sealed.
 

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Nothing gets hikers and slower bikers attention like my Spurcycle Compact Bell. It's loud, piercing, and rings for a while. I'll ring it waaay back and that's usually enough for people to notice and I don't have to slow down much to pass.

I have i9 1/1 hubs that are nice and loud, but people still seem oblivious. I can also call out when I'm coming, but maybe my voice just doesn't carry cause people rarely notice until I'm right beside them...the Spurcycle bell does the trick though.

Also to echo some comments, people often thank me for ringing the bell in advance...

As far as being manly, it's a tiny black bell that barely stands out on handlebars...what's the big deal
 

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You people and your silly bells...

I have never needed one.
between the beats dropping from my Bluetooth speaker, holding obnoxiously loud phone conversations with my broker, shouting the occasional “Strava” for the bike path segment, and freespinning My 720 POE hub... the hikers scatter like the roaches they are. For the die hard ones who don’t move out of principle, a quick hit of the air horn does the trick. Pro tip, alway say “on your left” and take them on the right, works 93% of the time.
 

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I used my bell on a hiker walker towards me yesterday. He was a geezer and his head was down the whole time, he did appreciate the bell versus just rolling up on him.
 

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change is good
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A hiker lectured me about using a bell because he said it would be convenient for him. I was a smart ass and I don’t regret it. I do always yield for hikers and equestrians. BTW, when a biker surprised me when hiking, I didn’t wet my pants.


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The older you get the more you lose your ability to hear high frequency sounds (like some bells). I bet a lot of us on this forum can’t hear sounds that teenagers can. Therefore, sometimes a bell is ineffective. Considering that a lot of hikers are older, perhaps a bell isn’t the best way to catch their attention?

I rolled up on an old lady recently while dinging my bell. She didn’t even notice. I dinged it firmly and repeatedly just to see if she’d hear it. She didn’t react. I finally just said “hello” and she bolted upright.

 

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The older you get the more you lose your ability to hear high frequency sounds (like some bells). I bet a lot of us on this forum can’t hear sounds that teenagers can. Therefore, sometimes a bell is ineffective. Considering that a lot of hikers are older, perhaps a bell isn’t the best way to catch their attention?

I rolled up on an old lady recently while dinging my bell. She didn’t even notice. I dinged it firmly and repeatedly just to see if she’d hear it. She didn’t react. I finally just said “hello” and she bolted upright.

Last year, I came up behind an elderly woman
and used my bell. No reaction, so then said something, and startled her.
Later, on a 2nd loop, came up behind her again quickly and not realizing it was her. So again rang the bell, no reaction. Said something, and
startled her again, this time so bad she about fell down. I felt bad and apologized and explained I had used my bell both times trying to gently alert her. She said that she’d heard the bell both times, but it sounded like it was coming from in front of her, she didn’t see anything, so paid no attention.
I wanted to ask why she didn’t look around when she heard the bell, but didn’t.
 

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I like having a bell, used to alert others. I have seen people react poorly to runners.
People’s reaction to it are mostly good.
Some people have goofy reactions to being alerted to the presence of a bike. So far none has jumped into my path like they might do on a verbal callout.
Big picture....If another person is on a multi-use path or trail and are oblivious to anyone but themselves, or their hearing impairment, (I have experienced this a few times), they own that risk.
Hope if they can’t hear, they don’t drive a vehicle.
 

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I had a cyclist yesterday hit a siren to let me know he was passing on the left. I found it un-necessary and full of douche-baggery as I was walking on the right and he had a WIDE OPEN clear path around me on the left already. But, I am sure he has fun with his kids siren...
 

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You people and your silly bells...

I have never needed one.
between the beats dropping from my Bluetooth speaker, holding obnoxiously loud phone conversations with my broker, shouting the occasional “Strava” for the bike path segment, and freespinning My 720 POE hub... the hikers scatter like the roaches they are. For the die hard ones who don’t move out of principle, a quick hit of the air horn does the trick. Pro tip, alway say “on your left” and take them on the right, works 93% of the time.
Everyone knows 72% of statistics are made up.
;)

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Deaf people are statistically safer drivers than those who can hear.
I agree-if that condition of hearing loss is one which a person has no other choice and uses other means to be situationally aware. Not one as in my father-in-law refusing to acknowledge his hearing decline.
Total hearing loss is indeed a situation which indeed afflicts some. In my case, a great friend of mine.
 

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Here are photos of the Timber bell. The cone is facing front, so I don't think it's doing wonders for aero. 🤣



With the cone facing forward it makes the perfect bug catcher. It may come in handy some day if you get lost and run out of food.
 

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Just like most places, my local trails are commonly populated with hikers. Even when I announce myself "COMING UP BEHIND YOU!!" it seems that they are not aware of me. The other day on a very wide open section of trail there was a group of 8 people hiking and walking a couple of dogs off leash, I announced myself and nobody could hear me over their banter. I basically had to come to a crawl and get right up behind them and yell. They were all so surprised.

I was going to order the timber bell, but they seem to be out of stock everywhere. I found the Spur cycle Bell. Spurcycle Original Bell

This looks like a quality product, and it seems (hopefully) rather noticeable on an otherwise quiet trail. I should have it in a few days and look forward to trying it out.

Who else here uses a bell when they ride? What has your experience been?
For climbing I use a cheap little "gling gling" bell on the handlebar. Some prefer the constant "bear" bell but I find them annoying. For downhills, my SRAM PG-1230 cassette makes enough noise to warn anyone. <ggg>
 
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