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Hellow all!

After 3 years on a TREK 4300 DISC I've decided to buy a full sus bike. This time I wanna buy a solid do-it-all-bike that can handle rough & gnar terrain and serve me for the next years.

After checking a few bikes I consider buying a new 2011 TREK Remedy 7. I went to TREK's local dealer where I saw the R7 and really loved it.

Lately I've been digging lots of MTB sites, trying to find R7 bike test, but didn't find any.
Does anyone own a 2011 TREK R7 or been riding one?

If anyone does, please try and help me out with these questions:

1. The R7 has a fixed 150mm Fox 32 float. Is there anyone familiar with this fork?
Is this 150mm non-adjustable fork makes it very difficult climbing ascents, or is it just makes it a little harder only on steep ascents?

2. Sometimes I'm going out with friends for long XC rides (half a day, about 20-30 miles) on plane terrains with no special gnar/technical obstacles. Is the R7 capable of long XC riding? Can I take the R7 for a half/full day out there and still feel happy and comfortable with it?

3. I'm 180 Lbs and therefore need (and like) a real solid do-it-all-bike. for my needs and riding style I don't need any high-end expensive bike & components, and pretty much like a bike I'd be happy and fun with right "out-of-the-box"
Do you think the Remedy 7 could be the right choice for me?

THANKS!
 

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It sounds like a good choice to me. I ride an Ellsworth Epiphany with has a 140mm fork and 5.25" of rear travel. I ride that bike for XC races, adventure race, and everything else. I think you will be just fine with your choice.

I say try not to get too caught up in all the numbers, I tend to drive myself crazy that way, and in the end when out on the trail most of the numbers are useless.

Do your research on it, if its the one you want, get it and ride the piss out of it.

Enjoy.
 

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meow meow
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i can climb fine with a 160mm 55, but really its not about the travel but the geo that will affect climbing.
 

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I think the remedy range is probably one of the better "do-it-all" bikes out there, really does motor along the flats and up climbs pretty well. Has enough forgiveness to let you try some things outside your current skill set and get away with it.
All bikes are a compromise, but the remedy is pretty much bang in the middle of the extremes of xc and dh. It is a bike that locks you into one type of rear shock so I wouldn't recommend it to someone who is obsessed about continually upgrading - but this doesn't really sound like you. Just remember that you will be faster on a flat easy ride with a smaller bike, faster on a steep rough ride with more bike!
Saying that this bike could win a world cup dh in the 90's!
Yes you could look at other manufacturers that produce similar styles of bike but if the trek comes from a local dealer you are happy with - that will outweigh any slight advantage from choosing any of the other designs (and they will only offer an advantage in one or two areas to lose out elsewhere).
My only final point would be to suggest you ride a fuel before you decide - they are an enormously capable bike for 120mm of travel - most of the time the fastest "do-it-all" bike is the LEAST bike you can get away with. Does speed (keeping up/beating your mates) or pushing your abilities in the rough interest you more?
 

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T.W.O.
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8,168 Posts
Rear shock is almost the last thing people upgrade, they'd send to Pushed before getting new ones. People don't do it on other bikes either. Some bikes now has custom tune valve for their design. Trek DCRV is great and I think you can just Pushed it to boost performance to your liking.
 

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A 6in bike is definitely the best do-it-all sized bike. Something like a Stumpjumper EVO would also be a good choice.

On my Enduro I have ridden 30+ miles in a single afternoon with over 4,000ft elevation gain. That bike weighs 30lbs and has a lot of nice components on it including a Talas 160mm. For steep and/or technical climbs I do lower the fork if I have time, even dropping it down to 130mm makes a huge difference. At 100mm it feels impossible to lift the front end while climbing.

If I wanted my Enduro to be a better all around bike I'd have 2 wheelsets, one for XC and one AM use. I run 819's and they are pretty stinkin solid rims, but I could easily drop 1.5lbs with lighter wheels and tires which would be huge!

The R 7 is a good choice, and like another member posted if you are happy with that shop that sells Trek then go for it. Having the support of your LBS is worth so much.
 
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