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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1996 Trek 8500 frame that's not broken or anything, the paint is chipped like crazy (i really mean crazy) of course. I'm 6'2" 185 lbs. If I pull the headtube and seatpost with my hands while pushing the pedal/crank sideways I can feel it flex, but I'm sure thats probably normal, as it's not how the bike is designed to take load anyway right? If I'm not bothered much by the bike's looks, so in all you guys' experience would I gain any real performance by getting a frame that doesn't have thousands of miles on it? I'd like to say "if it ain't broke don't fix it," but maybe I'm missing out and I just don't know it.

I almost forgot to mention that in '96, 8500's had rigid-fork geometry too and no rear disc tabs :thumbsup: while it has a (disc only) Reba on it now.
 

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Not really sure what you're doing by your description, but I don't think a new frame alone is going to improve your perfomance unless it's dramatically geometrically different. If you're not bothered by the bike keep it. Otherwise, get a new bike IMHO.
 

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Mutantclover said:
I have a 1996 Trek 8500 frame that's not broken or anything, the paint is chipped like crazy (i really mean crazy) of course. I'm 6'2" 185 lbs. If I pull the headtube and seatpost with my hands while pushing the pedal/crank sideways I can feel it flex, but I'm sure thats probably normal, as it's not how the bike is designed to take load anyway right? If I'm not bothered much by the bike's looks, so in all you guys' experience would I gain any real performance by getting a frame that doesn't have thousands of miles on it? I'd like to say "if it ain't broke don't fix it," but maybe I'm missing out and I just don't know it.

I almost forgot to mention that in '96, 8500's had rigid-fork geometry too and no rear disc tabs :thumbsup: while it has a (disc only) Reba on it now.
Are you able to make the chain rub on the front derailleur while doing standing sprint? Is the kind of flex you are simulating by holding the frame with both hands and pushing the bottom bracket with your foot?

10 years is a long time and technology marches on. I read somewhere I can't recall now, aluminum has the shortest fatigue life amongst the other materials. If it has been ridden hard, I would say get a new frame.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't have a front derailer since its a singlespeed. The whole thing is different than the original bike, just has that frame, so I'd be changing that and rebuilding if anything at this point (not whole new bike). The frame has a lot of use, like I haven't seen anything with even 20% as much missing paint. I can make it flex while standing on the bike, yes, although I have to push pretty hard to make it visible from the overhead point of view. I would suppose a Moto-Rapido, like I have my eye on, would be a bit better all around, but I think I ought to keep it at least until I become a better biker worthy of something flashy. Thanks for your responses!
 
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