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Two of the bikes I'm currently looking at offer their frames in chromoly and Ti. I was initially set on a Ti frame but the more I think about it I keep asking myself is it worth paying 3x the cost on a frame. Aside from saving 2lbs. is there a huge benefit to a Ti frame. I tell myself I could put the $ into a higher end build but then I go right back to wanting that Ti frame.
Can you help talk me out of it or why I should just go for it.
I'm not a racer and there's not much in the way of climbing where that weight saving would matter.Something about that Ti frame though. Talk some sense into me please.

For reference the bikes are a Stanton Switch9er and a RSD MC.
 

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No known cure
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I've had Ti frames and like the ride of steel a lot more. In fact I sold the last Ti frame to finance a custom steel frame. My 2cents.
 

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Design, design, design. Of the types you're talking about, you could have one model and the Ti version will be more compliant and ride more velvety. Another model, the Ti version will ride stiffer and feel quicker while the steel version will feel more compliant and muted. Without being able to ride each, its a crapshoot and you could probably make up the feel difference in tires/pressures/handlebars.

Me? Got one Ti and one steel. The one indisputable Ti advantage is that it cleans up with a Scotch Brite pad, and there is no concern of rust, abrasion, paint chips or oxidation. Either choice you make will be a good one.
 

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high pivot witchcraft
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My buddy, who is 165 pounds soaking wet and who rides very light on his bike, snapped the seat stay on his new this year Seven Mobius SL.
Tire Wheel Bicycle Bicycle wheel Crankset

I would be leery of Ti. I have heard of too many horror stories about issues at the welds.

Ended his season early. He has almost $20k sunk into that bike.

I’d go for steel.

But then again, I have 3 steel bikes in my garage that I worship - a Honzo, a Unit and a Paddy Wagon. I have more bikes than I want to admit. If I could keep only one. It would not be my Druid. Or my e-bike. It would be my beloved steel Honzo
Tire Wheel Bicycle Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Crankset
 

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Just before the turn of the century I wanted a ti frame in the worst way.
I thought, "It won't rust, offers a supple ride, doesn't have to be painted (in fact ti looks best unpainted) -- it'll be the last frame I ever buy."

So glad I never bought one.

I think of all the changes that mountain bikes have gone through since then...
  • Disc brakes
  • Tapered head tubes
  • Boost spacing
  • Major geo changes
  • Ti is typically hardtail only
It would not have been the last frame I ever bought.
I now ride FS bikes exclusively. Ones with modern geo.

I'm not saying don't do it, I'm just suggesting you consider how you'll feel in a few years.
Maybe you only buy one bike every 10-15 years or so (whereas I don't.)
I average a new bike each year.
But if it fits your master plan, ti is absolutely still a cool metal -- maybe the coolest.
=sParty
 

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That Mobius is not a good look. If it were mine, I'd get warranty replacement and sell it straight away.

That said, OP don't let the above post sway you one way or the other. Hardtail design is an entirely different ball game and titanium lends itself well to double-diamond hardtail bike frames, but not necessarily anything else. The ones you're looking at are probably made by ORA in Taiwan, which are Ti wizards and make a frame of excellent quality. Yes, Ti can break, and so can everything else including steel.
 

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high pivot witchcraft
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That Mobius is not a good look. If it were mine, I'd get warranty replacement and sell it straight away.

That said, OP don't let the above post sway you one way or the other. Hardtail design is an entirely different ball game and titanium lends itself well to double-diamond hardtail bike frames, but not necessarily anything else. The ones you're looking at are probably made by ORA in Taiwan, which are Ti wizards and make a frame of excellent quality. Yes, Ti can break, and so can everything else including steel.
Don’t disagree. Another buddy of mine is rocking a Ti Chromag with zero issues. Other guys I know rode Moots and LiteSpeed Ti frames for years with no issues.

All that said, I have heard of a lot of issues with Ti welds. Just throwing my anecdotal evidence (with a pic I snapped a week ago) into the pot for the OP to consider. He can do with it what he wishes. He asked us to talk him out of a ti frame. That’s all I got.

PS - I also know a metric $hit tonne of guys who have been rocking the ti Honzo HARD on pro lines for years. You are preaching to the converted. Personally, all other things equal, I think steel is a little more robust. But hey, wouldn’t be the first time I’m wrong.
 

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I've got a Ti frame (Motobecane) that isn't one of the top name brands but I've put thousands of miles on that bike since 2013, and ridden it as both a full-geared / front suspension bike and as a single-speed bike (the current set up), and it's in fine shape....thought about rebuilding it into a gravel bike due to the older geometry.....
 
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Whether a Ti bike is "worth it" is something only you can answer. I tend to think the potential benefits are too nebulous to quantify.

That said, the way I see it, I'd personally rather build a steel frame and sink my money into a good fork, brakes etc. For the same money, I'll bet you could have a nicer build on a steel bike and be pretty competitive with a ti bike weight wise...

Sure Ti won't rust, but given even half-assed attention to basic maintenance, you are more likely to break a steel frame long before rust becomes an issue.
 

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Two of the bikes I'm currently looking at offer their frames in chromoly and Ti. I was initially set on a Ti frame but the more I think about it I keep asking myself is it worth paying 3x the cost on a frame. Aside from saving 2lbs. is there a huge benefit to a Ti frame. I tell myself I could put the $ into a higher end build but then I go right back to wanting that Ti frame.
Can you help talk me out of it or why I should just go for it.
I'm not a racer and there's not much in the way of climbing where that weight saving would matter.Something about that Ti frame though. Talk some sense into me please.

For reference the bikes are a Stanton Switch9er and a RSD MC.
Nope. You don’t really “need” a Ti Hardtail frame.
maybe the question should be: do I want a Ti frame?
The answer is yes.
Life is short so buy the Ti frame.
I did and yes, it rides and looks so good.
modern geo, sliders, supple ride
 

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high pivot witchcraft
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Whether a Ti bike is "worth it" is something only you can answer. I tend to think the potential benefits are too nebulous to quantify.

That said, the way I see it, I'd personally rather build a steel frame and sink my money into a good fork, brakes etc. For the same money, I'll bet you could have a nicer build on a steel bike and be pretty competitive with a ti bike weight wise...

Sure Ti won't rust, but given even half-assed attention to basic maintenance, you are more likely to break a steel frame long before rust becomes an issue.
I coated the inside of all my steel frames with this.
Liquid Fluid Drink Tin Material property

I’m sure I didn’t need to.

IMHO, worrying about rust on a steel frame is tantamount to chasing ghosts. He11, my winter daily commuter is a steel framed Unit. Canadian, salt filled winters.

…sliding dropouts on my Honzo and Unit too…

PS - I’m all for a ti frame. I’m just trying to talk the OP of it, like he asked 🙂

I honestly don’t have much artillery. Trying to make the most of what little I got 😜

OP - go for it. Like others have said, life is short. If biking is your passion, and no loved ones will go hungry, then feed it.
 

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I coated the inside of all my steel frames with this.
View attachment 1958187
I’m sure I didn’t need to.

IMHO, worrying about rust on a steel frame is tantamount to chasing ghosts. He11, my winter daily commuter is a steel framed Unit. Canadian, salt filled winters.

…sliding dropouts on my Honzo and Unit too…

PS - I’m all for a ti frame. I’m just trying to talk the OP of it, like he asked 🙂

I honestly don’t have much artillery. Trying to make the most of what little I got 😜

OP - go for it. Like others have said, life is short. If biking is your passion, and no loved ones will go hungry, then feed it.
Yup, been using Fluid Film myself for decades. Works a treat.
 

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Two of the bikes I'm currently looking at offer their frames in chromoly and Ti. I was initially set on a Ti frame but the more I think about it I keep asking myself is it worth paying 3x the cost on a frame. Aside from saving 2lbs. is there a huge benefit to a Ti frame. I tell myself I could put the $ into a higher end build but then I go right back to wanting that Ti frame.
Can you help talk me out of it or why I should just go for it.
I'm not a racer and there's not much in the way of climbing where that weight saving would matter.Something about that Ti frame though. Talk some sense into me please.

For reference the bikes are a Stanton Switch9er and a RSD MC.
 

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Registered
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Just before the turn of the century I wanted a ti frame in the worst way.
I thought, "It won't rust, offers a supple ride, doesn't have to be painted (in fact ti looks best unpainted) -- it'll be the last frame I ever buy."

So glad I never bought one.

I think of all the changes that mountain bikes have gone through since then...
  • Disc brakes
  • Tapered head tubes
  • Boost spacing
  • Major geo changes
  • Ti is typically hardtail only
It would not have been the last frame I ever bought.
I now ride FS bikes exclusively. Ones with modern geo.

I'm not saying don't do it, I'm just suggesting you consider how you'll feel in a few years.
Maybe you only buy one bike every 10-15 years or so (whereas I don't.)
I average a new bike each year.
But if it fits your master plan, ti is absolutely still a cool metal -- maybe the coolest.
=sParty
I resemble this remark. I moved my old Ti frame for a newer one for exactly those changes - boost, geo, wide tire capacity, etc. But, I think the truly innovative stuff has been figured out at this point and I personally wouldn't have fear of missing out.

I guess I'd look at it this way - are you a hardtail guy, or are you not a hardtail guy or don't know yet? If you are sure you're a hardtail guy and always want to have one in your stable, it may be worth the investment in Ti. If you're not sure, only want one bike and don't know if a hardtail will stick around longer term, Ti might not be worth it. I'm pretty much a die-hard HT guy, so I knew mine would stick around. It has and I've ridden the hell out of it. My squish bikes are the ones that come and go. YMMV.
 

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high pivot witchcraft
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I resemble this remark. I moved my old Ti frame for a newer one for exactly those changes - boost, geo, wide tire capacity, etc. But, I think the truly innovative stuff has been figured out at this point and I personally wouldn't have fear of missing out.

I guess I'd look at it this way - are you a hardtail guy, or are you not a hardtail guy or don't know yet? If you are sure you're a hardtail guy and always want to have one in your stable, it may be worth the investment in Ti. If you're not sure, only want one bike and don't know if a hardtail will stick around longer term, Ti might not be worth it. I'm pretty much a die-hard HT guy, so I knew mine would stick around. It has and I've ridden the hell out of it. My squish bikes are the ones that come and go. YMMV.
I agree with the last part of this. I will keep my road bikes, my hardtails and my rigid, forever. My FS are what get churned. That said, I am entering season 4 with my Druid and I have no intention of dumping it.

But agreed. A hardtail you fall in live with, will end up being a long term love affair. At least for me. I found my true love. It’s not ti. But I will never let it go. It brings me huge joy.
 
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