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I don't have any special bike grease. I'm thinking of using this auto chassis (Castro brand) grease. It's bluish and has the consistency of gooey paste. Will this work or can I just skip the grease part and just bolt on the derailleur dry?
 

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You're probably fine either way. But I like to lightly grease most threads. It eliminates creaks and makes later removal easier. There are various opinions on this, but no hard evidence to help your decision. This usually means it doesn't really matter.
 

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A wheelist
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There's nothing special about any "bike" grease. It's just re-packaged overpriced general lube. The lubrication needs of a bicycle are about one step up from a wheelbarrow.

Always lubricate all threads. The finest thread lube is stuff specially made for threads called "anti-seize compound". On those threads that tend to loosen by themselves, hold the lube and use a thread locker - Loctite is a popular one.
 

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If you train yourself to think about why you do something you'll always know the answer for whether to grease, oil or loctite threaded fastenters.

Greasing, oiling or using anti-sieze compound protects the thread from corrosion, especially that caused by water wicking into the spiral gap inherent in threaded parts. It's important for steel fasters (rust) and whenever dissimilar metals are joined, especailly aluminum against steel. Stainless steel or plated brass fasteners don't usually need this protection.

Lubing threads is also important when maximum holding strength is required, a dry thread may bind before reaching maximum compression.

You wouldn't use a lube where traction or friction is desired as in most adjusting screws, since you want them to stay put.

When torque is specified, it should state whether it applies to dry or lubed threads, since the ratio of compression to torque varies with thread friction. Unfortunately most of the folks in the bike biz. neglect to specify this critical detail when they specify the recommended torque. That's a longstanding pet peeve of mine.

Lastly, use a threadlocker where vibration may loosen or move threaded parts. Using most threadlockers properly also affords a degree of corrosion protection since the material fills all the voids in the thread.
 

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Mike T. said:
There's nothing special about any "bike" grease. It's just re-packaged overpriced general lube. The lubrication needs of a bicycle are about one step up from a wheelbarrow.

Always lubricate all threads. The finest thread lube is stuff specially made for threads called "anti-seize compound". On those threads that tend to loosen by themselves, hold the lube and use a thread locker - Loctite is a popular one.
I like that, " one step up from a wheelbarrow":thumbsup: very true
 

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bottom line

painted seatpost - no grease
carbon - no grease

stem bolts, control bolts, bottle cage bolts, seat post collar bolt, deraillier bolts, axle bolts, bottom brackets and pedals, bare metal seat posts - grease

brake bolts , rotor bolts (6 hole only), shock bolts, chainring bolts - loctite

as mentioned earlier lightly grease the threads before torqueing
 

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grease

Mike T. said:
There's nothing special about any "bike" grease. It's just re-packaged overpriced general lube. The lubrication needs of a bicycle are about one step up from a wheelbarrow.

Always lubricate all threads. The finest thread lube is stuff specially made for threads called "anti-seize compound". On those threads that tend to loosen by themselves, hold the lube and use a thread locker - Loctite is a popular one.
Phil Wood might take exception to that remark!
 

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i very sincerely doubt phil wood refines petroleum into grease.

"good" grease is good because of its stability under heat and extreme pressure.. both things bikes dont subject grease to.. on a bike the only thing that really matters is material compatibility. if its not eating your seals, its good enough grease.
 

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Stevirey said:
Phil Wood might take exception to that remark!
And you might be a marketer's dream. Me, I'll buy lubes aimed at things that rotate a lot faster than the parts of a bicycle. And for those parts that don't rotate I'll use the cheapest lube I can find or lubricants specially designed for that.
 
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