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viva la v-brakes!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm lacing up a new wheel and for some reason most (but not all) of the nipples won't thread in all the way. I back them off and scrub off the spoke prep, thinking that maybe I put too much on and its clogging up the threads. Still no dice. Eventually I realized that most (but not all) of the nipples the shop gave me are for 15 gauge spokes, instead of the 14 gauge spokes I'm using. I pulled just enough new nipples out of my parts bin and I'm back in business. But now I have removed most of the spoke prep from the spoke threads. Do I have to unthread the wheel and re-apply spoke prep? Or is there a shortcut way to do this, maybe dip the tip of the new nipples in spoke prep as I install each one?
 

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I like to use spoke prep but since it is for a front wheel posted in the singlespeed forum (Not downhill) I would say just keep an eye on the tension and ride it as is. Spokeprep does tend to help keep your wheels tensioned a little better though.
 

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AKamp said:
I like to use spoke prep but since it is for a front wheel posted in the singlespeed forum (Not downhill) I would say just keep an eye on the tension and ride it as is. Spokeprep does tend to help keep your wheels tensioned a little better though.
Tensioned evenly and properly a wheel does not need a threadlocker and will not loosen much, if any, no matter the usage.
 

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viva la v-brakes!
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So is spoke prep just a lube? I thought it also gummed up the threads to prevent de-threading.
 

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Duckin' Fonuts.
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Spoke prep is like a very low strength loc-tite in a thicker form (It may be made by Loctite but I haven't used it in a while). DT spoke freeze is made by Loctite and is simply very low strength Loc-tite. Blue loctite is overkill and will probably result in rounded nips unless you only use a teeny tiny bit. Just about any kind of lube during lace up is all that is necessary. Light grease, oil, chainlube, all work. Antisieze is pretty toxic so I avoid it. I like the DT after building as it seals the threads to water quite well for future adjustments.
 

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velocipede technician
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im a wheelsmith guy

pvd said:
this is just dangerous advise. loctite should never be mixed with either oil or plastic.

do not kill people with advise like this.
your funny.........

but dt/swiss disagrees with you:)
 

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FishMan473 said:
So is spoke prep just a lube? I thought it also gummed up the threads to prevent de-threading.
Spoke prep is supposed to make the spokes easier to work with at high tension by keeping them "lubed" while keeping them from loosening at lower tensions. Although I find it still seems to make the nipples harder to turn at high tension. As shiggy said a wheel at proper full tension with even tension all of the way around shouldn't really need something like that, but if it's your first wheel I'd highly recommend using something like spoke prep, spoke freeze, rock n roll's nipple cream, or even old linseed oil. And I'd recommend using brass nipples for your first build. Alloy ones are just too finicky and can really get stuck by those products.
 

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pvd said:
I totally disagree.

have you ever tried blue loctite on wheels?
I have never needed to. My wheels do not loosen. If (a big if) I need to do any truing I do not want any thread-locker making it tougher to turn the nipple. I use nothing but oil on the threads for building and maintenance.

Same applies for machine built wheels I have. I will retension and true after oiling the threads and they stay that way.

Thread-lock is a crutch to hide a bad build.
 

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Shorcut - dip the point of a folded paper towel in spoke prep and dab it onto the threads. You only need a very small amount of the stuff anyway -- if you think you are using to much there is a good chance that you are.

I've built with spoke prep, grease and light oil. All sparingly. No issues.

You shouldn't need Loc-tite to hold a wheel together. At best, it is overkill.
 

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Dawgwalker
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Need for Spoke Prep?

IMHO Spoke Prep is a facilitator that is not harmful but is unnecessary. Linseed oil was used for years before SP was available. Main function of both is lubrication to ease tightening of the spoke.
 
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