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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got done swapping out the 32t ring for a 36t ring and removing the bashguard that came with the Race Face SS crankset. I was able to tighten two of the bolts till they stopped, but noticed that two bolts continued to turn a bit when I tried to tighten the bolt. I then realized that I have regular chainring bolts and since I removed the bashguard, the bolt goes in farther into the the thread.

I looked at my work, and it loks like the chaing ring is tight and secure, just that I can still turn the ring bolts a bit. They're not loose by any means, just that I can still crank them. They're not cross threaded into the the threaded part; rather, the whole bolt unit spins. I can't use any sort of flat screwdriver to hold that back "female" part of the bolt unit beacuse the bolt actually pokes out of about 1/2 mm.

Should I buy SS ring bolts or just save my money and use the RF bolts taht came with my crankset?
 

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Just got done swapping out the 32t ring for a 36t ring and removing the bashguard that came with the Race Face SS crankset. I was able to tighten two of the bolts till they stopped, but noticed that two bolts continued to turn a bit when I tried to tighten the bolt. I then realized that I have regular chainring bolts and since I removed the bashguard, the bolt goes in farther into the the thread.

I looked at my work, and it loks like the chaing ring is tight and secure, just that I can still turn the ring bolts a bit. They're not loose by any means, just that I can still crank them. They're not cross threaded into the the threaded part; rather, the whole bolt unit spins. I can't use any sort of flat screwdriver to hold that back "female" part of the bolt unit beacuse the bolt actually pokes out of about 1/2 mm.

Should I buy SS ring bolts or just save my money and use the RF bolts taht came with my crankset?
If your chainring is good and tight then you are "probably" ok. However I would definitely use some lock-tite on the threads since you are able to still spin the bolts. It's usually the female side of the bolts that are too long and will not allow you to secure your sprocket. You can also use some washers to take up the space left by removing your bashguard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If your chainring is good and tight then you are "probably" ok. However I would definitely use some lock-tite on the threads since you are able to still spin the bolts. It's usually the female side of the bolts that are too long and will not allow you to secure your sprocket. You can also use some washers to take up the space left by removing your bashguard.
Washers! Ha! Why didn't I think of that. Just went to look at my washer box and don't think I have one that will let the female part go through it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
i usually file the female part short enough that it doesn't protrude out the chainring but not too short that it doesn't support the chainring anymore.
the female part doesn't actually protrude past the spider arms that I can see them. If I recall, it is about 10mm in length, maybe a little shorter. It's just that the bolt, once threaded into the female part, protrudes a 1/2 mm past it in the back so that I can't use something flat to hold the female part securely to turn the bolt for the final tightening.

I wish I could find things that cheap at my LBS! But I haven't inquired about cost of ring bolts yet. Cheapest I saw on Ebay was $7 for a set of five. The RF bolts look pretty nice, so hate to replace them, yet then again I prefer SS bolts if it is recommended.
 

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When I install my chainring bolts, I had the same issue with the longer ones. They spun like yours, and felt tight by hand... but not when I hit the trail. I found I needed the shorter bolts.

If you can't secure the female part of the bolt, I would recommend picking up a chainring bolt tool to help. Lbs should have them for like $5-10. It may help you get proper torque on those bolts to see if you really do need shorter ones.
 

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If you don't have washers then new bolts is the best option. I ordered a set of KCNC SS bolts from Fairwheelbikes.com. They were pretty cheap and were mailed really fast. You can also take the chainring bolts you have and head to a home improvements store or lbs and see if you can find washers that fit. My vote is new chainring bolts though.

KCNC Single Speed Chainring Bolts : Fairwheelbikes.com
 

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FYI

http://www.velosolo.co.uk/shopsingle.html do slightly wider chainrings, this means no need for SS specific chain bolts.

I don't work there, just a happy customer

Have since removed the tensioner, running the Holy Grail 2:1 offroad.

I can shift, just not my gears.
 

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Kaishingo
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Hmm - I seem to need shorter chainring bolts. Must be the chainring's fault! I guess the only solution is a $40+USD chainring special ordered from UK :thumbsup:

$10 will get you the right thing - and you have an excuse to visit the LBS.

And filing down the female part to make it fit?? This reminds me of my poor college days where I would spend hours trying to stuff a frayed gear cable through housing so I wouldn't have to pay $3 for a new cable.

FYI

VeloSolo Shop - Singlespeed Spacer Kits, Cogs, Tensioners and Accessories do slightly wider chainrings, this means no need for SS specific chain bolts.
 

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However if you are looking to replace your chainring and your LBS doesn't stock SS parts, then you now know that you can buy them from Velosolo and you will be able to use your existing chainring bolts.

That's all.

No need to flame off cause I gave some information.

I know with SS riders it's all in the mind but sometimes I do wonder ;)


I can shift, just not my gears.
 

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no, you need shorter nuts on those chainring bolts when using a single chainring. standard bolts are designed for either two chainrings, or a chainring and a bashguard. shorter ones available in various places. i shop webcyclery.com.

if you can get away with it based on riding style, a chainring w/o a bashguard is elegant.
 
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