Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i recently converted my trek to a ss..finally got all my parts i wanted on it so the next thing was to get rid of that tensioner so i took it off and went and got a half link. now when the half link is in it is too loose but if i take it out the chain is wayyy to tight..it will go on there but its just wayy to tight..im think i could go up a few sizes in the reer..my gear is currently 34/16 im thinkin 34/18 might work maybe even a 17 and the extra teeth will tighten up the slack..i might be completely wrong.. how should i go about doing this? buy cogs and try them out? will i be wasting time/money? thanks for any help
 

·
NormalNorm
Joined
·
935 Posts
Just my .02

1. You probably will need a tensioner(i would leave the half link in). Do you have horzontal dropouts?
2. Try the current gearing and see if that works. If not go from there. 1 tooth will make abit of difference. If you have any steep hill climbs you will want more than a 16 cog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
820 Posts
Do a search for 'magic gear' calculator. You'll find a link in these pages that takes you to a calculator program that gets you pretty close. You've gotta enter the exact chainstay length of your Trek, the number of teeth front and back, and it'll tell you how far off that ratio is from being the 'magic gear'. Of course, I did this, ended up with results similar to what you've got now, ended up sticking with the tensioner, which is OK. Really.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,931 Posts
Doggity said:
Do a search for 'magic gear' calculator. You'll find a link in these pages that takes you to a calculator program that gets you pretty close. You've gotta enter the exact chainstay length of your Trek, the number of teeth front and back, and it'll tell you how far off that ratio is from being the 'magic gear'. Of course, I did this, ended up with results similar to what you've got now, ended up sticking with the tensioner, which is OK. Really.
It's hard to measuer the chainstay length accurately but there's another way. I've been testing this for a web release just need to make it look slick.

Put on the chainring and cog that gives you the least slack. Press the chain down in the center and measure how far down it goes. Measure from a yardstick resting on the chainring and cog. A perfect fit would show 0".
Tell me your chain length and I can tell you the chainstay length.

If you give the chain length in inches I'll give the chainstay length. Any magic gear calculator will give the gearing for a new chain.
If you give the chain length in links the answer wlll be give a chainstay length that can be used to find the magic gear for that chain.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top