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I talked my brother into buying a new 2018 Django 27.5 Carbon from Evo, it was steeply discounted (3k for a 6k build), arrived ready to assemble, thirty minutes and he was rolling. He had some surgery so it's been sitting, but I took it for a couple spins:

Very lightweight, stiff frame, efficient climber, took hits well, better climber and more agile than my Signal Peak. No real downsides that I could find, though the fork is not plus so I don't think a tire larger than 2.5 would fit; the rear triangle looks big enough for 2.6, 2.8.

Compared to a Hendrix, it feels lighter, quicker, and stiffer.
Compared to an Atlas, it feels similar, better trail geo so more agile and stable at speed, just as good or better for climbing efficiency.

I have not ridden the new Ripley, though the reviews are glowing (aren't they always?).

Which is better? Well, it just depends on what you want and how you ride.

The Django on sale is a good buy, but at full price I'd pass.
 

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Based on climbing efficiency, my guess would be that the dw-link Ripley would climb better. I recently rode the Devinci Troy 29 and found that it climbed well until the trail got rougher. Rocks, roots and other obstacles really seemed to sap forward momentum on the Troy 29 and I would guess that the Django would not be too dissimilar.
Those two bikes couldn't be more different, the Troy is an enduro bike, the Django is a all mountain/XC bike. The 27.5 Troy climbs like crap, always did, never could find the love for that bike. The Django climbs more like an Atlas.
 

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After many more miles on my V4 Ripley, I think my django carbon 29er with a -1.5 Works Component headset would give up nothing to the V4 or any bike on descents that did not have a lot of braking or chatter bumps. I have/had a -1 headset, and it made a big difference. The Ripley has a big advantage on high speed chatter.

But as for climbing, there is nowhere my django stands a chance against the Ripley. I made a thread months ago asking if the Split Pivot was the reason I could not clear this specific section on my local trails. Steep, powerful torque, loose, rocky. The django never did it no matter how I set the bike up or if I had a good day in terms of fitness.

The Ripley obliterates the same section. I'm a top tier climber, and friends were surprised I had to get off on the django each time whether in low or high mode, 25 or 30 sag, gearing changes, etc. On the Ripley someone said "I think you caught air at the top", jokingly, because I was accelerating instead of grinding to a halt.

MSRP for a django is ridiculously high for what you get in terms of weight and performance. As stated, on sale it could be a great option for the right rider.
 

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Hey Westin...so did you upgrade your -1.0 to -1.5 on your Django? Thoughts on the difference between the -1 and -1.5? Are you still running chip in high setting?
 

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NedwannaB
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Hi all,

I'm curious how the 2019 Django compares to the newly released 2019 Ibis Ripley.

I understand they are similar bikes and even have a D-W link pedal platform in common!

I been riding a V1 Ripley for about 4 years now and am looking into my next bike. I've demo'd an earlier Django, although I liked it, it didn't seem to have the climbing prowess of the Ripley.

Fast forward to the current Django, I was reading the specs the other day and noticed it's very similar to the Ripley and an added bonus is that it's a bit cheaper. I also like how it comes with a 140 fork.

Now, I'm sold on the new Ripley - I know what I'm getting. And the company is local - I live in NorCal. They offer good support too.

However, Devinci offers a lifetime warranty on the frame which is nice.

Anyway, I'd be interested in getting some input on this especially if any of you had a chance to demo both bikes recently.

Thanks people! :)
Lil late to the party....but I've had a V1 Ripley myself for a few years. Dont have the budget for new carbon bike so just picked up an alloy GX build Djang 29 (not the '20 so no super boost thank god). Took a few rides getting adjusted to the similarities yet differences of the two(both can be 120/140). Have the Ripley more XC now with 120/120 SID setup with their carbon 928 wheels and Spec Fast Trak tires so now theres a it more gap between the ride characteristics. Think having the two to pick from on different type ride terrain outings will be good.
 

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Hey Westin...so did you upgrade your -1.0 to -1.5 on your Django? Thoughts on the difference between the -1 and -1.5? Are you still running chip in high setting?
I kept it at -1 on the django. It was a nice improvement, but my main reason for selling it for the new Ripley V4 was the DW Link vs Split Pivot in terms of climbing. Absolutely no comparison for the ascents. My Ripley with exact same build kit as the Django is a much easier bike to climb fast, and it clears loose rocky ledgey powerful sections without breaking a sweat that made me fight and sometimes walk on the Django. FWIW, I'm a 160 pound Cat 1 xc climber type.
 

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A good comparison would now be the new Ripley V4 to the 2020 Django. On paper they have almost identical angles.
The Ripley is more XC for sure. I think the Django is more in line with the Transition Smuggler or Kona Process 134.

I've ridden the V4 Ripley, it was awesome, but it also had a $9,400 build kit on it.

After having my eye on the Smuggler for nearly 6 months, I just built up the new Kona Process 134. It's absolutely freakin awesome.

Had the updated Django been an option it would have been on the short list.

I see no down side to the super boost rear spacing. I'd welcome it.
 
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