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Discussion Starter #1
My freinds and I are going to build a DJ park and a Pump track. I have been doing a lot of research trying to find the best set I can find. So does anyone have and good suggestions of webpages or any links that could help me out. I did get the e-book from leelikesbikes.com.

Thanks
 

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is down to roll...
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Flboy said:
My freinds and I are going to build a DJ park and a Pump track. I have been doing a lot of research trying to find the best set I can find. So does anyone have and good suggestions of webpages or any links that could help me out. I did get the e-book from leelikesbikes.com.

Thanks
I think the best advise I could give you is to get a solid commitment from your friends that you all will put in the hours to dig. When you start a line, really plan it out and put some thought and measurments into it. Digging w/ a crew is always much easier. 5-6 people can really make something from a pile of dirt.
-ebR
 

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East Bay Rich said:
I think the best advise I could give you is to get a solid commitment from your friends that you all will put in the hours to dig. When you start a line, really plan it out and put some thought and measurments into it. Digging w/ a crew is always much easier. 5-6 people can really make something from a pile of dirt.
-ebR
true that
 

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Good advice so far. And don't underestimate the amount of time and effort you need to put in even after your done building. My pump track has required a lot of maintenance just to keep it rideable. And I seem to always want to build some new lines once I get bored with it.

So I guess what I'm saying is, you really are never finished building a pump track.
 

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the Leelikesbikes "Welcome to Pump Track Nation" is written well, BUT . . the thing people don't realize is that it is primarily intended for backyards. if you have a lot of space, like a public park, do not build a small 30 ft. X 70ft. oval or figure 8 pump track. that is not what mtb/bmx is all about !! that's a backyard pump track.


SO, lemme just give you some points that I think are essential to a good mtbmx spot.

1. if you are on flat ground, you MUST build a large starting hill, like at a bmx track. there is nothing as lame as having to crank from a standstill.

2. build at least 3 different jump lines with different heights and gaps. the standard bmx skatepark box jump in the old days was 4' tall with an 8' or 10' deck. that is an excellent size for a lot of riding levels. the difficulty has more to do with the mellowness or steepness of the transitions than with the size. for example, in the picture below, is 3 tabletops in a row. the height is probably somewhere between 3'6" on the first one and maybe 4'5" on the last one. the lip to landing gaps should match up pretty closely, unless you're going down hill. you don't want a short jump followed by a long one, or the reverse.
a 7-8 foot lip to landing gap is very easy. 9-10 is normal/intermediate. 11-12 is getting big (unless your transitions are mellow and it's easy to carry some distance. 13+ is intermediate/advanced level. for that to be fun, you MUST be on a decline slope, or have a BIG starting hill to drop in from.


3. space your rollers appropriately.
the rollers you see in the picture below on the left are spaced 13-14 ft. peak to peak. this is typical bmx race track style. you can gain speed, manual through them etc.



4. TABLES are good for beginner and intermediate scenes. if you want more people to show up (and potentially help in the future), build stuff they can ride. this table about 13 or 14 feet from lip to landing. note how deck of table transitions with a curve into the landing. this is good for beginners who are gonna tag their back wheel pretty hard.



5. public city/neighborhood spots should not be built by hand. if the city ok's a dirt jump spot, get someone to rent a bobcat and do all the fundamental work with heavy machinery. most beginner jump spots die before they get started because of the sheer amount of digging it takes to make an awesome spot.

6. resist the urge to make every jump look like a skatepark quarterpipe--one line of steep tranny jumps is cool, but build the others with mellow. you will get plenty of air and it will be a lot smoother.


7. avoid the mistake of small landings. landings are actually more important than launches. you want something that is big and long, starts steep at the top, but has mellow transition at the bottom. here is a typical beginner mistake. a 13' gap but the landing has barely enough surface to get the wheelbase of your bike on.


this is one of the big sets. around 18 feet lip to landing lip gap. but look how big the landing is. tons of transition to land on.
. the more transition you have to land on, no matter how big the jump, the more the jumps will have flow. flat ground is your enemy. rhythm comes from having back to back transitions. inclines, declines, curves.

hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
great pic's and advidce cmc4130 and as far as commitment goes we have got it. This going to be on private property and the land owner came to us to build the park, well it was a mutual coming together. He wants a track and we want a track. We already have the use of bobcats and other heavy equipment. I am trying to find some guidence into build the jumps properly and suggestions of good flow lines. Thanks agin for the great advice on spacing and landings. I know there are a bunch of us MTB's who have done this and know some things to do and not to do.
 

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Here are some plans:

https://www.chuckfurlong.com/SundaysTrails/design.html

These are out of date. The place is no longer called Sundays trails, and the jumps didn't end up being built exactly as you see in the plans.

Also check out Progressive Park Design's plans for the Texas X-Park dirt section:
https://www.progressiveparkdesign.com/Texas_X_Park_Dirt.pdf .


1. RHYTHM SPACING. If you're going to do a rhythm line of jumps (meaning back to back jumps where you have to land smooth to have a good pump to jump the next one), spacing is very important.
The top of the first landing to the lip of the next jump needs to be somewhere between double and triple the gap distance of the jumps. So, if you have a line of 10 foot gap jumps, the landing-to-next-lip distance should be at least 20 ft. That will feel tight. 25ft. is about normal. And 30ft. is plenty of room. These tables are spaced around 25-28 feet. If you do the math, this will also tell you how much room you'll need for a 5 sets of doubles in a row. Big drop in (probably covers 15 feet of the flat ground), at least 30 feet to crank, 10 foot gap, 25 ft pit, 10 ft. gap, 25 ft pit, 10, 25, 10, 25, 10, 25, then some kind of berm to turn around (covering another 15 ft or so). So add it up, that means you need roughly 220 - 250 ft. 80 yards.


2. CONSTRUCTION.
(a) If you have to dig dirt by hand, consider using large objects like solid stacks of logs, railroad ties, bricks/cinder blocks, etc. It will go so much faster, and you'll have a solid under-structure. If you're using logs, the base of the jump has to be a lot wider than you want it at the top, because dirt has a tendency to become mountain shaped.... [EDIT in 2020: Don't go out of your way to bring in objects like logs if they're not readily available; the time it takes to dig the equivalent amount of just-dirt makes it not worth the time to get that stuff just to bury it. Also, don't bury what would be considered trash. When it becomes exposed, people think your spot looks like a dump.]

(b) If you're buying dirt, you can use cheap fill dirt for most of the jump, ESPECIALLY if you're building tables, then put a layer of sandy loam with clay content, or some other kind of clay mixture. In my area, the natural black clay soil is perfect by itself. If you pack it really well, when it dries, it's like cement.

(c) Watering the jumps will prevent the surface cracking and crumbling. So you need to think about where you'll get your water.

 

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A few words about pump tracks, pump-jump tracks, and mid-school bmx rhythm sections.....

1. To take a pump track to the next level, you'll want to move beyond the Leelikesbikes.com designs and build something that looks a lot more like a mini-bmx track. Back to back table tops, lots of rollable doubles, launch-transfers etc.

2. Take a look at this classic 1990's SoCal BMX spot known as Sheep Hills. Watch the very first line. What you'll notice is how the lips are not more than 3 feet off ground level, but the pits are at least 2 feet or more deep--meaning they feel more like 5 foot tall doubles. The cool thing about having landing pits that are bowls with zero flat space is that it makes your rhythm section really smooth. (The bad thing is if you live in a rainy climate, they fill up with water). You can have back to back doubles very close together, but because of the constant transitions you get amazing flow. ** SO, consider using the same concept in your pump track.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?d...+inferno+jason+ball&ei=UicVSKTIA5DQ4ALUg5HnBA


3. Here's another example of back to back low-to-the-ground doubles with deep pits. It was known as the Graveyard section at 9th street.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8418548097557665989&ei=KiMVSLyaIovQ4ALRoLnsBA&hl=en

http://video.google.com/videoplay?d...h+street+bmx+austin&ei=1SoVSJzZMJSw4QKt2eXxBA
 

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Stuff like this just doesn't magically appear...
It takes hard work and dedication.

Obviously everyone where you live is fat and lazy.
 

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I was just about to say, Get out there and make something like it. That's what I'm doing.

All you need is a shovel, dirt, and a tamper. Oh and a lot of manpower helps.
 

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cjcc55 said:
is what cmc4130 posted a jump pump track compared to rhythm pump track?
yes.

rhythm pump tracks in my opinion get boring. if it's not designed to have jumpable aspects to it, it is almost pointless.

the way you space rollers and pits matters A LOT to whether it's a jump-pump track or pump only.
 
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