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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sure this has been beaten to death but I think I found a little different way at this. I wasn't about to pay $150+ for a regular stand if I can't get to the bike from all angles. I did find the ones that connect underneath like the one I made but they are metal. This is 99.9% PVC with the exception being the 2 hinges and 8 screws and nuts. I can use this to repair and store the bike and also put it outside and wash the bike down. It's in there tight enough that it's only going down if somebody intentionally pushed it over. It looks wobbly but it was a problem I could just add more couplings on the bottom legs to make them longer. It didn't need it so I made it short. That was the key, install it all with no glue to test stability and fit.

It was going in my living room so I wanted it to look some what presentable and not a PVC monster contraption looking thing. The wheels are off the ground about 6" but if you want it higher just add couplings and of course more at the extending legs for the stability. Also noteworthy is it's no PVC pipe showing I connected couplings to keep the frame all the same size and neater looking. It also makes the frame more stiff as couplings flex very little if not at all compared to plain PVC. Even schedule 40 flexes some. Total price including the plastic spray paint was around $36. Everything was from either Home Depot or Ace hardware. Parts are 1-1/2 PVC. I thought about using 2" but went with the thinner parts instead. This is stiff enough. That's what she said.



Excuse my dirty floors. My maids and bultler are all not with me any more due to the recession and my inability to keep them all employed during these tough times :D
More pictures of the stand with and without a bike on it: Flickr: Surfacecreationsonline's Photostream
 

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I can't tell from the pics. Are the wheels off the ground when the bike is on the stand?

Also interesting idea about the couplers around the whole bike rack to make it look better. I build a PVC rack for my pickup truck and the coupler thing I might have to copy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Bottom bracket rest:
The bottom rest is a 2" piece of the schedule 40 that I shaped into the bottom bracket. The I wrapped insulation around it and folded it into the pipe. It looks very clean and that is the only regulat PVC pipe showing.
I did it that way because the insulation wrap is about as thick as the wall of the PVC tube and adding that thickness to the PVC tubing made it out to be the same as the couplings which kept the theme of same thickness all the way around.

Floor clearance:
The wheel in front is about 4" and the back is about 8". Adding 5 or more couplings to make it higher would probably be better so you can work on it standing up. Then the legs on the floor would have to be longer also.
I mainly was thinking of storage and cleaning. It is off the ground so it still can be worked on but not as easy. The cool thing is you can add a piece here and there like legos. I also cut a coupling down on the one holding
the down tube to about 1" so it would fit the bike better.
 

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Good idea! I just hang rope over the rafters in my garage. One loop for the seat and one for the handlebars. cumbersome to put the bike into, but once it's in, it's not going to fall!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The insulation is also from Home Depot. I didn't count that into the price as I already had a roll of it. It is 2" wide and about 4mm thick.
It came on a roll that I think is 20-25 feet long in the plumbing section. It is peel and stick. After in and out with the bike I'm thinking it
may require adding another layer at the top as the bike is starting to cut into it. I probably should have made the bottom rest in the same
manner the bottom tube rest was made so it rests into a curved area with more surface area. The hollow tube rest is creating a pressure
point on the lip of the pipe where it is cutting into the insulation.
 

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The insulation is also from Home Depot. I didn't count that into the price as I already had a roll of it. It is 2" wide and about 4mm thick.
It came on a roll that I think is 20-25 feet long in the plumbing section. It is peel and stick. After in and out with the bike I'm thinking it
may require adding another layer at the top as the bike is starting to cut into it. I probably should have made the bottom rest in the same
manner the bottom tube rest was made so it rests into a curved area with more surface area. The hollow tube rest is creating a pressure
point on the lip of the pipe where it is cutting into the insulation.
From the pic, I thought you had rounded off the lip of the bb rest with a file, then put the insulation there...that might be an option also.
 
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