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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I was about to get the Cabelas Pogies for $20, but they looked so cheap, I figured I could do better myself. I have done a lot of sewing projects, so that is no problem.
I live in Colorado, so it won't be THAT cold.

Some design questions:

for closure around the bars, do I just have a big open hole that wraps tight with velcro?
does this seal well enough around the cables?

Will coated dyneema gridstop be too unbreathable - should I get an uncoated cordura, or even goretex?

Would two layers of 200 wt fleece be about right?

How is the wrist entry done - does it close tight, or just stay open a bit?

What can I use for stiffener?

Any Must Have features? I plan on having a handwarmer pocket, at least.

Thanks!
 

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is buachail foighneach me
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most commercially available pogies just have one big opening at the bar that cinches with velcro. on my homemades i have a flap of material on the top part that folds down between the cables and bar to seal it off. i wouldn't worry about breathability. worry about insulation. what you need will depend on the length and intensity of your rides and the temps. i think two layers of fleece will be more than enough, and personally, i like a layer of lightweight ripstop on the inside so that my hands slide in and out easily. the best material i've found for a stiffener is aluminum screening. cut it to shape and duck tape the edges. insert it between the outer layer and the first insulation layer. duck taping the edges is very important with it. be thorough.

EDIT: oh, and wrist entry open. if it's tight you wont be able to get your second hand in it.

don't forget to add bar end loops for holding them upright. and, try to not make them ginormously oversized like i tend to do....
 

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I'm attracted to Gravity!
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
can I make mine work with bar ends, or should I just take them off for winter? If they are too big they will be less thermally efficient.

How easy are they (generally) to take off and put back on?
Some of my winter rides will be relatively warm and sunny during the day on the uphill, then when the sun goes down and its time to come back downhill, it gets REALLY cold.
Would it be practical to just stow them in the pack until needed?

Thanks for the informative response!
 

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is buachail foighneach me
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bar ends are very good to have in the winter. they help keep the pogies where the should be(via the afroementioned loop) and i find the increased hand positions even more benneficial in the winter. don't make them snug at all. trust me, you wont have to worry about thermal efficiency. my first pair i made out of plastic grocery bags an old t-shirt and duck tape. they were very warm down to about 20 degrees while they were still intact. block the wind, make a pocket to trap the warm air and your internal engine will take care of the rest.
 

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is buachail foighneach me
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sean salach said:
bar ends are very good to have in the winter. they help keep the pogies where the should be(via the afroementioned loop) and i find the increased hand positions even more benneficial in the winter. don't make them snug at all. trust me, you wont have to worry about thermal efficiency. my first pair i made out of plastic grocery bags an old t-shirt and duck tape. they were very warm down to about 20 degrees while they were still intact. block the wind, make a pocket to trap the warm air and your internal engine will take care of the rest.

i really should make a habbit of reading an entire post before responding...

they're fairly easy to take on and off, but better would be to make them so that they could be rolled down.
 

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I made mine out of Reflectix, velco, and tape. Works pretty well actually. I wish they had H-bar compatible pogies without getting super expensive custom ones.
 

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Here are the ones I make.

I use a synthetic batt insulation which is pre-quilted to a light nylon tafetta. A little insulation goes a long way. Get the THIN stuff like for a light jacket, not sleeping bag material. The nylon is nice and slippery for getting your arms in and out and snow does not stick to it like fleece. The quilted insulation also gives the pogies a nice structure so they hold their shape for years of use without getting all floppy. The dart I sew in also gives them a decent box shape that stiffens them and keeps the fabric from pressing on your hands.

For the shell I use 2-layer Ultrex (like GoreTex but cheaper). Really cuts the wind, waterproof, and holds up very well except in crashes on rock/pavement.

I make the top longer than the bottom so that the hole is roughly perpendicular to the ground when you insert your hands. this helps keep snow out, and when the bike is parked the top is a "roof" to also help keep crap out.

I will attach some (bad) pictures. if you see quilting, the pogies are turned inside out. The squares on the rotary cutter mat at 1" for scale reference. It should make it pretty easy to copy the shape. The left and right sides are not identical, but rather mirror images, because of the overhanging tops. Make a set out of newspaper the first time so you get the idea, and then use them for a pattern.





Top:

Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18 Show Content


Bottom:







Top inside out (note the dart in upper right):



Bottom inside out:



Arm hole:



 

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Nice pogies tscheezy. Without fleece, what kind of gloves do you wear depending on temperature outside? I'm a pogie noob, never tried them, but gotta be better then gloves alone.

Also what keeps the wind/ rain / snow from exploiting the seams?

I need pogies for between 0 - 32 deg F. I'm interested in custom, so I can build something that goes around my commuter bike's Novara Trekking bar, but also make one for my snow bike's riser bar.

Time to bribe the wife to take on this sewing project...
 
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is buachail foighneach me
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If you have to deal with rain:

1 - go with waterproof outer shell

2 - wool insulation will be a little heavier, but better IMO

3 - use seam sealer. you can get several different types at any craft/sewing/outdoors store.

4 - consider adding a drain hole at the lowest point.
 

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Without fleece, what kind of gloves do you wear depending on temperature outside?
I commute all winter without gloves using these. That keeps me comfy for around town jaunts down to about 10 F (-12 C). We rarely get down below 10 F here. If so, a medium weight pair of fleece gloves would be enough under the pogies. They really work very well.

I'm a pogie noob, never tried them, but gotta be better then gloves alone
Amazingly so. As I said, I commute all winter here in coastal Alaska with no gloves, just pogies. Riding offroad with them I will often add a light pair of gloves under the pogies, but my hands often end up sweating.

Also what keeps the wind/ rain / snow from exploiting the seams?
The whole top and whole bottom are solid pieces. There are the seams on the sides, and you could seam seal those. Generally if it's raining, it's not that cold out. If it's cold, liquid water is not an issue. No snow is going to wiggle through a seam. I ride in the rain a lot and have not felt the need to seal the seams, personally. They will get damp after a period of riding in solid rain, but then every thing else is going to end up we too.
 

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The biggest advantage, in my opinion, is the wind protection. I have made a couple sets out of vinyl. One had no insulation, and one had a layer only on the top/forward surface. There was not much difference in hand comfort between the two; so I think simply creating a pocket of still air around my hands kept them warm. When riding on road section, where my riding speed was faster, there would be enough air circulation to cool my hands off, but as soon as I slow to trail speeds my hands would warm up. Mind you, this was all with summer-type long finger gloves while riding in temperatures as low as mid-teens.

An addition I used in my design was a plastic stay running lengthwise along the back/top panel to keep them from collapsing down, and I also used a piece of plastic threaded through the wrist hem to keep it open. I used pieces of vinyl siding for a house (gotta be creative with your resources!), but you could also use a plastic milk jug or laundry detergent bottle, or...
 

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Polk said:
I have made a couple sets out of vinyl.

...you could also use a plastic milk jug or laundry detergent bottle, or...
Soooo ghetto. :D

If the back (where your arm enters) is wide open, then yes, they only offer wind protection. If the back is even somewhat close fitting and reduces the number of air exchanges, however, the amount of insulation does make a significant difference. I made a set from slightly thicker insulation (about twice the loft of my usual sets). This made them feel snug enough against my sleeves that I didn't like the the fit as much, and MAN did they make my hands hot. I put them on my wife's bike and she loves the extra warmth and narrower proportions.

Real hardcore winter pogies will have a knitted ribbed cuff or similar at the entrance to really seal the arm hole. They are also sometimes big enough to double as a bivy. :)
 

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starkm32 said:
tscheezy, would you please sell me a pair of your pogies? thumbsup:
If you'd make a small series, count me in for a pair :) !

Probably cheaper then getting a sewing machine, the medical bill from having my fingers un-stitched etc :D
 

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Wow, looks like you did an amazing job. Want to provide some construction and material details to benefit other DIYers?
 

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I'm attracted to Gravity!
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Shell: dyneema/spectra gridstop
Liner: Momentum leftover from my primaloft pants project (from www.thru-hiker.com)
Insulation: 2 layers of standard fleece
Stiffener: Pieces of a Sysco Classic Syrup jug, 3 layers thick, 2 inches or so wide, sewn together. About the length of the arm section. Duct taped up real good.

Next time I would just use synthetic insulation, as I ended up doing all those steps anyway. And a gore-tex shell.

It has a torpedo shaped insert along the outside curve and a potato shaped insert along the inside curve for some 3D. Next time I would have a 2in or wider piece go all the way around the whole thing. This would necessitate modifying the whole pattern.
The entry hole is a good diameter for me. With only a few layers on, it has some ventilation, but when the puffy jacket comes out it seals right up. I might add a fleece collar around the entry to make it a bit smaller.

I made up a pattern in CAD (Cardboard Aided Design) then made one all the way through. The downshift lever (sram trigger) was hard to use, so I seam ripped it open and added in the potato shaped insert on the inside curve.

They were warmer without gloves than with (damp) liner gloves. My hands never got cold, but never got warm either.

There are full bar ends in there. They help stabilize the pogies, but are almost useless as bar ends with this setup. I have two velcro straps, one at the base of the bar end, one at the elbow. The elbow strap held the pogies too horizontal, so I am not using them. I am considering angling my bar ends down a few degrees to get more space below the brake levers.
 
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