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Huckin' trails
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As long as it works you're riding. It's all what's matter at the end of the line.

Good initiative. Should a reverse kind of tool also work to remove them by reusing about the same bits or a new rig would be required ?
 

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All fat, all the time.
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Discussion Starter #4
I made another tool for removal of the other cups, & it worked well.
I found some thick-walled PVC pipe about 12" long, 3/4" outside diameter. I cut two slices about 4-5" long on one end, then wedged a piece of wood inside to hold them about 1.5" apart. Heated slightly with propane torch & let cool. Once cool, remove wood & you can slide through the head tube, & the plastic end will pop open once inside. Then hammer & it pops out.
Similar idea to the park tools: Park Tool Co. » RT-1 : Head Cup Remover : Headset

I think it would be better to use 1" copper pipe, but hardware store only had 2' pieces & wanted $15 sheesh.

The PVC version worked OK & I'm sure would take a few cups out, but for $2 hey it worked!
 

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I made a headset press just like this last summer for about 129 cents. I have used it once and it works great. One helpful hint though is to do one side at a time to help them go in straight. if they dont start straight then back up and start again. I drilled a hole in a wood block that i use on one side that is bigger then the washers so they are bigger then the head tube. Ill get some pictures when i go to use it in a few weeks with my new build.
 

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This trainer is ready!
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Alignment is a great thing to mention Gsromich, better quality frames (Using lighter/thinner walled tubing) will crack much easier if the cups are going in crooked.

One other suggestion, have a couple of smaller washers available to mimic the contact loading of the Park Headset tool. It presses only on the flange that fits into the headtube, that way it doesn't bend the "bowl" that the bearings sit in. Aluminum headset cups are susceptible to this, steel not so much. Using a washer that sits just inside the headset cup will prevent installing a headset cup you bent in the process.

Great thread, thanks for starting this one!
 

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another good reason to use a large block of wood instead of the washers is that it helps keep the headset straight. I found the washers pivoted easily on the bolt and it made it more difficult to install the headset.

I have some picks on my blog

DIY Headset Press | BikeLife365
I like your idea and am going to modify my press from the current brass fitting washers to the wood blocks, so right about the sloppy fit.
 

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I used 2 old bearings out of an XT bottom bracket last night to press in a headset. They fit nicely in the cup, as opposed to pressing on top of it with a washer.
 

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Saving lives with knives.
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Yep, the key is stack washers, otherwise they will bend... Worked great on several builds of mine. For removal, I use a PVC tube with 4 slits, splayed out, works like a charm.
 

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I took a similar approach, but improved the design ;) I used Park's cup guides from the actual HHP-2 tool. You can find them on Amazon for $30 or so. I also used a 3/4" threaded rod (12" long) and two 3/4" washers/nuts. Plans for the future are to weld a "T-handle" to one end so I only need one wrench to use it. I'll probably weld it to the nut so the washer still has a wide surface to rest against. All-in-all a very comparable alternative to the $140 Park tool as it virtually is the same thing since it's using the same cup guides.




I'm also going to make a headset cup remover like this as soon as I can find an old seatpost that will work. My spare 30.9 post is too wide.

 

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The Bubble Wrap Hysteria
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I took a similar approach, but improved the design ;) I used Park's cup guides from the actual HHP-2 tool. You can find them on Amazon for $30 or so. I also used a 3/4" threaded rod (12" long) and two 3/4" washers/nuts. Plans for the future are to weld a "T-handle" to one end so I only need one wrench to use it. I'll probably weld it to the nut so the washer still has a wide surface to rest against. All-in-all a very comparable alternative to the $140 Park tool as it virtually is the same thing since it's using the same cup guides.




I'm also going to make a headset cup remover like this as soon as I can find an old seatpost that will work. My spare 30.9 post is too wide.

How does it work with fixed bearing headsets like King and Cane Creek? :)
 

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Do you mean integrated headsets? :confused: I'm not familiar with fixed bearing headsets...a quick Google search led me to integrated headsets, is that what you mean?
No clue who you are replying to, but integrated headsets do not need a press. The bearings just drop into seats in the headtube.
 

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No clue who you are replying to, but integrated headsets do not need a press. The bearings just drop into seats in the headtube.
I'm replying to the post right above mine regarding "fixed bearing headsets".........

I wasn't sure whether he meant integrated or zero stack style headset cups.

Either way, the tool is going to handle everything that the Park HHP-2 will. That's that.
 

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I think he meant that ck and cc both recommend you use their adapters for their headsets. which would work with your set up. because they just slide over.
 
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