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Feeding your addiction
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trail fairy
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ah sweet guys, I haven't seen Ti spring in all sizes before go up to 700# or at least available and all from one supp so thought dang!

You guys must have good hook ups Ive not seen Ti even in USD prices for under 250 even contacting direct so ya gots to share MOAR or maybe I been dropped off the secret :D homie newsleter again
 

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Fitting to a CCDB

You will need to be careful if ordering for a CCDB 7.5"/190mm i2i. Compared to some other shocks it has very little free space to get the spring on to the body and get the retaining end plate back on again.

I got the 2.25" 400lb and 450lb Nuke Proof Titanium springs for my CCDB from Chain Reaction, which are 124mm and 125mm, and they both needed partial compression to mount the end plate.

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=15605
 

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trail fairy
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good point Decender but are these similar to Nuke proof springs?

Here's the tech marketing jargon I dunno about all his stuff this is there stuff

dosen't say anything about ya points but good to be in the know, still I'd rather that than have to use compression ring to ramp up, Ti dosen't sag like steel but it's nice to know ya have some room esp for a big guy like Zilla an me LOL

The Technical Jargin
Titanium is most often mined as the ore rutile or ilmenite. Titanium is rather difficult to fabricate because of its susceptibility to oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen impurities which cause the titanium to become more brittle.
Elevated temperature processing must be used under special conditions in order to avoid diffusion of these gasses into the titanium. Commercially produced titanium products are made in the following mill wrought forms: plate, tubing, sheet, wire, extrusions, and forgings. Titanium can also be cast, which must be done in a vacuum furnace because of titanium's reactive nature.
Nearly all titanium metal used for production is an alloy. Like other pure metals, pure titanium requires the addition of alloys that performance applications demand.

What It Means To Us In Terms Of Suspension
In racing, where performance is everything, reducing weight is always a goal. The properties of titanium allow the design of a lighter spring with added travel and more resistance to set. Titanium springs are often 30 to 50% lighter than steel springs. The result is around a 2 lb. weight savings. The lower weight improves suspension dynamics and response. This reduced mass and inertia increases the natural frequency of the spring (A little more Technical Jargin).
A titanium spring is more responsive then a steel spring and helps the suspension keep the tires on the ground for better traction and handling. The substantial weight savings also improves the suspension performance by reducing the mass and inertia generated by movement of the suspension system. A lighter suspension system will have improved response and performance…Kind of like shaking a bowling ball versus shaking a balloon. This is why you have heard how important it is to reduce un-sprung weight.
Titanium has a lower torsional modulus than steel. It is in effect "more springy". Because of this titanium springs are designed with slightly larger wire but fewer coils. The result is a spring with more available travel than a steel spring of the same free length and rate.
 

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trail fairy
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Bikezilla said:
Woah I didn't realize Ellsworth sold springs.

I have no delusions...it's all about the bling!
thats why I never put any stock in that chit, keep it simple stupid, good relevant info, too much infofrom the marketing department and ya get POO :D
 

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It's not all bling!

My 400lb titanium spring was about 130gm lighter than the standard steel one. Its not much but a 1/4lb is a 1/4lb.

The ones I measured were (apologises for the metric):

400lb 120mm 350gm - standard steel
400lb 124mm 220gm
450lb 125mm 266gm
500lb 125mm 244gm

The 500lb spring had a very sparse coil, hence it weighed less than the 450lb.

So even ignoring the marketing bs, they are lighter, better looking and don't rust, what's not to like?
 

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Diverse Suspension is a cool guy out of southern cali, I know him well he is a super talented rider and an engineer. I have bought a couple of moto springs from him. The springs are really nice at a decent price for Ti.

Give him as hout and he can ghet wantever size and weight you need.
 
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