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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey!
I’m building my wife a new wheelset on her Intrigue 29 (Trance X women’s counterpart). We are looking to shave a little weight off the bike while upgrading and the wheels are a great start. However, the basic dual compound Minion FBF isn’t doing anything for her as it’s just not necessary, and if it were, we’d swap for a Maxxterra version anyway. The Dissector on the rear is surprisingly fast rolling and the dual compound is great back there. What do you think about a Forekaster up front? I haven’t seen anything on that combo? Anyone use? WI trails, not terribly aggressive, on a bike that we might want to hit some races with also!

thanks for any and all thoughts!
 

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I do not like the Forekaster up from as much as the DHF, DHR, or Dissector. However, I do prefer the squared off profile in front. I do like the Forekaster in the back...about the lightest tire I have run with good luck.
 

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I've never seen anyone run a Forekaster up front with something beefier out back. Dissector front with Rekon rear is a popular combo, so the Forekaster in the rear would be similar.

I currently have Bontrager XR4 2.4 front and Forekaster 2.35 rear on my trail bike and have been happy with the performance.
 

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My lovely bride has a Dissector, DC 27.5x2.4 on the back with an Assegai 3c 27.5x2.5 up front. The weight really isn't an issue and it gives her a huge amount of confidence. They roll surprisingly well.

But, for sure a Dissector front and back would be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I love the feedback here and I appreciate all the recommendations so far. I’m really resonating with MSU Alums reminder that confidence of having that borderline plus chunky tire at the end of that slack fork is really what’s getting her back in the game and not tensing up before impacts and impacting her back. I might lean toward the Dissector up front again. It’s a half pound lighter than the FBF, has a really nice rolling centerline, and will be just as confidence inspiring and forgiving on a rock garden with a rough exit that we face on our regular ride. I’m guessing it would hold its own on some races as well (on par with the rest of the 140mm trail platform at least). I know my fastest laps were on trail bikes! Keep it coming!!
 

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I love the feedback here and I appreciate all the recommendations so far. I'm really resonating with MSU Alums reminder that confidence of having that borderline plus chunky tire at the end of that slack fork is really what's getting her back in the game and not tensing up before impacts and impacting her back. I might lean toward the Dissector up front again. It's a half pound lighter than the FBF, has a really nice rolling centerline, and will be just as confidence inspiring and forgiving on a rock garden with a rough exit that we face on our regular ride. I'm guessing it would hold its own on some races as well (on par with the rest of the 140mm trail platform at least). I know my fastest laps were on trail bikes! Keep it coming!!
Just a couple other points. My wife is 5'7" tall and had some knee pain. I don't know if you've selected a crankset yet, but going from a 175 to a 170, amazingly, has eliminated that pain.
Also, though I've weight-weenied out her bike (Next SL cranks, SB5 Turq carbon frame/wheelset, etc.) I haven't found the addition of weight on the tires to be as much of a factor as one would think. We have a 12 mile out and back in the Wasatch, the 9k trail, that is almost all above 9000 feet with 2000 feet of climbing fairly evenly dispersed. She's 68 years old and though she doesn't hammer it, when she's done, she's not gassed!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just a couple other points. My wife is 5'7" tall and had some knee pain. I don't know if you've selected a crankset yet, but going from a 175 to a 170, amazingly, has eliminated that pain.
Also, though I've weight-weenied out her bike (Next SL cranks, SB5 Turq carbon frame/wheelset, etc.) I haven't found the addition of weight on the tires to be as much of a factor as one would think. We have a 12 mile out and back in the Wasatch, the 9k trail, that is almost all above 9000 feet with 2000 feet of climbing fairly evenly dispersed. She's 68 years old and though she doesn't hammer it, when she's done, she's not gassed!
Good points. It's a ~33 lb full suspension trail bike with an overall workhorse, yet keeper of a build with entry Fox shocks (36), SLX, and aftermarket grade, but basic aluminum build parts. I think we can get it down to 31 with the wheels and tires and swapping to another saddle. Cassette, cranks and bars will be down the road a little. As is, she's enjoying sitting through the rough stuff a little more versus flicking it around like the old 25lb superfly that we are coming from. As a whole, I couldn't recommend this bike enough. I'm seeing some of the compounds on the Assegai and FBF can get pretty light, so thanks for bringing up the assegai and making me look at some charts!
 

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Hey!
I'm building my wife a new wheelset on her Intrigue 29 (Trance X women's counterpart). We are looking to shave a little weight off the bike while upgrading and the wheels are a great start. However, the basic dual compound Minion FBF isn't doing anything for her as it's just not necessary, and if it were, we'd swap for a Maxxterra version anyway. The Dissector on the rear is surprisingly fast rolling and the dual compound is great back there. What do you think about a Forekaster up front? I haven't seen anything on that combo? Anyone use? WI trails, not terribly aggressive, on a bike that we might want to hit some races with also!

thanks for any and all thoughts!
I'm using Forekasters front and rear on my 120mm trail bike. No complaints but I know their limitations. It's a strange tire that is a master of none and doesn't really do anything exceptionally great. But it isn't horrible in any one condition and you never have that feeling of having the worst tire imaginable for a possible scenario. But you also never have that comfortable feeling that you have the best possible tire for any given condition either. If you don't push hard and aren't constantly flirting with the limits of your traction it can be a good all around tire. A little worse rolling resistance and a little better traction than Maxxis's XC tires.
 

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I roll a Forekaster in the front and a Rekon in the rear on both my hardtail and full suspension. I feel that the Forekaster has saved what would have been washouts through curves many times, and I think it's a fast rolling tire. They both have limits, but as all around tires, I don't think I'd look for anything else in a front rear combo. I use 2.35 front and 2.25 rear, if that matters.

None of this should help you at all though, since I suck horribly as a mountain biker.
 

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Hey!
I'm building my wife a new wheelset on her Intrigue 29 (Trance X women's counterpart). We are looking to shave a little weight off the bike while upgrading and the wheels are a great start. However, the basic dual compound Minion FBF isn't doing anything for her as it's just not necessary, and if it were, we'd swap for a Maxxterra version anyway. The Dissector on the rear is surprisingly fast rolling and the dual compound is great back there. What do you think about a Forekaster up front? I haven't seen anything on that combo? Anyone use? WI trails, not terribly aggressive, on a bike that we might want to hit some races with also!

thanks for any and all thoughts!
I'll throw a couple more curve balls out there, just to muddy the waters, and to mix my metaphors.

For us, tire weight isn't an issue. Rotating mass isn't an issue, as our climb speeds on a long grunt are pretty constant and downhills take care of themselves. Really, for the downhills, controlling speed is more important that achieving speed, for my wife and sometimes for me as well.

Re-reading your post had me rethinking this for your riding. You may (especially with racing potential) be in a situation where you change speeds a lot and may need to accelerate back up to speed frequently. In that case, I can definitely see the need for a light tire/wheel combo, as in that case rotating weight becomes considerably more of an issue, I think.

I was not able to get excited about the Rekon, for my riding, but a similarly designed tire is the Continental Cross King.

About 7 years or so ago, I got a couple of them (when they were the X-King) and neither my wife, nor I could make it 2 miles without tearing knobs off. Then about a year ago, I saw an MTBR thread on the newer Cross King and decided to give them a try. Much like the Rekon, they didn't quite do it for me, but I thought they rolled faster and gripped better than the Rekon. In the 29x2.3, Protection, Black Chili the Cross King was mighty fast on the back, and held up well. On a 27i rim, it was at the advertised ETRTO of 58mm. They aired up well tubeless with no weeping, and weight was right about 750 grams and it accelerated very well.

For the front, it wasn't enough for me, so I put on a Mountain King that worked much better up front, same carcass, fast rolling, same weights and dimensions.
It cornered and braked pretty well, but again, not quite well enough for me and I ended up with that on the back and a Trail King up front. But, that's a heavier tire. My Assegai/Dissector combo rolls almost as well, but the increase in grip in all dimensions is much better, and I wouldn't go back.

A Cross King/Mountain King combo would come in close to 1.5Kg total and roll and grip well for your conditions, I think. The Rekons in my application were 29x2.4 WT and come in at about 2.35" and were close to 150 grams heavier (EXO, 3C) per tire than the Continentals.

Before I put the Assegai/Dissector on my wife's bike, I tried them on mine and really have found them to be great, but your needs may be a bit different.
Anyway, good luck, if nothing else, they could be race day tires.
 

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I love the Forekaster as a rear tire, in the dry, the loam and the mud, just flat out works around here. I think the problem for me anyway, using it as front is the fact that it only comes in DC. It just doesn't have the bite that a Maxx terra or Maxx grip has to offer, even with its open tread design. I have tried it up front and never had the confidence in it after a couple sketchy episodes.
 

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I think it might have something to do with everyone's ability how they like a certain tire. I was very impressed with the Forekaster up front for a long time. It seemed to add an edge to my riding I didn't have before, but now that I've used it for so long, I feel I might have reached the limit of what benefit it can offer me with my challenged skillset. Someone else much better at handling a bike might try it out and immediately find its faults, where I had to mature in my skills in order to discover them.

It does a good enough job for me though. I just need to watch it a bit in the corners now. I can live with that... I'm no racer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'll throw a couple more curve balls out there, just to muddy the waters, and to mix my metaphors.

For us, tire weight isn't an issue. Rotating mass isn't an issue, as our climb speeds on a long grunt are pretty constant and downhills take care of themselves. Really, for the downhills, controlling speed is more important that achieving speed, for my wife and sometimes for me as well.

Re-reading your post had me rethinking this for your riding. You may (especially with racing potential) be in a situation where you change speeds a lot and may need to accelerate back up to speed frequently. In that case, I can definitely see the need for a light tire/wheel combo, as in that case rotating weight becomes considerably more of an issue, I think.

I was not able to get excited about the Rekon, for my riding, but a similarly designed tire is the Continental Cross King.

About 7 years or so ago, I got a couple of them (when they were the X-King) and neither my wife, nor I could make it 2 miles without tearing knobs off. Then about a year ago, I saw an MTBR thread on the newer Cross King and decided to give them a try. Much like the Rekon, they didn't quite do it for me, but I thought they rolled faster and gripped better than the Rekon. In the 29x2.3, Protection, Black Chili the Cross King was mighty fast on the back, and held up well. On a 27i rim, it was at the advertised ETRTO of 58mm. They aired up well tubeless with no weeping, and weight was right about 750 grams and it accelerated very well.

For the front, it wasn't enough for me, so I put on a Mountain King that worked much better up front, same carcass, fast rolling, same weights and dimensions.
It cornered and braked pretty well, but again, not quite well enough for me and I ended up with that on the back and a Trail King up front. But, that's a heavier tire. My Assegai/Dissector combo rolls almost as well, but the increase in grip in all dimensions is much better, and I wouldn't go back.

A Cross King/Mountain King combo would come in close to 1.5Kg total and roll and grip well for your conditions, I think. The Rekons in my application were 29x2.4 WT and come in at about 2.35" and were close to 150 grams heavier (EXO, 3C) per tire than the Continentals.

Before I put the Assegai/Dissector on my wife's bike, I tried them on mine and really have found them to be great, but your needs may be a bit different.
Anyway, good luck, if nothing else, they could be race day tires.
Good review. I appreciate the additional input. It's kind of a dance- if we go "too xc", there would be more need for accelerating quickly because we are picking lines and braking more. With the big chunk up front, we both maintain speed better and just maintain the higher gear and plug away. My personal answer for this was a new Nobby Nic in the rear and a Vittoria Mazza in front.
 

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I'm actually one of the few FK fans out there. Currently 2.6 f and 2.35 r on a 120/130 trail bike.

I just find it to be an even mannered, predictable tyre that holds up well and isn't too heavy.

I don't know if the OP mentions sizes but yeah assuming Dissector 2.4 and FK 2.35 rear I'd go FK on the rear.
 
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