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Baby Bear is in the house
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yes, but...

phazer said:
Can i fit disce brakes to my bike?
...you'd need to get disc-specific hubs [if my eyes are not mistaken]. Your frame and fork are disc brake-compatible. Go to a good bike shop and ask for their recommendations.
 

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Domestic Fowl
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Just an FYI,

You're probably looking at around $450+ to put discs on your bike. You will need to purchase a set of disc compatible wheels, then a set of brakes. You just need to decide if you want to put that much into your bike. Looks like you have the integrated shifter/brake lever so you would want to go with cable pull discs (Avid or Hayes) rather than hydraullics. Otherwise, you would also need to change out your shifters/levers.
 

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phazer said:
Can i fit disce brakes to my bike?

I basically agree with FRC, except that I think it will cost you less than $450.

I may be wrong, but the rims on your bike look pretty heavy. You can get an equivalent, or better, replacement for $100 or so from SUpergo

You should probably be able to get the whole deal for around $280.

I'd suggest getting a disc wheelset from Supergo. They have a Rhin0 Lite / De0re set on sale for $100. Add 2 sets of @vid Mechanical Brakes ($90 or less, each wheel) and you're set to go!
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
FreeRangeChicken said:
Just an FYI,

You're probably looking at around $450+ to put discs on your bike. You will need to purchase a set of disc compatible wheels, then a set of brakes. You just need to decide if you want to put that much into your bike. Looks like you have the integrated shifter/brake lever so you would want to go with cable pull discs (Avid or Hayes) rather than hydraullics. Otherwise, you would also need to change out your shifters/levers.
Yup, shifter and brake lever are integrated. Hydraullic dsce brakes are better than cable pull ones right?

Would disc brakes really make a BIG differance? Or can I spent the money better on another part of my bike?
 

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Where do you ride?

phazer said:
Would disc brakes really make a BIG differance?
Only in the wet and on long, very technical downhills. If it is dry where you ride, you'll be fine with V brakes. If your downhills are anything less than extreme, again you'll be fine with V brakes.

This is not a smart upgrade in most cases at $280 for new wheels and brakes. How much is $280 versus the value of the bike?
 

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Riding free's the mind
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Disc brakes good

Disc brakes are on the top of my list for upgrades. I would recommend them for anyone that takes their mtn bikes on dirt trails. Better power, little fade after long descents, and not as prone to dirt and dust always grinding your rims like w/v-brakes. This translates to better speed and safety on the trails. I will never go back to v-brakes.

The Avid Mechanical discs are a economical way to get into discs without sacrificing performance along with the easy adjustability of your old v-brakes.
 

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does that frame support rear disks?
I know my Zaskar LE does not.
WOld not be that much to outfit your front wheel w/ disks.
Could be done for like $200 w/ good quality i bet.
I have never riden disks myself but am affraid of
going over the bars w/ just one on the front :eek:
I dont ride in much slop so i have never considered
aside from coolness factor...that matters little though i guess.
 

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Alright this is the bottom line, Disc breaks are good, but it’s not worth it for you to go through that trouble. You'd prolly havta swape your hubs and buy disc compatible ones which if you don't know how to lace wheels you will be hit up for not only the hubs but also probably a 50 dollar service charge. Then you still have to buy the breaks and most likely you should probably upgrade the break levers and cables (which is $$$).

What I would do with that bike is not upgrade it and ride it to the death. If you want a serious type XC bike (like it sounds like) start with something little higher end (its much easier to buy a package then start customizing your original bike… also a lot cheaper). If you have just started riding in the past 2 years or something you probably don’t need disc. I rode for about 5 years with a non-disc bike, and did a little trial riding with non-disc breaks. Also to be 100% honest I do not see a huge difference between my hayes disc breaks on my P2 versus my non-discs on my rockhopper besides the discs are low maintance, and work better when wet. For me there wouldn’t be a reason I would have gotten disc over good old pads especially for XC riding. There are many other things you could do with your money for your bike to make it better, and besides: how many instances do you wish you had more breaking power for XC riding? I had very little problems when I rode my rockhopper around. Only in very muddy wet weather, going down very steep hills did I ever wish for a disc break. I’d re-think your upgrade before laying that cash down.
 

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Domestic Fowl
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phazer said:
Yup, shifter and brake lever are integrated. Hydraullic dsce brakes are better than cable pull ones right?

Would disc brakes really make a BIG differance? Or can I spent the money better on another part of my bike?
Hydraulics are not necessarily "better" than cable pulls. I really like the cable pulls for ease of maintenance and lower cost. I've got Avid mechanicals(cable pull) on both of my bikes and I love them. Both of my bikes would be considered to be top-end bikes.

Would discs make a big difference? I can't say. Personally, I don't think I'll ever go back to rim brakes. For your bike you have to consider the cost of the upgrade versus the total cost ofthe bike. It's generally way more expensive to convert a bike after you buy it than to get it with discs when you buy the bike. You've got to figure out if the upgrade cost is palatable for you. The upgrade cost may be a significant percentage of the total cost of the bike.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
dukeblaster said:
Alright this is the bottom line, Disc breaks are good, but it's not worth it for you to go through that trouble. You'd prolly havta swape your hubs and buy disc compatible ones which if you don't know how to lace wheels you will be hit up for not only the hubs but also probably a 50 dollar service charge. Then you still have to buy the breaks and most likely you should probably upgrade the break levers and cables (which is $$$).

What I would do with that bike is not upgrade it and ride it to the death. If you want a serious type XC bike (like it sounds like) start with something little higher end (its much easier to buy a package then start customizing your original bike… also a lot cheaper). If you have just started riding in the past 2 years or something you probably don't need disc. I rode for about 5 years with a non-disc bike, and did a little trial riding with non-disc breaks. Also to be 100% honest I do not see a huge difference between my hayes disc breaks on my P2 versus my non-discs on my rockhopper besides the discs are low maintance, and work better when wet. For me there wouldn't be a reason I would have gotten disc over good old pads especially for XC riding. There are many other things you could do with your money for your bike to make it better, and besides: how many instances do you wish you had more breaking power for XC riding? I had very little problems when I rode my rockhopper around. Only in very muddy wet weather, going down very steep hills did I ever wish for a disc break. I'd re-think your upgrade before laying that cash down.
Thanks nice post.
Ok I decided rather not to go for the disc brakes, but rather spend the money on something that I can carry over to a higher spec bike when this one is dead.
So I am thinking of going clipless.
 

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clippless rules if you are doing XC riding. you gain 30% hill climbing power when you first slap those puppies on, and you don't get as tired as quickley. However get use to them before you do anything crazy, because i've really worked over my knees on falls (they don't exactly pop out like ski bindings). Might i suggest the Egg Beaters by crank bros ... ebay 55 dollars (really like 110 or something). these things are so easy to use, only 13 parts so they are very simple, i've slammed mine on all sorts of things and they've held up, and mud won't slow them down. one draw back is no adjustablity but i never had a reason to adjust them. I think that investment is a much better one, you'll see a bigger difference in your riding ability.
 

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Sofa King We Todd Did
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dukeblaster said:
Might i suggest the Egg Beaters by crank bros ... ebay 55 dollars (really like 110 or something).
I'm new to the sport and I've had a pair of Eggbeaters for a couple of weeks now and can't imagine riding without them ever again. No need to spend $55 on used pedals from ebay, you can get a brand spanking new pair of entry-level Eggbeaters at Jenson for around $50, or at Nashbar for around $70 and those come with a pair of shoes, too!
 

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Very good decision.

phazer said:
Ok I decided rather not to go for the disc brakes, but rather spend the money on something that I can carry over to a higher spec bike when this one is dead.
So I am thinking of going clipless.
Make sure you get the shoes to go with them ;) And if you don't have them, some decent bike shorts are a good investment.

Also, lose the reflectors on the wheels. I can't tell from the picture which tyres you have, but this is often a good (cheap) upgrade. Wait until they currents ones wear out, though.
 
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