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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I was riding my Yukon the other day and noticed that I had to pull my brake levers almost to the grip to be able to stop. So I read up on how to fix them I tried turning the "barrel"? That didn't work so I went to the disc brake itself and held the wire while I pulled the movable part down until the braking power was correct.. Hopefully that makes sense. So what I'm asking is did I do that correctly?

Oh and the rear rotor was very hot after one hard brake, is that normal? I've never noticed it happen before I tightened the lever. Is it okay if they get the warm?

Sorry for such a noob question. P.S. I tried to the search but I couldn't find the right thread.

Thanks
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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Did you also your fleshlight?

What brake do you have? Different brands and models can have different adjustments.
 

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1. Never ever touch your rotor. It will be typically burning hot, but even cool your fingers could get oil onto the rotor.



2. It sounds like your brakes are out of adjustment. You should google how to adjust the BB5 brakes, but as a simple test before every ride, squeeze both levers.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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BB5s have three adjustments that you should need to use under normal circumstances. There's a barrel adjuster on the brake lever, a barrel adjuster on the caliper, and the inboard pad adjuster, which is the red wheel thing on the side closest to the wheel.

Avid suggests that you use the barrel adjuster on the caliper and the inboard pad adjuster to tune the brake if you're not actively riding, so that you can use the full adjustment range of the barrel adjuster on the lever during a ride. I don't think it matters which barrel adjuster you use - they both adjust the same thing. Both barrel adjusters increase tension on the cable, which moves the outside pad toward the rotor.

The inboard pad adjuster moves the inside pad toward the rotor. It's important to keep an eye on that too because if you wear the inside pad down to the level of the housing, the brakes stop working well. Total bummer - it can sneak up on you during a muddy ride, and then get you hurt.

You didn't damage the brakes or anything by adjusting the cable instead, but you may have to do it all over again when you replace your brake pads, since you may not be able to get the outboard piston to back out enough just by screwing the barrel adjusters back in. Or it could be fine. Don't worry about it until you install your next set of brake pads - just make sure the binder bolt is adequately torqued.

Are your brakes performing well? If so, you're all good. Brake rotors heat up because they're dissipating quite a lot of kinetic energy - you riding down a mountain - as heat.

In general, it's good to keep an eye on how the inboard pad is wearing. Hold a white piece of paper behind the caliper and give the wheel a spin. You want the inboard pad to be close to the rotor, but not dragging. It can be a little hard to see, but the paper helps. The outboard pad is a lot easier to adjust by feel. If your brake lever gets too close to the grip, it needs to be tightened.
 
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